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Thread: High Tech Texas

  1. #1
    Super Moderator Tnekster's Avatar
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    High Tech Texas

    Texas ties with Massachusetts in "high-tech" ranking

    Texas is home to some of the top-performing technology companies in the United States, according to Deloitte & Touche USA LLP.

    Texas tied with Massachusetts for having the second-highest number of tech firms listed on Deloitte's Technology Fast 500, released Wednesday.

    Both Texas and Massachusetts have 41 high-tech firms on the Fast 500 list. California's Silicon Valley leads the nation with 54 high-growth companies.

    Of the 41 companies in Texas, 20 are in the Dallas-Fort Worth area, 10 are in Austin, seven in Houston, two are in San Antonio and one each are in San Angelo and San Marcos.

    Deloitte & Touche ranked 500 of the fastest-growing technology companies based on the percentage of revenue growth over the past five years. The number of Texas companies on the Technology Fast 500 has risen each year since 2002, while Silicon Valley has declined.

    "Texas is clearly coming into its own as a technology center," says Skip Moore, regional managing partner, Technology, Media & Telecommunications, Deloitte & Touche LLP. "I am encouraged not only by the number of companies and higher rankings as compared to previous years, but also by the variety of industry sectors and representation of companies across the state."

    Plano-based SyChip Inc., a semiconductor maker for wireless Internet appliances, ranked highest of the Dallas-Fort Worth companies at No. 10. NewMarket Technology Inc. (OTCBB: NMKT), a communications/networking company based in Dallas, came in at No. 13.

    The other Dallas-Fort Worth companies are: HRsmart, Richardson, at No. 54; Vertical Computer Systems Inc., Fort Worth, No. 56; Zix Corp. (Nasdaq: ZIXI), Dallas, 73; Citadel Security Software Inc. (Nasdaq: CDSS), Dallas, 172; GoodmanNetworks Inc., Farmers Branch, 235; Accuro Healthcare Solutions, Dallas, 236; Ramquest, Dallas, 242; Handango, Hurst, 254; Advanced Neuromodulation Systems Inc. (Nasdaq: ANSI), Plano, 327; TECSys development Inc., Plano, 376; Digital Generation Systems Inc., Irving, 393; Resulte Universal, Dallas, 394; GTESS, Richardson, 451; Plexon Inc., Dallas, 463; Efore Inc., Irving, 476; and Infovision Consultants Inc., Richardson, 477.

    Web site: www.deloitte.com



  2. #2
    Perpetual Amateur
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    This is great to read! Maybe the heyday of Richardson's tech corridor is far from over...

  3. #3
    Super Moderator Tnekster's Avatar
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    Would love to see Texas eclipse Californina. Now I think it could happen. Go Texas!!!!

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    Keep in mind that the comparison that is being made is the entire state of Texas (Dallas, FTW, Houston, Austin, etc) to (1) the Boston area and (2) the Silicon Valley. In Northern CA alone, you could add San Fran and Oakland to increase the CA number. Once you throw in LA, OC, San Diego, Sacramento, Santa Barbara, etc that number would be so far ahead of Texas as to make any comparison rediculous.

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    SoCal emigre infoscott's Avatar
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    That's why the mentions only include a fraction of the 500 on the Fast list. But the point of the article was to compare TX to MA, not CA to TX or CA to MA.

    My brother owns a company in southwest Missouri that is recruiting high tech workers to telecommute in. I'm trying to redirect his hiring efforts to Dallas candidates, especially now that it's clear there is a nifty pool. Kewl!

    Quote Originally Posted by bshiker
    Keep in mind that the comparison that is being made is the entire state of Texas (Dallas, FTW, Houston, Austin, etc) to (1) the Boston area and (2) the Silicon Valley. In Northern CA alone, you could add San Fran and Oakland to increase the CA number. Once you throw in LA, OC, San Diego, Sacramento, Santa Barbara, etc that number would be so far ahead of Texas as to make any comparison rediculous.

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    The comparison to MA is still not correct. There is only one main metro area (Boston) in MA. It is a good guess that almost all of the corps on the list in MA are in the Boston area. The fact that you can combine 4 major metros in TX and still not come out on top of MA means we are pretty far behind.

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    ^I think the point is that Texas is coming up in the ranks. The fact that we are at par with MA is an improvement and a signal that the state is trending up.

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    Administrator tamtagon's Avatar
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    Deloitte & Touche ranked 500 of the fastest-growing technology companies based on the percentage of revenue growth over the past five years.
    ...it's a list of the fastest growing tech companies. I would guess a list of the total number of tech companies would find the Texas total futher behind CA and MA. It's encouraging that the industry in Texas is keeping pace with the leaders; another guess - in the future, the industry will expand faster in TX than anywhere else, and that the Metroplex will lead the state. I'm predicting Houston will continue as the world's energy capital, but more and more, the Metroplex will become the most important business center and largest economy in the Southcentral US. Eventually, the Metroplex economy will be larger than Chicago-Milwaukee.

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    I think the point is that Texas is coming up in the ranks. The fact that we are at par with MA is an improvement and a signal that the state is trending up.
    A good point...it's all about progress

  10. #10
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    This is all good. As long as the entire state keeps progressing, all the metros will benefit. It will increase competition between our fair cities, which is essential and healthy for all involved. But we will continue to band together as a state when needed, to benefit "La familia" that we call Texas. I love it.

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