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Thread: Southwest & American Airlines

  1. #351
    Incoherent Rambler grantboston's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DallasNative
    It's been my experience, and I'd say shared by 90% of the traveling public, that you fly AA when there is no other nonstop alternative and you fly Southwest as your first nonstop preference.
    Most people pick their flights based on price, especially if they are footing the bill.

    Other than that, corporate contracts, schedule availability, frequent flyer perks tend to have quite a bit of sway. I don't think it's a realistic or fair comparison to assume that people pick from Southwest and AA as if none of those factors have any say in the equation. Especially for 90% of people.

  2. #352
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    I basically use the following thought process:

    1. Does Southwest fly non-stop there? (This isn't because I hate AA or anything. It more has to do with the price and convenience of Love Field.)
    2. If not, I go with AA due to frequent flyer miles. (Typically, the price between AA and others out of DFW are not too drastic but if they are then yes I would fly some other airline)

  3. #353
    Administrator dfwcre8tive's Avatar
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    Here's a funny photo from a recent trip from St Louis to Love Field on AA.

    Notice anything wrong with the destination sign?


  4. #354
    High-Rise Member TexasPlus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by njjeppson
    Here's a funny photo from a recent trip from St Louis to Love Field on AA.

    Notice anything wrong with the destination sign?

    Looks fine to me. ipe:
    "Liberalism: Moochers Electing Looters to Steal from Producers."

  5. #355
    Baron von Crunk urban_bearkat's Avatar
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    All I see is a nonstop flight from St. Louis to Southwest's ticker symbol.
    "Some people have a deep, abiding respect for the natural beauty that was once this country. And some people don't."

  6. #356
    Administrator dfwcre8tive's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by urban_bearkat
    All I see is a nonstop flight from St. Louis to Southwest's ticker symbol.
    You got it. On AA, ironically.

  7. #357
    Incoherent Rambler grantboston's Avatar
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    So now we just need to keep a lookout for a Southwest flight to Amarillo (AMA) misidentified as AMR, right?

  8. #358
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    ^No... that was an AMERICAN flight flying to Dallas (DAL) Love. I assume you know that LUV is the NYSE ticker for Southwest. That is what makes it ironic.

  9. #359
    Administrator tamtagon's Avatar
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    I wonder if someone in St Louis got in trouble for that "mistake." pretty funny

  10. #360
    High-Rise Member TexasPlus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tamtagon
    I wonder if someone in St Louis got in trouble for that "mistake." pretty funny
    There is so much open discontent from the rank and file toward management at AAmerican, that this likely was not a mistake.
    "Liberalism: Moochers Electing Looters to Steal from Producers."

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  12. #362
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    From the Bureau of Transportation Statistics

    July airline flights stuck for more than 3 hours before takeoff:

    American Airlines - 28
    American Eagle - 15
    Total AA - 43

    Total Southwest - 8

  13. #363
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    Quote Originally Posted by tamtagon
    I wonder if someone in St Louis got in trouble for that "mistake." pretty funny
    That is very funny. But if you also notice, its an American Connection flight. That means its Chautaqua or Trans States. So it was most likely one of their employees that did that. I bet it was some dumb*** that thought thats how it's spelled.

  14. #364
    Administrator dfwcre8tive's Avatar
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    American Airlines seat designer wants to give you space
    American's seat designer constantly figures how to make fliers comfy

    11:16 PM CDT on Monday, October 8, 2007
    By SUZANNE MARTA / The Dallas Morning News
    smarta@dallasnews.com
    http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcont...n.35ac443.html

    Next time you're squirming around in your seat on an American Airlines flight, don't blame Jim Hadden if you don't have enough legroom.

    Mr. Hadden, the head of American's cabin design, isn't in charge of how many seats are crammed onboard.

    He just has to figure out how to make them as comfortable as possible.

    And when it comes to the passenger in front of you tilting his seat back into your lunch – well, he's working on it.

    In his long career, Mr. Hadden, 64, has eked as much comfort as possible out of corporate jet cabins and passenger planes for Braniff International Airways, Continental Airlines Inc., Northwest Airlines Inc. and American.

    "My mission is to maximize living space," said Mr. Hadden, who rarely sits still even in his office.

    In the airplane business, creating more space for passengers means shaving as little as an eighth of an inch from an armrest or center aisle.

    "It's all about chasing inches," Mr. Hadden said. Finding an inch of space is "like finding a diamond."

    Over the years, Mr. Hadden has designed overhead bins, upholstery, armrests, expandable work trays, lie-flat seats and swivel seats.

    He even designed a sleek, curved stand-up bar for American's Tokyo-bound Boeing 747.

    "I had to go to a lot of bars to get that design right," Mr. Hadden joked.

    He and his five-person team have been busy lately.

    As American's balance sheet continues to strengthen after its flirtation with bankruptcy in 2003, attention has turned back to upgrading its seats, overhead bins and even the flight attendant carts.

    Last summer, American launched the Boeing 777 business-class seat, a revamped version of the one the carrier used on its 767-300 fleet. The upgraded seats, which fly on transcontinental and international routes, were an important investment for American, which had been criticized for offering inferior premium cabins compared with its international peers.

    Now the attention is turning to the coach cabin for American's fleet of 737s – whose seats haven't been updated since 1990 – and its 757s, which will debut new seats at the end of 2008.

    Mr. Hadden's job is not easy. After all, Americans have been getting larger, and it's not as if you can expand the fuselage.

    And these days, as the industry's paper-thin profit margins put more emphasis on filling planes and less on giving passengers more wiggle room, even Mr. Hadden admits he doesn't enjoy flying.

    Industry sage

    Aircraft design requires a flair for design as well as a solid grounding in engineering.

    "Jim is one of the great sages in the industry," said Klaus Brauer, director of passenger satisfaction and revenue for Boeing Commercial Airplanes.

    Unlike other engineering challenges, "comfort is something that isn't quantifiable," Mr. Brauer said. "You have to know what has been tried and what doesn't work from experience. That's where Jim and a few others in the industry are really tremendous assets."

    Mr. Hadden got his start in the aircraft interiors business in 1965 as a senior design draftsman for Braniff.

    During his time there, he worked with artist Alexander Calder on the airline's Bicentennial Airplane, a project that presented some unexpected challenges.

    Upon arriving at Mr. Calder's studio outside Paris, Mr. Hadden was presented with several scale models of the swirling, colorful design.

    "There weren't any drawings," he said.

    It was up to Mr. Hadden to find a way to transfer the trademark Calder design to the outside of a plane.

    "There were no straight lines," Mr. Hadden said, making the job exceptionally difficult.

    He ended up tracing the model on graph paper, blowing up the design to fit the plane, perforating the key lines and painting over the holes to create a guide.

    That kind of creative thinking, Mr. Hadden's peers in the industry say, is his hallmark.

    Boeing's Mr. Brauer, who has worked with Mr. Hadden for 15 years, said he regularly seeks out Mr. Hadden's feedback on projects.

    "Jim was one of the first people outside Boeing who got an initial look at the 787 architecture," Mr. Brauer said. "It was one of those meetings where I walked away reassured that we were on the right track."

    Stan Fisher, a marketing director for C&D Zodiac's retrofit business, said Mr. Hadden brings an unparalleled sophistication to his job.

    Exacting in detail

    Unlike other customers who send wish lists or design renderings, Mr. Hadden "will give you exact dimensions," Mr. Fisher said. "He knows what works and is very technical."

    Mr. Fisher said Mr. Hadden was one of the first to recognize that overhead bins needed to be larger as travelers started to carry more luggage onboard.

    "He's very intuitive about what passengers need," he said.

    Many of Mr. Hadden's innovations have set standards for the industry. An example is the Flagship Suites, which were installed into the first-class cabins of American's 777 fleet starting in 2000.

    The swiveling, lie-flat seating and workspace pods were American's answer to British Airways' luxe first-class seating. They took five years and $1 million in mock-up designs to develop.

    "One million dollars is a lot of money – but not if you make a big mistake," Mr. Hadden said.

    Mr. Brauer said designing a swiveling first-class seat is an example of Mr. Hadden's keen understanding of what passengers need during the flight.

    "That seat really stood out," he said.

    Not all of Mr. Hadden's ideas work, of course.

    Mr. Brauer recalls one idea his longtime friend had for staggering seats so passengers wouldn't feel so close to their neighbors. While it meant more room for the seats on the aisle and the window, "it ended up being worse for the person in the middle."

    Then there were the sheepskin seat covers in business class. Passengers loved them because they were comfortable and make the seat look wider. Unfortunately, they were too hard to clean and soon took on a matted look.

    Pivotal seat

    Mr. Hadden spends a lot of time in his personal shop, where he devotes energy to his first love, muscle cars.

    That's also where he worked on his greatest innovation – a patented airplane seat that didn't fly but influenced ones that followed.

    The 1989 coach seat featured an articulating chair that moved in its own space, rather than abruptly tilting back into the passenger one row back.

    "It was too expensive at the time," Mr. Hadden said. "The coach seat business is cutthroat. It's all about cheap because airfares are so low."

    Now, though, the concept of a seat moving in its own space is being used in premium cabins – most recently in the Boeing 777 business-class seat that American debuted last summer.

    It may soon make an appearance in the coach-class cabin, as American updates its Boeing interiors.

    It's one of many features Mr. Hadden and his team are trying to work into the plane's new seating.

    And the seat's armrests may be a tad narrower.

    "We're talking about one-eighth of an inch," Mr. Hadden said. "You can't be drastic about it, but we're trying to put the space where the customer wants it."

    He offered only one other hint about possible changes to the new 757 seat. The aircraft brochures and in-flight magazine will move to a new small pocket toward the top of the seat, leaving an empty pocket near the bottom for personal items.

    "That way, if you want to decrease your living space by stuffing the pocket, you're the one doing it, not me," he said.

    No rocking chair

    After 42 years in the industry, Mr. Hadden said he doesn't have any plans to slow down.

    Although American hasn't placed any orders for Boeing's 787 Dreamliner, he's given it a solid look-over.

    "I'm never out of work," he said. "Retirement is not in my plans."

  15. #365
    High-Rise Member TexasPlus's Avatar
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    Business as usual at AAmerican...

    Associated Press
    Pilots' Union Boss Blasts Airline CEO
    By DAVID KOENIG 10.10.07, 9:26 AM ET


    DALLAS -

    The president of the pilots' union at American Airlines ripped the company's chief executive in a letter that ended with a threat to "see you in court, in the newspapers, and on the picket line."

    More at:
    http://www.forbes.com/feeds/ap/2007/...partner=alerts
    "Liberalism: Moochers Electing Looters to Steal from Producers."

  16. #366
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    Quote Originally Posted by PuddinHead
    Wow what a chance Southwest is taking. Before it expected its customers to be able to identfy the first three letters in the alphabet and be smart enough to get in the correct line. Now they expect them to get in the correct line and be able to count too???

    :roflmao2:
    Counting comes easy to Southwest customers as they're used to counting all the money they save by not flying AA.

  17. #367
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    Quote Originally Posted by PuddinHead
    That is good since they will be spending the money they saved on fares to buy gas to get to those out of the way airports Southwest flies from. Before you say it......


    Dallas is the exception.
    Well, no one is forcing these folks to fly Southwest. Good thing they don't take AA's approach and try to lean on Congress to force passengers to fly from the airports they serve.

    Freedom of choice, a competitive marketplace... I know, that's crazy talk here in Dallas. Believe it or not, it actually works pretty well in the rest of the U.S. and most of the world.

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    Quote Originally Posted by PuddinHead
    That is good since they will be spending the money they saved on fares to buy gas to get to those out of the way airports Southwest flies from. Before you say it......


    Dallas is the exception.
    You don't know what you're talking about. How is Houston Hobby out of the way? Or other cities that only have one major airport?

  19. #369
    High-Rise Member TexasPlus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by UptownDallas
    Well, no one is forcing these folks to fly Southwest. Good thing they don't take AA's approach and try to lean on Congress to force passengers to fly from the airports they serve.

    Freedom of choice, a competitive marketplace... I know, that's crazy talk here in Dallas. Believe it or not, it actually works pretty well in the rest of the U.S. and most of the world.
    I have PH blocked, but your reply shows he has again taken a thread off topic.

    As this thread is about Southwest's new streamlined boarding process, I request the moderator move these off topic posts to a more suitable thread.
    Thanks
    "Liberalism: Moochers Electing Looters to Steal from Producers."

  20. #370
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    Quote Originally Posted by UrbanLandscape
    You don't know what you're talking about. How is Houston Hobby out of the way? Or other cities that only have one major airport?
    I think Puddin's talking about cities like Boston, New York, and Miami whose in-city airports aren't served by Southwest (albeit with some ATA codeshare exceptions).

    This week I'm flying to Washington DC (from Houston). I booked the ticket a month out, and my non-stop options were:

    A) Southwest to Dulles (22 miles from my in-city destination)
    B) Continental to National (4 miles from my in-city destination)

    I'm not really invested in Continental's frequent flyer program, and I fly Southwest much more, but when the fare of the discount carrier was over $150 higher and took me to a far less convenient (for my purposes, of course) 'suburb' airport, it was a no brainer.

    Plus I have the possibility of a first class upgrade on Continental.

    With that said, I'm looking forward to my first experience with Southwest's new boarding process next week. I'm sure it'll be great... no more camping out and I can cut my airport arrivals even closer.

  21. #371
    High-Rise Member TexasPlus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by interestedobserver
    With that said, I'm looking forward to my first experience with Southwest's new boarding process next week. I'm sure it'll be great... no more camping out and I can cut my airport arrivals even closer.
    Word of caution, SWA does not plan to have this new system in place system wide until Mid November. It is being phased in as the gates get updated, and the people at each station receive the training on the new process.

    As far as I know SAT is the only city fully operational with the new system at this time, along with some gates at DAL. It is a work in progress, I suggest you call and ask the status of your cites. If Reservations 1-800-435-9792 does not know, here are some more phone numbers.

    http://www.southwest.com/about_swa/phone_numbers.html
    "Liberalism: Moochers Electing Looters to Steal from Producers."

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    Quote Originally Posted by TexasPlus
    As far as I know SAT is the only city fully operational with the new system at this time, along with some gates at DAL. It is a work in progress, I suggest you call and ask the status of your cites. If Reservations 1-800-435-9792 does not know, here are some more phone numbers.
    How are they going to do it only at some gates, considering people check-in online up to 24 hours in advance with no gate assignment? Or will everyone out of DAL be given a letter + number, and only those flying from the ready gates actually make use of the number?

    Thanks for any clarification.

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    Quote Originally Posted by interestedobserver
    I think Puddin's talking about cities like Boston, New York, and Miami whose in-city airports aren't served by Southwest (albeit with some ATA codeshare exceptions).

    This week I'm flying to Washington DC (from Houston). I booked the ticket a month out, and my non-stop options were:

    A) Southwest to Dulles (22 miles from my in-city destination)
    B) Continental to National (4 miles from my in-city destination)

    I'm not really invested in Continental's frequent flyer program, and I fly Southwest much more, but when the fare of the discount carrier was over $150 higher and took me to a far less convenient (for my purposes, of course) 'suburb' airport, it was a no brainer.
    I'll give you that one. Truth be told, when I fly from Houston to Virginia to see my family, I go Continental from IAH to either Dulles or Reagan.

    Still, it doesn't change the fact that I fly Southwest when I can.

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    Quote Originally Posted by PuddinHead
    Get your facts straight. The Cities of Dallas and Ft Worth went to Congress for the Wright Amendment.
    Odd.... that guy testifying in front of the U.S. Senate looked much more like Gerard Arpey than either Mayor Miller or Moncrief.

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    Quote Originally Posted by PuddinHead
    Spin as much as you want to but remember the law was enacted by the request of the cities of Dallas and Ft Worth not American Airlines or any other airline.
    Actually, the original law was secretly initiated by Rep. Jim Wright, who slipped in an amendment to a voluminous Transportation appropriations bill at the request of the City of Ft. Worth and the DFW Airport Board. No one even knew it was in there for the first few days (this was back before computer-aided text searches, etc.).

    The new law was primarily backed by American Airlines, the City of Ft. Worth and the DFW Airport Board.

    Quote Originally Posted by PuddinHead
    By the way remember what Arpey said?


    http://commerce.senate.gov/pdf/arpey111005.pdf


    I want to make it very clear that despite our adversarial roles, I am a great admirer of Herb Kelleher and the entire Southwest team. But on this issue they are simply wrong. The fact is, Southwest has always had the opportunity to fly anywhere it wants, charge whatever it wants, and compete – along with everyone else – at DFW, a world class airport just 8 miles, as the crow flies, from its headquarters. That opportunity is still available to them. But rather than take advantage of this community’s enormous investment in DFW, they want to change the rules of the game, again, to their advantage.............................The only airline pushing for this change in law, Southwest, has consciously chosen operate at the constrained airport for 31 years in order to partake of its inherent advantages. Southwest could actually compete in any market from North Texas by simply choosing to fly out of DFW. Instead, it seeks an act of Congress to legislate a further advantage at Love Field, rather than compete head-to-head with 23 airlines at DFW.
    Wow... sorry, forgot what "Arpey said." Thanks, that makes everything so much more clear...
    Last edited by UptownDallas; 16 October 2007 at 10:58 AM.

  26. #376
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    If you dont mind, please move the Wright Amendment and Fallout broken record to the appropriate thread.

    Q. If a tree falls and there is no one around to hear it, does it make any sound?
    A. I dont know, but it's enough to get Puddinhead and UptownDallas bitching about the Wright Amendment.

  27. #377
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    DMN: Aviation consultant busts myths on airline strategies

    Michael Boyd says common wisdom on airlines is wrong

    11:27 PM CDT on Monday, October 15, 2007
    By TERRY MAXON / The Dallas Morning News
    tmaxon@dallasnews.com

    SARASOTA, Fla. – Aviation consultant Michael Boyd likes nothing better than to destroy myths about the airline industry, and the myths surrounding low-cost carriers and the old network carriers are among his favorite targets.

    In particular, Mr. Boyd takes aim at the common wisdom that low-cost carriers, or LCCs, will inevitably beat the traditional carriers in any market they choose to enter.

    The good low-cost carriers with good strategies will succeed, he suggested to attendees Monday at the Boyd Group's annual aviation forecast conference at a hotel here next to the Gulf of Mexico.

    "But the days of being able to toss a 737 out there and stimulate traffic just with fares, those things are over," Mr. Boyd said. "The LCC model is evolving."

    Among the low-cost carriers, Mr. Boyd said, he's most intrigued by what's going to happen at Frontier Airlines Inc. and Southwest Airlines Co. – Frontier, because it is moving upscale with nicer airplanes, and Southwest, because it's planning major changes in the way it operates.

    Southwest officials know "they have to morph and change things," Mr. Boyd said, "and when they do, they're going to be the nastiest competitor on this planet.

    "If you're American or any other carrier, watch out for Southwest. What you see today ain't, in our opinion, what you're going to see in three years. It's going to be a very tough competitor again."

    Among the things that the industry can expect to see, Mr. Boyd said:

    •Some low-cost airlines are diversifying their fleets, an idea that goes against Southwest's simple core concept of one airplane to serve all markets.

    For example, Frontier has introduced into smaller markets the Embraer 170, a 76-seat airplane with wider seats than jets from the Boeing 737 or Airbus 320 families.

    JetBlue Airways Corp. is flying the Embraer 190, a 100-seat jet that lets it enter markets that are too small for its core 156-seat Airbus 320s.

    Frontier president and chief executive Sean Menke said a lot of low-cost carriers were built on the Southwest model, with only one aircraft type.

    "Well, there's limited growth opportunity when you look at that," he said. "If you look where a lot of these airplanes can go, they're actually going to end up competing against each other."

    Marty St. George, JetBlue's vice president of marketing, said the Embraer 190 may be too small during peak winter periods in Florida. "But the other nine months of the year, it is a category killer."

    •The Southwest model of flying to secondary airports and secondary cities is changing as airlines find the best routes are taken. That means they'll go into markets they previously avoided.

    "They're running out of places to fly," Mr. Boyd said. "I don't mean that negatively." He said a Southwest executive swore four or five years ago that Southwest would never enter Denver. "They've got 40 flights a day there now," he said.

    "Markets like Philadelphia, markets like Washington, they've got to go to these markets now to get the revenues. It's a sound strategy."

    •The low-cost carriers will increasingly stay away from smaller markets as they chase the larger cities with the larger revenue pots.

    That means "no more Lubbocks, no more Jacksons. You might have small Albanys," Mr. Boyd said.

    "But unless you're a big city or you're a place that can collect a lot of people via a road system, you can just wipe them out," he said. "Don't even bother to call Southwest."

    So who will serve those little markets? Mr. Boyd said the conventional network carriers will because they have the hubs to collect traffic from the small cities and connect them profitably to other flights.

    That becomes important as the global economy touches more small cities and boosts the number of people who need to fly for business, he said.

    "Today, the traditional LCC model cannot handle where this growth is," Mr. Boyd said. "They cannot get into Shreveport. The Southwest fleet just doesn't make it. But can American Airlines? Yeah, with eight flights a day or whatever, and all of them full."

    That touches on another of Mr. Boyd's peeves, the notion that hub-and-spoke carriers will lose out to low-cost, point-to-point carriers because hubs are inefficient.

    Hubs allow airlines to collect much more revenue from flights because they can connect so many passengers from cities that otherwise wouldn't have airline service, he said.

    "You make money when you fly airplanes with people sitting in them. The hub-and-spoke system allows that to be done," he said. "Another myth is that the low-cost carriers are all point-to-point. AirTran Airways isn't. Frontier isn't. They run some point-to-point stuff. Even Southwest is 30 percent connecting [passengers], without which they'd be bust."

    Another myth is that network carriers are leaving routes when low-cost carriers enter them, Mr. Boyd said.

    "In fact, there's not one major route in the United States where a major carrier has pulled out because a low-cost carrier has forced them out. Moline-to-Cincinnati is not a major market," he said.

    "These comprehensive network carriers are not running from LCCs. They're very concerned about them, but they're not running."

    Although major U.S. network carriers are expanding their international routes, that doesn't mean they're abandoning their domestic routes, Mr. Boyd said.

    "Carriers like Delta and Continental are expanding international [routes] wildly, but it's to feed their domestic markets and make them stronger," he said.

    Noting Northwest Airlines Inc.'s Detroit hub, he added: "All those passengers going from China to Detroit, do you think they want to go to Detroit? They're going elsewhere."

    When it comes to ultra-small markets, Allegiant Air LLC is a contradiction. The Nevada-based carrier has found its niche flying from small cities such as Laredo, Texas, to leisure markets such as Las Vegas and Florida. Allegiant exclusively flies used McDonnell Douglas MD-80s on routes that no other carrier is serving.

    "To be blunt, we can't find a hole in that strategy," Mr. Boyd said.

    "I'd have to call it a bulletproof strategy."

    Citing Allegiant's success in flying to small markets, he added: "There isn't another carrier in the world that wants to fight for that traffic. So it's a home run."

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    American Airlines to start Chicago-Moscow flights in June
    02:29 PM CDT on Tuesday, October 16, 2007
    Bloomberg News
    http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcont...w.15ed00a.html

    Fort Worth-based AMR Corp.'s American Airlines plans to begin nonstop flights between Chicago and Moscow in June to take advantage of growing business-travel demand.

    The flights will be the airline's first nonstops between the two countries. American will be the second U.S.-based carrier to fly directly between the U.S. and Moscow, after Delta Air Lines Inc., which offers such service from New York and Atlanta.

    Russia, the world's biggest exporter of crude oil and natural gas, wants to double the size of its $1 trillion economy by 2020, in part by boosting manufacturing and high-tech industries.

    "The Russian economy is booming and many of our nation's top 100 corporations are doing business there, so the time is right to begin serving Moscow," David Cush, senior vice president of global sales, said in a statement Tuesday.

    The airline will offer the route six days a week, flying to Domodedovo International Airport, a privately owned and operated facility 14 miles from Moscow.

    Moscow is the fifth major international destination American has added from Chicago since beginning flights to Delhi, India, in 2005. The carrier added a daily nonstop flight to Shanghai in 2006 and in December will add nonstop service to Buenos Aires. It will begin flights between Chicago and Beijing in 2009.

  29. #379
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    Quote Originally Posted by njjeppson
    American Airlines to start Chicago-Moscow flights in June
    Cue complaints of AA neglecting DFW.

  30. #380
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    Quote Originally Posted by njjeppson
    American Airlines to start Chicago-Moscow flights in June
    02:29 PM CDT on Tuesday, October 16, 2007
    Bloomberg News
    http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcont...w.15ed00a.html

    Fort Worth-based AMR Corp.'s American Airlines plans to begin nonstop flights between Chicago and Moscow in June to take advantage of growing business-travel demand.
    This is fantastic news... between Moscow and the New Delhi route, it is now almost possible to fly entirely around the world on AA... seriously, this is a great addition to the route network.

    How did they manage to keep it under wraps for so long?

    Also, where are they going to get the 767-300 for this route?
    Last edited by UptownDallas; 16 October 2007 at 05:43 PM.

  31. #381
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    American, Gol Halt Bolivia Flights

    Associated Press
    American, Gol Halt Bolivia Flights
    Associated Press 10.18.07, 8:57 AM ET


    LA PAZ, Bolivia -

    American Airlines and Brazil's Gol Linhas Aereas Inteligentes SA temporarily suspended service to Bolivia on Wednesday because of an internal conflict among government aviation agencies, officials said.

    American said it will halt flights in the country until Friday, said Drago Komadina, a manager for American Airlines (nyse: AMR - news - people ) in Bolivia.

    Gol, meanwhile, planned to resume service Thursday, according to a customer service agent for the Brazilian airline at Viru Viru, Bolivia's main airport. She spoke on condition of anonymity because she is not an official spokesperson.

    Komadina told reporters American made the decision Tuesday after one of its planes bound for Miami was detained in the eastern city of Santa Cruz by the local aviation agency.

    Since Oct. 11, the agency has required airlines to pay in cash airport duties ranging from $1,000 to $2,000 at Viru Viru.

    Airlines have protested the new policy, and said officials are demanding payments be routed to private bank accounts instead of public fiscal accounts, as is customary.


    More @ http://www.forbes.com/feeds/ap/2007/...partner=alerts

    Given their expertize at paying off local people, I am surprised they have a problem with this.
    "Liberalism: Moochers Electing Looters to Steal from Producers."

  32. #382
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    The new southwest boarding system is stupid. They pretty much just cut a in half and b in half. They dont really care what your exact # is just which half you are. If your over 31 your on one side less on the other. The new seats suck, not back support and two seat share 2 plugs, so if you are charging your mobile and laptop, better hop the guy next to you does not need to charge anything.

  33. #383
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    Southwest Airlines Reports Third Quarter Earnings; 66th Consecutive Quarter of Profit

    DALLAS, Oct. 18 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Southwest Airlines (NYSE: LUV) today reported its third quarter 2007 results. Net income for third quarter 2007 was $162 million, or $.22 per diluted share, compared to $48 million, or $.06 per diluted share, for third quarter 2006. Economic net income for third quarter 2007 was $133 million, or $.18 per diluted share, compared to $154 million, or $.19 per diluted share, for third quarter 2006. (Refer to the reconciliation in the accompanying tables for further information regarding economic results.) The third quarter 2007 results include the following two charges, which were not reflected in First Call's mean estimate for economic net income of $.21 per diluted share:

    -- $25 million charge ($.02 per diluted share impact, net of
    profitsharing and income tax effects) related to the Company's recent
    voluntary early-out program
    -- $11 million income tax charge ($.01 per diluted share impact) related
    to a change in Illinois state income tax law


    Gary C. Kelly, CEO, stated: "Our fourth quarter 2007 revenue initiatives are well underway and on track with our planned implementation schedule. We began slowing our capacity growth rate this month and have trimmed our route system. We are very enthused by the response to our new Customer boarding method, which will be implemented system-wide on November 8, 2007. In connection with that, we have begun our "extreme gate makeover" to improve the Customer airport experience with an anticipated completion date of mid-year 2008. We will soon announce enhancements to our fare structure and Rapid Rewards frequent flyer program, supported by a new marketing and advertising campaign. We will also begin enhancing our revenue management structure, technology, techniques, and processes in fourth quarter 2007. We are continuing efforts to provide travel agent and professional travel manager partners with increased and cost effective access to our fares and inventory. We are particularly pleased with the recent expansion of our agreement with Travelport's Galileo to include Worldspan, another of Travelport's global distribution systems. We are very excited about these major revenue initiatives as well as our longer term ancillary and codeshare revenue opportunities, and are determined to overcome higher fuel costs and achieve our financial targets.

    "With respect to our third quarter 2007 revenue performance, we are pleased that operating unit revenue comparisons turned positive. While year-over-year comparisons were favorably impacted by the August 2006 terrorist threat and related carryon restrictions, third quarter 2007 operating revenues of $2.6 billion were a record. This performance was driven by a record third quarter 2007 load factor of 76.6 percent, which resulted from strong demand for low fares. Based on current revenue trends, bookings, and planned revenue initiatives, and barring a slowdown in the domestic economy, we expect fourth quarter 2007 operating unit revenues to exceed year ago levels.

    "Market crude oil prices hitting all-time high levels further accentuates our cost challenge. Despite favorable cash settlements from our fuel hedging program of $189 million for third quarter 2007, our economic fuel cost per gallon of $1.69 rose 7.6 percent from a year ago. We have derivative contracts in place for approximately 90 percent of our fourth quarter 2007 estimated fuel consumption, capped at an average crude-equivalent price of approximately $51 per barrel (compared to approximately 85 percent at approximately $43 per barrel for fourth quarter 2006). Based on this derivative position and present market prices, we are currently estimating our fourth quarter 2007 economic fuel costs per gallon to be in the $1.80 range.

    "We have derivative contracts for approximately 70 percent of our estimated 2008 fuel consumption at an average crude-equivalent price of approximately $51 per barrel; approximately 55 percent of our estimated 2009 fuel consumption at an average crude-equivalent price of approximately $51 per barrel; over 25 percent of our estimated 2010 fuel consumption at an average crude-equivalent price of approximately $63 per barrel; and over 15 percent of our estimated 2011 and 2012 fuel consumption at an average crude-equivalent price of approximately $64 and $63 per barrel, respectively.

    "Excluding fuel, third quarter 2007 economic unit costs increased 2.2 percent from a year ago, including the $25 million charge related to our recent voluntary early-out program. Based on current trends and various cost pressures, we presently expect our fourth quarter 2007 economic unit costs, excluding fuel, to exceed third quarter 2007's 6.52 cents.

    "As previously announced, we are pruning our flight schedule in fourth quarter 2007 and slowing our fourth quarter 2007 and full year 2008 available seat mile growth to the five to six percent range on a year-over-year basis. We have nine and 29 firm Boeing 737-700 aircraft deliveries in fourth quarter 2007 and full year 2008, respectively. We currently plan to reduce 2008 fleet growth by at least ten aircraft, bringing 2008 planned additions to no more than 19 net aircraft.

    "We are pleased with the Bay area's response to our renewed San Francisco International Airport service, which started in August. We are also pleased with the strong Customer demand for our new low fare service offered at Dallas Love Field as a result of the Wright Amendment Reform Act of 2006, which increased third quarter 2007 revenues by approximately $32 million.

    "As our Employees strive to counter higher fuel costs, they remain dedicated to upholding our superb Customer Satisfaction record, and they consistently receive high marks in Ontime Performance. Recent Southwest honors include being named the top airline brand for customer experience in the nationwide study performed by RTC Relationship Marketing. The study correlated brand performance, treatment of customers, and sense of community as the major drivers of overall brand experience. We also received the Frost & Sullivan 2007 CEO Choice Award for the Overall Best Airline in the United States. We are very proud that Southwest Cargo recently received its 13th consecutive Quest for Quality Award, placing first in Ontime Performance, Value and Customer Service."

    Southwest Airlines was also included in InformationWeek 500's annual listing honoring Southwest Airlines' extraordinary ability to deliver business value through technology innovation and execution and was included in Hispanic Business Magazine's Diversity Elite 60.

    Southwest will discuss its third quarter 2007 results on a conference call at 11:30 a.m. Eastern Time today. A live broadcast of the conference call will be available at http://southwest.com/?src=IR_101807.

    Operating Results

    Total operating revenues for third quarter 2007 increased 10.5 percent to $2.59 billion, compared to $2.34 billion for third quarter 2006. Total third quarter 2007 operating expenses were $2.34 billion, compared to $2.08 billion in third quarter 2006. Operating income for third quarter 2007 was $251 million compared to $261 million in third quarter 2006. Economic operating income was $252 million in third quarter 2007 compared to $260 million last year. Third quarter 2007 operating results include a $25 million charge ($.02 per diluted share impact, net of profitsharing and income tax effects) related to the Company's recent voluntary early-out program.

    "Other income" was $26 million for third quarter 2007, compared to "other expenses" of $183 million for third quarter 2006. The $209 million positive swing primarily resulted from unrealized "other (gains) losses" associated with Statement of Financial Accounting Standard (SFAS) 133, "Accounting for Derivative Instruments and Hedging Activities," as amended, slightly offset by a $9 million adverse swing in net interest expense. The cost of the hedging program (which includes the premium costs of derivative contracts) of $14 million in third quarter 2007 and $13 million in third quarter 2006 is also included in "other (gains) losses."

    The third quarter 2007 income tax rate of 41.5 percent was higher than last year's third quarter rate of 38.9 percent due to a change in the State of Illinois income tax law enacted in August 2007, resulting in an $11 million increase in the deferred tax liability.

    Net cash provided by operations for the nine months ended September 30, 2007 was $1.8 billion, which included a $600 million increase in fuel derivative collateral deposits related to future periods, and capital expenditures were $981 million. The Company repurchased 21 million shares of its common stock for $327 million during the third quarter, which completed the $500 million repurchase authorization in May by the Company's Board of Directors. This brings the total repurchases of common stock to $1.8 billion, or 116 million shares, since January 1, 2006.

    The Company ended third quarter 2007 with $1.6 billion in cash and short-term investments, which included $1.1 billion in fuel derivative collateral deposits. In addition, the Company had a fully available unsecured revolving credit line of $600 million. The Company repaid $100 million in notes during the third quarter. In October 2007, the Company issued $500 million in Pass Through Certificates, secured by 16 aircraft.

    Total operating revenues for the nine months ended September 30, 2007 increased 8.2 percent to $7.37 billion, while total operating expenses increased 10.8 percent to $6.71 billion, resulting in operating income of $664 million versus $760 million in 2006. Economic operating income was $651 million and $802 million, respectively, for the nine months ended September 30, 2007 and 2006. Net income for the nine months ended September 30, 2007 was $533 million, or $.69 per diluted share, compared to $442 million, or $.53 per diluted share, for the same period last year. Economic net income for the nine months ended September 30, 2007 was $362 million, or $.47 per diluted share, compared to $491 million, or $.59 per diluted share, for the same period last year.

    This news release contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, and the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Specific forward-looking statements include, without limitation, statements relating to (i) the Company's revenues initiatives and its related plans to enhance technology, techniques, and processes; (ii) the Company's expected results of operations for fourth quarter 2007 and full year 2008; and (iii) the Company's plans for fleet growth. These forward-looking statements are based on the Company's current intent, expectations, and projections and are not guarantees of future performance. These statements involve risks, uncertainties, assumptions, and other factors that are difficult to predict and that could cause actual results to vary materially from those expressed in or indicated by them. Factors include, among others, (i) the price and availability of aircraft fuel; (ii) the Company's ability to timely and effectively prioritize its revenues initiatives and its related ability to timely implement and maintain the necessary information technology systems and infrastructure, and other techniques and processes to support these initiatives; (iii) the extent and timing of the Company's investment of incremental operating expenses and capital expenditures to develop and implement its initiatives and its corresponding ability to effectively control its operating expenses; (iv) the Company's dependence on third party arrangements to assist with the implementation of certain of its initiatives; (v) competitor capacity and load factors; and (vi) other factors, as described in the Company's filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission, including the detailed factors discussed under the heading "Risk Factors" in the Company's Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2006, and subsequent filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission. The Company undertakes no obligation to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statements to reflect events or circumstances that may arise after the date of this news release.


    Full Release At:
    http://phx.corporate-ir.net/phoenix....454&highlight=
    "Liberalism: Moochers Electing Looters to Steal from Producers."

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    From DMN aviation blog, here is an AA platinum's letter regarding AA service.
    http://aviation.beloblog.com/archive...tr_1.html#more

    Airline service -- an unhappy traveler
    A while back, I wrote an article about Mark Mitchell, American Airlines' new managing director of customer experience. I also posted a long Q&A of Mr. Mitchell's comments on this blog about American's commitment to improve its admittedly lagging customer service.

    That prompted a number of responses, with skepticism as the main element.

    One letter was from Marti Doran, a Dallas businesswoman who lamented the state of service at American Airlines. It probably could have been written about most of the major U.S. carriers, but American was the airline she often flies.

    I initially didn't respond, because I didn't know what I could say. But she wrote again, and I finally got around to writing her back. With her permission, I'm reprinting her letter (and my response). I'd welcome any reaction.

    Dear Mr. Maxon:

    I wrote you earlier this summer regarding a lost piece of luggage with American Airlines. You were kind enough to give me some direction to assist with my problem. While I ended up locating the bag on my own, I truly appreciated your help.

    I read your article recently about American and improving its service which I have to laugh at. As a Platinum member, I have noticed over the years that their service is horrible from start to finish. Basically non existent.

    Since American has now outsourced their curb side personal you pay extra and in fact if you don't tip the handler they make a point of informing you that they do not receive anything from American. There is no cabin service to speak of, in fact after drinks are served, the flight attendant proceed to the back of the plane and sit in the last row reading books or papers. You pay for your snacks, you clean up their planes, and what is so irritating if you try to give the flight attendant your papers during the flight, they tell to you to hang on to the papers until the end of the flight, by this time my floor area is covered with papers and they want me to clean it up.

    I know it is discrimination and a company cannot tell an employee to lose, but if a person is too large how can they assist the passengers in an emergency? I have been hit in the arm so many times my flight attendant who could not walk down the aisle straight that I want to tell them to lose weight!

    If we ask for assistance in converting miles into a ticket the customer is charged $10.00 for an American employee assistance. Isn't this part of their job?

    You check in your own luggage at these self-serve kiosks, but have to wait in line for the baggage ticket. Again too cheap to provide service to your customers.

    Baggage restrictions rules are a joke. A piece of luggage by itself can weigh 10-15 pounds. Now you are charged $25.00 if luggage is over by 20 pounds. If you are permitted 70 pounds, why do they charge? Just more money in American's pocket. It used to be you could check two pieces of luggage and golf clubs with no charge. Now $90.00 why?

    Please do not say it is because of the fuel charge.

    American is overbooking every flight, filling planes to full capacities, charging for snacks, charging for water, charging for luggage, charging for tickets, so where is there any customer service?

    I truly hope once Southwest starts flying out of DFW that customers leave American.

    Does American realize how upset their customers are with their lack of any customer service?

    I'm sure I am not the only one who has expressed their disgust with American and would appreciate your thoughts.

    Best regards,
    Marti Doran


    Dear Marti:

    My apologies for not responding to your previous email. There's no real response possible other than, yep, that's true, and yep, that's true, and yep, that's true.

    I was flying AirTran Airways back from Sarasota, Fla., last week, and I was surprised to see the flight attendant walk down the aisle near the end of the Atlanta-DFW portion offering all passengers a cup of water. She had a stack of plastic cups in her apron, and a bottle of water in one hand. It didn't take her long to make the trip and not much effort -- but I was shocked, surprised and pleased to see an airline offering service beyond the bare minimum. When can you say that you received anything other than the minimum when you've flown a so-called full-service airline, if you fly back in coach like I do?

    We're in a weird period in the airline industry. The full-service carriers are offering the least service to the coach passengers, and some of the so-called low-cost carriers are offering such things as XM Radio, TV to every seat, free earphones and the like. The cheap airlines have the new airplanes, the higher-cost ones have older fleets.

    I'm interested to see whether a new customer-service tsar will be able to accomplish anything, at an airline that is saying that it won't provide anything that the customer isn't willing to pay for.

    American/AMR lost $8.123 billion between 2001 and 2005. Between Jan. 1, 2006, through Sept. 30, 2007, it has earned $804 million. It will take a long time to just earn back that $8 billion, much less get above water. And it must do it with employees, many of them long-time career employees, who are working harder for a lot less money and a lot fewer benefits than four years ago.

    From an outsider's viewpoint, all I can say is that's the state of the industry today and the state of American Airlines.

    Thanks for writing.

    Terry Maxon

  35. #385
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    When You Luv Yourself, it is OK to have Fun.

    Quote Originally Posted by DallasNative
    From DMN aviation blog, here is an AA platinum's letter regarding AA service.
    http://aviation.beloblog.com/archive...tr_1.html#more

    I'm interested to see whether a new customer-service tsar will be able to accomplish anything, at an airline that is saying that it won't provide anything that the customer isn't willing to pay for.

    American/AMR lost $8.123 billion between 2001 and 2005. Between Jan. 1, 2006, through Sept. 30, 2007, it has earned $804 million. It will take a long time to just earn back that $8 billion, much less get above water. And it must do it with employees, many of them long-time career employees, who are working harder for a lot less money and a lot fewer benefits than four years ago.

    From an outsider's viewpoint, all I can say is that's the state of the industry today and the state of American Airlines.

    Thanks for writing.

    Terry Maxon
    Colleen's Corner
    As seen in this month's edition of "Spirit Magazine" http://www.spiritmag.com/2007_10/col...rner/index.php

    Boo! Happy Halloween

    I absolutely LUV autumn with its crisp, cool days and falling leaves. To me, it is the perfect time of year, sandwiched between summer and the upcoming Holiday Season. High school, college, and professional football is fully underway, and everything just seems cleaner and fresher during this time of year. And of course, autumn means Halloween.

    As I have written on this page before, Southwest is trying to “own” all the major holidays, but in the case of Halloween, celebrating big is a longheld tradition for us. A Fun-LUVing Attitude is part of our corporate DNA, and Halloween is the perfect venue for that trait to shine. Around our system, our Reservations Centers and Stations hold a decorating contest, and our Flight Attendants spread the Halloween FUN on their flights (although security concerns no longer allow the wearing of full costumes). Our Headquarters campus becomes a “spooktacular” stage with many departments trying to outdo each other with their skits; others turn their areas into haunted houses. We are blessed to have Employees with the best corporate abilities in America, but I never cease to be amazed at our Employees’ creativity and talent in other areas, and Halloween is a showcase for them.

    Sometimes we have visitors from other companies as our Halloween guests, and I know they must be wondering why we devote a busy workday to such “frivolities.” It’s no secret that Southwest Employees play hard and work twice as hard, and Halloween offers us other intangibles besides just having FUN. The preparation, decorating, and performances are excellent Teambuilding exercises, and maybe even more importantly, they serve as confidence builders. I often see more introverted Employees (yes, we do hire a few introverts!) come out of their shells and blossom before an audience. In spite of that, we don’t need justification to celebrate Halloween because a little frivolous activity is well-deserved, and during Halloween, everyone gets into the mood.

    The past few Halloweens, I’ve “been” Della Street and Morticia Addams, and our CEO, Gary Kelly, has been Gene Simmons of KISS fame, Wild Bill Hickok, and Captain Jack Sparrow. On Halloween, Gary and I blend right in to the costumed crowd roaming Southwest Headquarters.

    It would be great if you all could attend, but don’t worry because if you’re traveling with us on Halloween, you may see witches, ghosts, showgirls, former Presidents, or any number of other characters walking the halls of our airports. Remember, this isn’t cause for alarm, it’s just Halloween—Southwest-style!

    Welcome Aboard!
    Colleen Barrett
    President, Southwest Airlines
    "Liberalism: Moochers Electing Looters to Steal from Producers."

  36. #386
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    Flew AA to SFO yesterday... left Dallas over a hour late due to "mechanical" issues... the plane was not stocked w/ food for purchase and had limited booze... landed in SF and had to wait 30 min for a gate agent to move the jetbridge.

    Everyone on the plane was saying "typcial American..."

    I want AA to do well.. hell, we need AA to do well for our local economy. But, good gawd, it is painful flying on 'em.

  37. #387
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    Thats every airline, a few weeks back flying to msy we waited over an hour for a flight to push back. I was flying south west we were the last flight of the night and there was a flight that was connecting with us that was running very late. So we sat there and waited for them. Great for the connecting passengers, bad for me who had a date that night. Though they did sell liquor to us as we waited.

    Monday flying to dallas with aa we were delayed about 15 min waiting for someone to sign off on something.

    Seems about half my flights recently have been delayed 15 to 30 min due to some delay

    Oh, quick question, I am flying out on southwest in a few hours, was thinking of taking pics of the new boarding areas or is that still illegal?

    Also why in msy does the aa terminal have free wifi but not the southwest?
    Last edited by downtownguy25; 25 October 2007 at 10:29 AM.

  38. #388
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    I fly Southwest every week...and, that has never happend to me other then weather. I'm not trying to turn this into AA vs Southwest... I'm just stating the facts.

  39. #389
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    Quote Originally Posted by St-T
    I fly Southwest every week...and, that has never happend to me other then weather. I'm not trying to turn this into AA vs Southwest... I'm just stating the facts.
    My experience on the two carriers is the same as yours. My friends and family members that use the two carriers also have the same experience. I don't think you can claim that delays and cacellations are equal at the two airlines. Just look where AA and Eagle fall on the DOT delay and cacellation rankings compared to Southwest.

  40. #390
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    Quote Originally Posted by downtownguy25
    Thats every airline, a few weeks back flying to msy we waited over an hour for a flight to push back. I was flying south west we were the last flight of the night and there was a flight that was connecting with us that was running very late. So we sat there and waited for them. Great for the connecting passengers, bad for me who had a date that night. Though they did sell liquor to us as we waited.
    I have stopped taking the last Love-Hobby shuttle of the night because of this practice.

    And I agree that what originally stimulated this discussion could describe any airline. Earlier this week on Continental we were delayed on arrival due to lack of ground crew and a faulty jet bridge, last month on Southwest we were delayed because of problems with a jet bridge (seems to be a growing problem, ha), and this past summer on AA we had a delayed arrival because of equipment blocking the gate.

    I do, however, think that Southwest's employees have better attitudes (that's a broad generalization, but, as a whole, I think it applies) and this leads to happier passengers. While their schtick is often not to my liking, I'd rather have that than a surly flight attendant.

    Last month on Southwest after the drink and 'snack box' service, a flight attendant came from behind me (I was in the aisle seat) to hand a glass of orange juice to the window passenger. I didn't realize this was happening until I felt/saw the OJ splatter on my portable video device which was sitting on my tray table. I looked up and the flight attendant said tersely "Sorry, shaky hands" and quickly placed the glass on my trey table and motioned for me to pass it to its intended recipient.

    Using the cocktail napkin provided I attempted to soak up as much liquid as possible from the screen before it did any damage. The flight attendant, however, disappeared with nary an apology or offer of assistance. I needed more napkins to remedy the situation (there was also juice on my clothes), so I went to the galley where the flight attendant stood with her back to me, either legitimately doing work and oblivious or perhaps too embarrassed to acknowledge me. Another attendant asked me what I needed and after receiving more napkins I left.

    I realize that this experience is not representative of the whole, but it just goes to show that delays, mechanicals issues, and even bad flight attendants can happen to any flight/airline.

  41. #391
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    Quote Originally Posted by St-T
    Everyone on the plane was saying "typcial American..."

    I want AA to do well.. hell, we need AA to do well for our local economy. But, good gawd, it is painful flying on 'em.
    I know what you mean, on several recent trips from DFW through SJU on AAmerican the "passenger acceptance factor" of poor service/attitude was the norm. The few folks that I overheard grumbling were answered by other passengers shoulder shrugs or "it's normal" comments. I will say that the service, and employee attitude on American Eagle in and out of SJU to several of the islands was far better than on domestic AAmerican. When we had a flight delay in ANU, we were kept up to date as to the problem and when we were actually going to board.
    "Liberalism: Moochers Electing Looters to Steal from Producers."

  42. #392
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    Quote Originally Posted by TexasPlus
    I know what you mean, on several recent trips from DFW through SJU on AAmerican the "passenger acceptance factor" of poor service/attitude was the norm. The few folks that I overheard grumbling were answered by other passengers shoulder shrugs or "it's normal" comments. I will say that the service, and employee attitude on American Eagle in and out of SJU to several of the islands was far better than on domestic AAmerican. When we had a flight delay in ANU, we were kept up to date as to the problem and when we were actually going to board.
    I positively love flying on Eagle. Maybe it's the smaller planes, or maybe it's the fact that American only serves Root Beer on Eagle, but they just have the best crew members on those flights. Even in Boston, I'll take Eagle over the much more established Delta/US Airways shuttles.

    Big brother AA could look down the hall at Eagle and learn something, if you ask me.

  43. #393
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    Flight with southwest a few hours ago was lacking. I had some chairs in a box and when checking was told, "sign this, we dont cover it if its damged so you better hope it gets lost." I was not too worried I had picked up the chairs from ikea because they were cheap and were going to be on my balcony. Boarded and fell right to sleep, flight attedent taps me to wake me up to ask what I want to drink, ordered a beer, was id. I have never been id on a plane before. Oddly enough same guy has served me the same drink every thursday for the past few month.

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    ^Well, we obvioulsy have very different experiences. Oh well.. to each is own. But, I would bet, 95% of the population of Dallas has the same expereince as me.

  45. #395
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    Southwest introduces business fares

    By Laura Mandaro, MarketWatch
    Last Update: 2:44 PM ET Nov 7, 2007

    SAN FRANCISCO (MarketWatch) -- Southwest Airlines Co. on Wednesday unveiled a new class of fares aimed at the business traveler who is willing to pay more for early boarding and a better choice of seat.
    The new fare category, announced alongside changes to its frequent flier program to award its most loyal customers, is likely to add at least $100 million to its annual revenue, said Southwest (LUV
    CEO Gary Kelly at a Dallas news conference, which was Web cast.

    Fares in Southwest's "business select" category would be priced about $10 to $30 higher than other fares and probably account for about 10% of the seats on a flight, said executives. For the extra money, Southwest will guarantee the passenger is among the first to board the plane by assigning him or her to the first portion of its "A" boarding group.
    Chart of LUV

    Business select travelers would also get a free cocktail on board and as many as double credits toward the carrier's Rapid Rewards frequent-flier program.
    "We're simply offering business travelers new reasons to choose Southwest Airlines," said Kelly.


    Full story at:
    http://www.marketwatch.com/News/Stor...&dist=printTop
    "Liberalism: Moochers Electing Looters to Steal from Producers."

  46. #396
    Incoherent Rambler grantboston's Avatar
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    I had my first Easyjet experience this past weekend. I was a bit surprised that Southwest hadn't already devised some scheme similar to Easyjet's "Speedy Boarding" that allows people (for a variable charge) to cut the boarding line and get on first. I suppose this new plan is a step in that direction.

  47. #397
    Administrator tamtagon's Avatar
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    I think within a few years, Southwest will take the failed-Legends Air approach, and offer first class only flights between certain airports.

  48. #398
    Super Moderator Tnekster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tamtagon
    I think within a few years, Southwest will take the failed-Legends Air approach, and offer first class only flights between certain airports.
    Now that's a thought. They could kick some AA a** doing that kind of thing. I can hear the pig squeel now.

  49. #399
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    Quote Originally Posted by tamtagon
    I think within a few years, Southwest will take the failed-Legends Air approach, and offer first class only flights between certain airports.
    According to sw all their seats are first class... :roflmao2:

  50. #400
    Supertall Skyscraper Member psukhu's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by St-T
    ^Well, we obvioulsy have very different experiences. Oh well.. to each is own. But, I would bet, 95% of the population of Dallas has the same expereince as me.

    I guess we all put up with AA since they are the best way to get back to Dallas when you're coming from the east or west coasts. I can't count the number of times I was in another city and I saw the Southwest ticket counter or gates and wished I could use them to get back to Dallas on a direct flight.

    It will be a whole new ballgame once long hauls are allowed from Love.

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