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Thread: DFW Sports Superthread

  1. #51
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    One man's view of Plano

    Lancing Plano
    Dallas Observer, July 31, 2003, p. 17

    Five-time Tour de France champ Lance Armstrong has always been one of Full Frontal's fave athletes. He battled cancer, he has a schweet ride and he has the name of an action hero.
    After we read his autobiography--It's Not About the Bike: My Journey Back to Life (G.P. Putnam's Sons, $24.95), ghosted by Sally Jenkins--we were even more in awe of this cycling stud. Not just because of what he's overcome in his life, but because Armstrong hates Plano. He was born in Oak Cliff but grew up in that plastic Collin County town now fawned over by The Dallas Morning News. But don't take our word for it. Here are some choice excerpts from Armstrong's bio about his "hometown." Just remember them the next time you read that Armstrong is Plano's favorite son:

    "Plano had its effect on me, too. It was the quintessential American suburb, with strip malls, perfect grid streets, and faux-antebellum country clubs in between empty brown wasted fields. It was populated by guys in golf shirts and Sansabelt pants, and women in bright fake gold jewelry, and alienated teenagers. Nothing there was old, nothing real. To me there was something soul-deadened about the place."

    "In Plano, Texas, if you weren't a football player, you didn't exist, and if you weren't upper middle class, you might as well not exist either."

    "I felt shunned at times. I was the guy who did weird sports and who didn't wear the right labels...There was an unwritten dress code; the socially acceptable people all wore uniforms with Polo labels on them. They might not have known it, but that's what they were: uniforms. Same pants, same boots, same belts, same wallets, same caps. It was total conformity, and everything I was against."

    "Not even the teachers at school seemed to understand what I was after. During the second semester of my senior year [at Plano East High School], I was invited by the U.S. Cycling Federation to go to Colorado Springs to train with the junior U.S. national team, and to travel to Moscow for my first big international bike race, the 1990 Junior World Championships...But the administrators at Plano East objected...You'd think a trip to Moscow would be worth extra credits, and you'd think a school would be proud to have an Olympic prospect in its graduation rolls. But they didn't care."

    "A team of six administrators met with my mother and me and told us that unless I made up all of the work in every subject over just a few weeks, I wouldn't graduate with my class...'But there's no way I can do that,' I told them. The suits just looked at me. 'You're not a quitter, are you?' one of them said...By the end of the day, [my mother] had found a private academy, Bending Oaks, that was willing to accept me if I took a couple of make-up courses. We transferred all my credits from Plano East, and I got my degree on time."

    "Not long ago, Plano East held its 10th reunion. I wasn't invited."

  2. #52
    Sea™ CTroyMathis's Avatar
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    ^Good freakin' article.

    Here's one on some WPHL action...
    .................................................. .....................................

    Pucks & Profits
    The FW Brahmas hockey team may be minor league,but it has to be all-pro to find sponsors, stretch dollars

    BY BOB FRANCIS
    Fort Worth Business Press

    The Fort Worth Brahmas are hard at work though the season doesn't begin until Oct. 18, most players aren't signed and the weather is an ice-melting 100 degrees. The minor-league hockey team’s front office is busy trying to score sponsorships, cross checking other area teams for ticket sales and fighting for mind share among area sports fans.

    Minor-league hockey may be a business that involves freezing ice, bloody players, gimmicky promotions and rabid fans, but it is still just a business, said Mike Barack, general manager for the five-year-old Fort Worth hockey team.

    "We're just like any business; it just so happens that our business is hockey," said Barack, who has been general manager since 1998.

    Minor-league teams such as the Brahmas are an important part of a city's amenities, says Terry Clower, assistant director of the University of North Texas Center for Economic Development in Denton. "They add to the attractiveness of the area and make it easier to attract corporations and individuals," he said.

    The largest economic benefit may be more indirect than a major-league team. "They keep more money in a community that might otherwise be spent elsewhere. That's very important," Clower said.

    Fort Worth also is home to the revitalized Fort Worth Cats, a minor-league baseball team. The Cats are prospering, averaging around 3,600 attendees per home game. The privately-held Cats will not say if they are profitable yet or not, but the team's attendance makes them the star of the league, according to club officials. .

    Improvements to the stadium are planned for next year. The club says it may add a carousel and a picnic pavilion outside the stadium. Inside the stadium, the club plans to add permanent restrooms and a clubhouse for the players. "We want to make this a very positive experience every time someone comes to a game and that's one way we can do it," said Brant Ringler, director of sales and marketing for the Cats.

    The Brahmas, too, are surviving financially, particularly considering the team has not made the playoffs for two years, Barack said. The club has not been profitable since coming to Fort Worth, but it has come close, he said. "We're pretty close to breaking even and we have a very nice level of support in Fort Worth, both with the fans and with corporate sponsors," he said.

    Management has stuck with the franchise for several reasons, explained Barack. "While we haven't been profitable, our revenues are strong and they've increased every year, except for 2001, which was an anomaly for nearly everyone. Because we've trended upward every year, we've increased the value of the franchise. That's considered very important. Also, for the Central Hockey League, we're in a big market with a large, 11,000-seat facility. They see a lot of value in that as well."

    But the most basic reason management has stuck with the team may be the simplest, Barack said. "The ownership of the team loves hockey. They want it to succeed in Fort Worth."

    The Brahmas owners are Stuart Fraser, majority owner, and Andy Moog, minority owner. Moog is also an assistant coach for the Dallas Stars.

    "It gives us a lot of credibility that we have someone like Moog here. He knows hockey," Barack said. Fraser is a vice president at Cantor Fitzgerald, the firm that lost most of its employees in the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001. "We have extremely solid ownership and they've been very involved. But obviously, since 9/11, Fraser has spent a lot of time dealing with that," Barack said.

    The Brahmas are the latest incarnation of hockey in Fort Worth. The sport came here in the 1940s in the form of the Fort Worth Rangers. The most well-known teams were the Fort Worth Wings and the Fort Worth Texans in the 1970s and 1980s. "There was another club called the Fort Worth Brahmas prior to this, but they really had nothing to do with this organization other than the name," Barack said. That was back in 1997, when Fort Worth sported two minor-league hockey franchises, the Fort Worth Fire and the Brahmas. That lasted only one season and this franchise was born out of that icy tangled web.

    Barack was willing to break down his business for this story. Out of a $2-million budget, the Brahmas spend $204,000 on players salaries; insurance and other expenses bring that total to approximately $300,000.

    As a member of the Central Hockey League, the Brahmas are confined to spending limits of $8,500 per week for team salaries. That averages $500 per week per player on a 17-player rooster. The salary limitation has gone down the past few years, Barack said, which has saved the company some money. But, like any business, money saved in one area is lost in another; in this case, increases in insurance costs. "Those insurance increases have more than eaten up anything we've saved in the reduction in the salary cap," he said.

    Salaries are not necessarily equitable for the players. The Brahmas have signed a "star" or two, including left wing sensation Chad Wollard. "Usually in Double-A hockey, a team will have two or three players that they build the team around. That's the kind of player Wollard is," Barack said.

    There are also salaries for the coaches and, most years, a trainer. The Brahmas just signed their coach, Bill Inglis, and assistant coach, Craig Johnson, to contracts for next season. Inglis replaced Todd Lalonde as coach in mid-season after the Brahmas got off to a less-than-stunning start.

    Other expenses include anything related to hockey, such as equipment, a bus for the players and travel. The Brahmas also pay funds to the Fort Worth Convention Center and, until this year, to the Will Rogers Coliseum, for their games.

    "This will be the first year that we won't play any games at Will Rogers and we're a little bummed by that. A lot of fans really like the Will Rogers complex because it's smaller and there's a history there because that's where some of Fort Worth's first professional hockey was played," Barack said. Scheduling conflicts, such as the move of the Fort Worth Stock Show to later in January, prevented the Brahmas from making any Will Rogers stops this season, he said.

    The Brahmas are the major tenant of the Fort Worth Convention Center, paying $130,000 annually, which includes security and ushers. Many other minor-league hockey teams receive a percentage of the concession and parking from their venue, but that's not the case in Fort Worth.

    "We've tried to work something out with the city on that, but it hasn't worked out," Barack said. However, the Brahmas do receive space in the convention center that they can sell and can keep the revenue from those sales.

    Unlike major-league franchises that receive income from media broadcasts, the Brahmas pay for their TV and radio. Currently they broadcast on radio and some games are broadcast on television. "Fort Worth Community Cable just started doing some games live and K-STR and Channel 52 broadcast some games several years ago," Barack said.

    The team is in negotiation for next season's media lineup. "We basically look at the media outlets as a way to sell our sponsors another outlet for their products. If someone wants to advertise at a game, there will more than likely be a media component to that sell. A lot of our sponsors look at radio as a bonus to the signage at the convention center," he said.

    For income, the Brahmas rely primarily on ticket sales and sponsorships. Barack says the club is above the league average on sponsorships and below the league average on ticket sales. Average attendance at the Brahmas was around 4,000 last season, somewhat below the league average of 4,401. Barack chalks those lower-than-average attendance figures to the economy and a poor team showing the last couple of years.

    "Quite frankly, we simply didn't have very good records the past couple of seasons, so we didn't make the playoffs. That impacted ticket sales," he said. The Brahmas ended last season with a by-any-measure miserable 16-41 record.

    Other CHL cities with better average attendance include Oklahoma City and the new franchise in Laredo. "In the other cities where attendance is better, they don't have other major-league sports teams to contend with," Barack said. Laredo was a particular surprise for the Central Hockey League. "The fan response there was great. No one knew how it would go and it went very, very well," he said.

    Dallas and Fort Worth have become a mecca for pro and minor-league sports franchises, with top brand name contenders such as the Dallas Cowboys to struggling upstarts such as two women’s professional football teams and the United States Basketball League's Fort Worth-based Texas Rim Rockers.

    While the economic downturn has hampered some sports franchises across the country, the impact here has been minimal, said Dave Arnott, a professor of sports marketing at Dallas Baptist University. "This is really the first time minor-league teams have come into an area that already has major-league teams. So far, it has worked surprisingly well," he said.

    A new minor-league baseball team, the Frisco Roughriders, a Texas Rangers affiliate, is averaging about 9,000 per game. Closer to home, the Fort Worth Cats recently blazed a Central Baseball League record by drawing 9,216 fans to its July 4th game and show. Overall, the Cats lead the Central Baseball League with an average of 3,562 fans per game at LaGrave Field. Both baseball teams face a similar problem in reaching their potential audience while major-league teams gobble up most of the media bandwidth. "It's a struggle at times, particularly when you're trying to build your fan base," said Brant Ringler, vice president and director of sales and marketing with the Fort Worth Cats. You won’t get them to say it, but the Cats have been fortunate while the Texas Rangers have struggled on the field and in the stands the past three seasons.

    Brahmas ticket sales are a product of team performance, too, and scheduling. "If we have a lot of games on Friday during October and November, we're competing with high school football. If we have a lot of Sunday games, we are competing with church events or the Cowboys. Things like that have a great deal of impact on attendance," he said.

    Tickets are priced at around $400 for a season ticket or about $15 a game. That compares with a minimum $20 per ticket for a Dallas Stars game. Barack says season ticket sales have risen, but walkup sales have dropped. Most ticket sales are made through group sales, individual sales and voucher books sales, and through the team's corporate care program.

    "With the corporate care program, a company will buy a block of seats and the money goes to charity. It's a very popular program," he says. Barack says local companies such as XTO Energy, CapitalOne and Huguley Memorial Medical Center participated in the program last year.

    Sponsorship sales also contribute to the Brahmas’ bottom line. Sponsorships are basically hockey advertising, such as logos, banners, blimps, program advertising and media tie-ins. "Two years ago, we set a franchise record for sponsorships by selling $800,000. The last couple of years, we've been between $550,000 and $600,000 in sponsorships. That's about a $200,000 swing and most of that is due to the economy and some changes in our staff," Barack said. Among the long-time Brahmas sponsors are Coors, Coca-Cola, Washington Mutual, Radio Shack, Chandler Auto Parts and Albertson’s.

    Companies also can sponsor special nights, such as puck night and T-shirt night. For instance, next season, a bail bond company is sponsoring a promotion where a fan gets to sit in the penalty box with Brahmas players.

    To build up its name in the community, the Brahmas have several programs that bring the team in contact with potential fans. One of the most successful programs is the Blacktop Brahmas, inline hockey clinics taught by Brahmas players and coaches at area businesses and shopping centers. The clinics are free for children between the ages of six and 16 and teach basic hockey and skating skills. Last year the program attracted more than 1,500 participants at 32 clinics.

    Other programs include Grades for Blades, an incentive program that rewards academic achievement with game tickets, and Healthy Goals, a co-sponsorship with Harris Methodist Hospital that sends players into local schools and focuses on teaching the importance of being prepared to make good decisions.

    While some of that seems a little serious, there is plenty of fun to be had at a Brahmas game, Barack said. He lists the top three promotions of the team as the visit by the Stanley Cup during the 1999-2000 season, Jersey Night and the visit last season by the Dallas Cowboys cheerleaders. "Promotions are key, not just to us, but to any team," he said.

    The most controversial promotion was the since-canceled Bikini Night. "Those were the first couple of years I was here and it didn't really work because we're trying to be a family-oriented type entertainment. The Dallas Cowboys cheerleaders work much better for us," he said.

    Ringler says the Cats most popular promotion has been "You Might Be A Redneck" night. "This year, we gave fans a Whoopee cushion and that was very popular. We'll definitely do that again," he said.

    He, too, has seen promotions that didn't quite work. "Little Elvis (a miniature Elvis impersonator) didn't work that well for us, frankly. We may not do that again," he said.

    Barack remains optimistic about the future. The Brahmas have done well in Fort Worth and are surviving in a competitive field. Another team in the league -- the Austin Ice Bats -- recently sold for a reported $2.1 million, which shows that minor-league franchises continue to keep their value. The new owners are expected to build the Ice Bats a new facility in the next few years.

    That is something Barack would like to see happen, too. "I would support any facility that might be planned for the museum area or the north side that might accommodate the hockey team," he said.

    Barack says he would like the community to take a bit more notice of the Brahmas. "Our feeling is that we're a Fort Worth property and we're trying to keep sports in the city at an affordable family price and that we're a benefit to the city," he said.

    Dallas Baptist University's Arnott agrees. "Minor-league teams contribute much more than major-league teams in terms of community. We're lucky to have them," he said.

  3. #53
    Sea™ CTroyMathis's Avatar
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    Another off-season hockey note

    <smallfont>Dallas Stars Partner-Up With Steelheads

    WEST VALLEY CITY, UTAH – The Utah Grizzlies National Hockey League (NHL) affiliate, the Dallas Stars, announced that they have signed an affiliation agreement with the Idaho Steelheads of the ECHL for the 2003-04 season.



    “The Utah Grizzlies are very excited to be affiliated with the Idaho Steelheads,” said Grizzlies Director of Hockey Operations Brian Poile. “The overall quality of living and the facilities in Boise are among the finest in minor league hockey. We feel the amalgamation of the Steelhead’s rich hockey history, fan base, first-class coach (John Oliver), and management team, as well as the proximity to Salt Lake, there is no better place for our prospects to develop in the ECHL.”

    The agreement provides for Dallas to assign up to seven (7) contracted players to the Steelheads. Several of which will see or have already seen time with the Grizzlies. Last season, Lexington served as the Grizzlies ECHL affiliate sitting over 1650 miles away from Salt Lake City. The Steelheads provide a much better geographical fit for Utah with just 340 miles separating the two clubs.

    Idaho Head Coach John Oliver is impressed with the talent in the Stars system.

    “Dallas and Utah will supply us with young talent that have NHL potential. These players will be motivated and highly skilled, and will be striving to climb the hockey ladder; first to AAA Utah, and ultimately to NHL Dallas. This higher level of intensity on the ice will bring a lot of excitement to our fans and allow them to follow these players careers as they move up.”

    The Grizzlies open the regular season on Friday, October 10th at the ‘E’ Center against the San Antonio Rampage. Season ticket packages are on sale beginning as low as $280.00. Call (801) 988-8000 for more information.</smallfont>

  4. #54
    Sea™ CTroyMathis's Avatar
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    The Parcell Administration

    http://www.dfw.com/mld/dfw/sports/football/6662162.htm

    ^ Interesting way to discuss the new coach. Parcells is it?

  5. #55
    Sea™ CTroyMathis's Avatar
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    Yes, the Mavs win!

    In LA! I was 18 the last time they won there.

  6. #56
    Administrator gc's Avatar
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    yeah, isn't that sad? It is long overdue!
    “We shape our Cities, thereafter they shape us.”

  7. #57
    The Urban Pragmatist Mballar's Avatar
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    Mavs' Bradley to retire, source says
    02:15 AM CDT on Thursday, June 23, 2005
    By EDDIE SEFKO / The Dallas Morning News

    The Mavericks are working on a long-term buyout of center Shawn Bradley's contract that would facilitate the retirement of the 12-year veteran.

    A Mavericks source said Wednesday that the buyout would pay Bradley all of the money he is owed under terms of his contract, but would be spread out over numerous years. His deal calls for him to earn $14.5 million over the next three seasons, including $4.5 million in 2005-06.

    According to the source, the 7-6 Bradley has become frustrated with injuries, which included knee and hip problems the past season, and is eager to spend more time with his family, which includes a newborn, as well as five other children for him and wife Annette.

    Bradley had a love-hate relationship with coach Don Nelson for most of his eight-plus seasons with the Mavericks. When Avery Johnson took over as coach in March, Bradley clearly became the Mavericks' 12th man.

    With young centers Pavel Podkolzin and D.J. Mbenga on the roster, the 33-year-old Bradley was unlikely to get much playing time next season or beyond. Bradley was the No. 2 overall pick in the 1993 draft but never fulfilled expectations.

    He averaged 8.1 points and 6.3 rebounds for his career, but those numbers tailed off to just 2.7 points this season.

    E-mail esefko@dallasnews.com
    A wise man speaks because he has something to say; a fool because he has to say something. - Plato

  8. #58
    The Urban Pragmatist Mballar's Avatar
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    ^never fulfilled expectations, huh? That's an understatement. I'm glad this chapter in Mavs history is coming to an end!
    A wise man speaks because he has something to say; a fool because he has to say something. - Plato

  9. #59
    Smile... :) mikedsjr's Avatar
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    I realize sports fans don't care about the players themselves. They only care about one thing. Winning. I love Norm Hitzges because he will bring the human element into the picture many times.

    He describes Bradley as a wonderful human being, a wonderful father, and a very charitable kind of guy.

    Good Luck Bradley in all you do.
    Listen to the Dividing Line, Pirate Christian Radio, CARM, White Horse Inn and RTS University the most nowadays.....

  10. #60
    LH Copycat Columbus Civil's Avatar
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    Charitable is right. He got a ton of money for doing nothing. He wasn't the most talented player by any stretch, but he certainly neglected to use the skills he had.
    Dallas uber alles

  11. #61
    Administrator gc's Avatar
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    This may be the best news all day.
    “We shape our Cities, thereafter they shape us.”

  12. #62
    Mile-High Skyscraper Member rantanamo's Avatar
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    brings back memories of walking through his hood while taking pictures. This tall looking kid emerged from the back garage of this huge, huge house looking very disgruntled. A blonde lady emerged behind him with a hand on her hip as if to say, "That's right, you better push that dumpster". The lanky man grew taller and taller...................and taller and taller and taller as he pushed the dumpster towards the curb. "Daaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaayummmmmmmmmmmmmm, that a tall kid". He looked at me with a "whazzup" nod and scurried away. "Dayum that dude looked as tall as.......................Shawn Bradley". Congrats Mr. Bradley. Hope you enjoy your retirement and family, not to mention that huge mansion if you stay in Dallas.

  13. #63
    The Urban Pragmatist Mballar's Avatar
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    Cowboys' training camp is 7 days away. Hooray for football!
    A wise man speaks because he has something to say; a fool because he has to say something. - Plato

  14. #64
    Mile-High Skyscraper Member rantanamo's Avatar
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    ahh football. Love ya, hate ya. You bring me pain, you bring me joy. Why do I let that game control me?

  15. #65
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    Quote Originally Posted by rantanamo
    ahh football. Love ya, hate ya. You bring me pain, you bring me joy. Why do I let that game control me?
    Because it's your integration point?

  16. #66
    Mile-High Skyscraper Member rantanamo's Avatar
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    or it could be my segregation point. The diehards know all about that.

  17. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by CTroyMathis
    Let this be the official open-ended thread about local sports.

    CURRENT TEAMS:

    Dallas Magpies (US Australian Football League)
    The Magpies are an Australian Football team - which isn't Rugby!! In fact, Aussie Rules Fooy isn't anything like rugby...

    For more info: http://www.dallasfooty.com

    If people are interested, when the weather gets better in Feb/Mar 06, the club will be running a Touch Aussie Rules league for anyone and everyone that wants to learn the game. It will be underlights in Carrollton one or two nights per week.

  18. #68
    Administrator dfwcre8tive's Avatar
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    http://www.bizjournals.com/dallas/st...7/daily36.html

    Thursday, December 20, 2007 - 3:39 PM CST
    Minor-league basketball takes a shot at Dallas
    Dallas Business Journal - by Dave Moore Staff Writer

    Minor-league professional basketball is coming to Dallas.

    The team, the Dallas Defenders, will play its first home game on Jan. 20 against the Rockford Fury at the Dallas Independent School District's Loos Fieldhouse in Addison.

    The tip-off will signify the first time minor-league men's basketball has been played in Dallas.

    The team is owned by a group led by Erin Patton, who helped build Nike's Jordan brand and headed up the launch of NBA star Stephon Marbury's Starbury line of $14.98 basketball shoes.

    "The underlying philosophy to the league is making the game of professional basketball more affordable and accessible to fans and families, said Patton, an adjunct professor of sports business at the Southern Methodist University Cox School of Business.

    "A 6-year-old kid is going to look at the Dallas Defender player and in that kid's mind, he's going to connect with that person, and they'll take on a greater meaning to them," Patton said. "They'll become real heroes."

    Patton said a family of four could spend $100 for tickets, a jersey and food at a Defenders game, compared to nearly $1,000 at an NBA game.

    The first game for the Dallas Defenders is schedule for Jan. 4 in Moline, Ill., against the Quad Cities Riverhawks.

    Patton declined to say how much his group paid in franchise costs for the Dallas Defenders team from the Premier Basketball League (PBL), or how much it cost to lease the Loos Fieldhouse for its 10-game home schedule.

    The fieldhouse has a 7,600 seating capacity and general admission tickets will fetch $10 to $12, with courtside seats going for about $24, Patton said.

    Patton said the PBL serves as a feeder league to the NBA, as well as for European and Central American leagues.

    The last professional basketball team to play in Dallas besides the Dallas Mavericks was the American Basketball Association's Chaparrals, which left Dallas in the 1970s to become the San Antonio Spurs.

    dmoore@bizjournals.com | 214-706-7112

  19. #69
    Mid-Rise Member skys the limit's Avatar
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    .
    "Don't Mess with Dallas"


    With its Oct. 10, 2011 edition, Sporting News has put the
    Dallas area in the national spotlight with its cover honoring
    the Best Sports City.


    Dallas: If you play there, you better be prepared to win
    Bob Hille, Sporting News
    PUBLISHED Tuesday, Oct 4, 2011 at 1:54 pm EDT

    See that headline up there? The big one. The one that reads, in part, Dallas.

    Guaranteed it’s going to frost some pumpkins in Fort Worth.

    That’s the thing about Dallas-Fort Worth. It’s a rivalry wrapped in a mystery surrounded by a riddle: You’re driving south on I-35 from Oklahoma (maybe for Texas-OU football) and come to Sporting News’ 2011 Best Sports City. It’s a sports-mad place that has world champions and World Series participants, BCS bowl winners and if not the NFL’s most popular team, then certainly its grandest venue. Where are you?

    Not just Dallas, though that’s on I-35E and where the Mavericks’ NBA championship parade drew 200,000. Not just Fort Worth, though that’s on I-35W and where 13-0 TCU celebrated its pulsing Rose Bowl win over Wisconsin. (Right about now is when Arlington—Texas’ seventh-largest city—pipes in: Hold on, Hoss, we’re on I-30, and the AL champion Rangers and America’s Team Cowboys call us home.)

    You get the picture. The whole of the athletic area exceeds the sum of its sports parts, and in these parts it’s all about winning. The Cowboys’ collapse and Stars’ ownership struggles were merely the quarter-teaspoon of lemon that heightened the sweetness of championships won.

    Don’t sleep on MLS Cup runner-up FC Dallas and MVP David Ferreira, Texas Motor Speedway and postseason bowl games, high school football and palatial Cowboys Stadium, which has also played host to an NBA All-Star game. SMU football is back (legally) and though college hoops takes a back seat, you could fill out a dang good five with talent from the area. And did we mention Texas-OU football?

    There’s more, much more, but suffice it to say: While others name sports’ “most dominant” city for the first time (Boston? That’s soooo 2004), Sporting News, in choosing our Best Sports City for the 18th time, knows who brought the muscle.

    With that in mind, and for peacekeeping’s sake, then, let’s just call it the Metroflex.

    Article link: http://aol.sportingnews.com/sport/st...ks-tcu-cowboys

    -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


    Sporting News picks Dallas-Fort Worth area as 2011 best sports city
    SportsDayDFW.com
    Published: 05 October 2011 10:54 AM

    The Dallas-Fort Worth area, with the Mavericks winning the NBA title, Cowboys Stadium hosting the Super Bowl, TCU winning the Rose Bowl and the Rangers winning the American League pennant last season, has been named The Sporting News' Best Sports City for 2011, the first time the North Texas area has won the award.

    The area beat out Boston, which won the Stanley Cup in 2011 for the top spot. Philadelphia is third, Chicago is fourth and New York is fifth. Rounding out the top 10 is Pittsburgh (6), Atlanta (7), Los Angeles (8), Miami (9) and Tampa-St. Petersburg (10).

    "The whole of the athletic area exceeds the sum of its sports parts, and in these parts it’s all about winning," writes Bob Hille in his opening piece on the subject for the magazine. "The Cowboys’ collapse and Stars’ ownership struggles were merely the quarter-teaspoon of lemon that heightened the sweetness of championships won.

    "Don’t sleep on MLS Cup runner-up FC Dallas and MVP David Ferreira, Texas Motor Speedway and postseason bowl games, high school football and palatial Cowboys Stadium, which has also played host to an NBA All-Star game. SMU football is back (legally) and though college hoops takes a back seat, you could fill out a dang good five with talent from the area. And did we mention Texas-OU football?"

    The Sporting News explains that the list is based on the summer of 2010 to the summer of 2011 and ranks 271 cities and towns in the U.S. and Canada. Evaluations are based on a number of factors, including regular-season won-lost records of the area's various teams, postseason appearances, bowl and tournament appearances, championships, applicable power ratings, attendance, fan fervor and more.

    Past winners:

    2010—Chicago
    2009—Pittsburgh
    2008—Boston
    2007—Detroit
    2006—Chicago
    2005—Boston
    2004—Boston
    2003—Anaheim/Los Angeles
    2002—Boston
    2001—New York
    2000—St. Louis
    1999—New York
    1998—Detroit
    1997—Denver
    1995—Denver
    1994—Cleveland
    1993—Chicago

    Note: There was no Best Sports City in 1996 as the ratings were expanded and refined.

    Article link: http://www.dallasnews.com/sports/mor...?ssimg=337760#

  20. #70
    Skyscraper junkie gchrisbailey's Avatar
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    Started hearing talk on ESPN radio this morning regarding naming rights deals for both Cowboys Stadium and Rangers Ballpark...then I saw this article on NBCDFW...

    http://www.nbcdfw.com/blogs/blue-sta...133551258.html

    Maybe it's just Jerry using an example, but do you think there is anything to him mentioning "Pepsi"? Probably chasing nothing here...
    "...Give me your tired, your poor,
    Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free..."

  21. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by gchrisbailey View Post
    Maybe it's just Jerry using an example, but do you think there is anything to him mentioning "Pepsi"? Probably chasing nothing here...
    I've long thought--and still do--that he should name it the "Gene and Jerral W. Jones, Sr. Stadium." He's certainly done his share to contribute to the team's brand; fans will be able to rightly call it "JerryWorld;" and the retractable roof will allow his ego to continue to expand.

  22. #72
    Skyscraper junkie gchrisbailey's Avatar
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    ^It's already called the "DeathStar" as well...

    Why not get clever, contact George Lucas/Google/Motorola/Verizon etc. and have it be the "Verizon Deathstar"? Verizon HQ is in Irving, so it makes sense in DFW...
    "...Give me your tired, your poor,
    Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free..."

  23. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by gchrisbailey View Post
    ^It's already called the "DeathStar" as well...

    Why not get clever, contact George Lucas/Google/Motorola/Verizon etc. and have it be the "Verizon Deathstar"? Verizon HQ is in Irving, so it makes sense in DFW...
    Ha! That's great; I love it!

  24. #74
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    One argument Cuban can now make concerning a possible relocation of the Dodgers to Dallas is that since the Astros are switching from the National to the American League, moving the Dodgers to Dallas (and Texas) would keep a National League presence in the State that will now no longer be here after decades of having an NL team.
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Mark Cuban makes bid to buy Los Angeles Dodgers

    Dallas Business Journal by Lance Murray, Digital Content Producer
    Date: Tuesday, January 24, 2012, 1:30pm CST - Last Modified: Tuesday, January 24, 2012, 1:31pm CST


    Could Mark Cuban become the next owner of the Los Angeles Dodgers? It's possible.


    A bid by Dallas Mavericks owner Mark Cuban is among more than 10 opening bids for the Los Angeles Dodgers Major League Baseball team.

    The Los Angeles Times reported that Cuban submitted his bid by Monday's deadline to join East Coast hedge fund giant Steven Cohen and former Dodgers owner Peter O'Malley, among others.

    Some of the bids are among a group of partners, the paper reported.

    Bankers handling the sale of the team are evaluating the opening bids.

    This is not Cuban's first venture into trying to buy a baseball team. He teamed with Houston businessman Jim Crane in an unsuccessful bid against a group led by Nolan Ryan and Chuck Greenberg for the Texas Rangers in 2010.

    And, his name has come up several times as being interested in the Chicago Cubs.

    Article: http://www.bizjournals.com/dallas/ne...o-buy-los.html
    Last edited by Dallas Soars; 27 January 2012 at 08:51 PM.

  25. #75
    Administrator tamtagon's Avatar
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    As much as I hate the idea of the Dodgers moving out of LA (I think it has only slightly more chance of happening than the Cowboys moving out of North Texas), I would Love the Rangers to have a crosstown rival. I think Fort Worth should have a pro basketball team, too.

  26. #76
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    Not to be a wet blanket, but is there any indication at all that Cuban would want to move the Dodgers? Seems more than a little unlikely.

  27. #77
    Administrator tamtagon's Avatar
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    ^Cuban would probably find himself on top of several 'unofficial' Industry boycott lists if he moves the Dodgers, especially to Dallas!! haha.

  28. #78
    Skyscraper junkie gchrisbailey's Avatar
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    Although I like ring of the "Dallas Dodgers"
    "...Give me your tired, your poor,
    Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free..."

  29. #79
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    Quote Originally Posted by tamtagon View Post
    As much as I hate the idea of the Dodgers moving out of LA (I think it has only slightly more chance of happening than the Cowboys moving out of North Texas), I would Love the Rangers to have a crosstown rival. I think Fort Worth should have a pro basketball team, too.
    I'd love for DFW to be a two sport baseball town also, but it will never happen sadly, mainly due to the territorial rights that each team in professional baseball is granted. See the fight that Peter Angelos of the Orioles put up when MLB wanted to relocate the Expos to Washington DC and the current ongoing pissing match between the Giants and A's, with the latter trying to move to San Jose and the Giants vehemently opposed, as that is an area that is supposedly Giants specific for broadcast/marketing purposes.

  30. #80
    Incoherent Rambler grantboston's Avatar
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    Well, that didn't last long:

    Mark Cuban, Dennis Gilbert eliminated from Dodgers' bidding race


    The owner of the reigning NBA champions will not be the next owner of the Dodgers.

    Mark Cuban was eliminated from the Dodgers' ownership sweepstakes Friday, along with baseball executive and former agent Dennis Gilbert, according to two people familiar with the process but not authorized to discuss it.

    More here: http://www.latimes.com/sports/la-sp-...,1060031.story

  31. #81
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    Ownership of sports franchises is a club and they do not want Mr. Cuban in it. The baseball owners made that point very clear in the Cubs bidding and Rangers bidding. Given what they now know of him, I would wonder if the NBA owners would admit him if given a reset. Only purpose he serves is the Cary Grant role in North by Northwest, bidding at the auction to focus attention on himself.

  32. #82
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    Quote Originally Posted by mjblazin View Post
    Ownership of sports franchises is a club and they do not want Mr. Cuban in it. The baseball owners made that point very clear in the Cubs bidding and Rangers bidding. Given what they now know of him, I would wonder if the NBA owners would admit him if given a reset. Only purpose he serves is the Cary Grant role in North by Northwest, bidding at the auction to focus attention on himself.
    Yup.

  33. #83
    A Metroplexan Mr Carter's Avatar
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    The DFW area dominated Texas High School basketball for the 2011-12 season. Five State Champions!

    Boys:
    5A - Flower Mound Marcus (repeat champions from 2010-11)
    4A - Dallas Kimball (repeat from 2010-11)
    3A - Argyle

    Girls:
    5A - Duncanville
    4A - Mansfield Summit (beat another DFW area team, Rockwall, in the championship game)

    http://www.dallasnews.com/sports/hig...ate-titles.ece
    Last edited by Mr Carter; 14 March 2012 at 12:31 AM.

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