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Thread: DFW: International Terminal D

  1. #151
    Supertall Skyscraper Member texman's Avatar
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    After going through it on the Skylink also, its alot smaller than I imagned. But theres probably more than just the view from the skylink.
    "And we will probably be judged not by the monuments we build but by those we have destroyed."-"Farewell to Penn Station," New York Times Editorial, October 30, 1963

  2. #152
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    June 25, 2005
    12 p.m. - 8 p.m.


    Come enjoy family fun and sample our community’s international flair and Texas hospitality. International Terminal D is built to bring more global business and tourism to North Texas. It will create more than 77,000 new jobs and create $34B in economic activity over the next 15 years. From world-class facilities to world-class art, International Terminal D has it all. It’s your international terminal – enjoy it!

    Free admission and parking


    Walking tour of terminal


    Local artists in attendance whose works appear in the new terminal


    Community and travel organizations in attendance
    FOLLOW THE INSTRUCTIONS BELOW TO PRINT YOUR FREE TICKET

    To print your free ticket, please enter your e-mail address and click the "Submit" button below. Please note that you may download one ticket per e-mail address. E-mail addresses will not be used for marketing purposes; they will only be used to communicate event updates, if any. Once you enter your e-mail address, click on a time slot. Time slots are offered in 1-hour increments in order to assure smooth flow of visitors and traffic. Please visit the terminal during your designated time slot. This ticket is also your ticket for free parking for the event once you leave the Airport. This ticket is not valid for TollTag customers; if you normally use your TollTag to depart the Airport, you must go through regular toll lanes to present this ticket for complimentary parking.
    http://www.dfwairport.com/texasday/index.php


    To bad I'll be in Houston that weekend :-(

  3. #153
    High-Rise Member noelamador's Avatar
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    D/FW's Terminal D draws crowd
    http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcont....450cfbea.html
    Artistic fare meets international flair
    08:23 PM CDT on Saturday, June 25, 2005
    By SUZANNE MARTA / The Dallas Morning News

    Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport's new Terminal D came alive Saturday as area residents jammed the generous concourses of the massive building.

    Visitors watched an Aztec dancer perform Saturday on the concourse of the new Terminal D at D/FW Airport.

    They were admiring the towering atriums, touring the art installations and even picking up job applications.

    For people like Jane Schlansker, who worked with the airport when it was launching the project five years ago, Saturday's "Texas Day" meant finally seeing the airport expansion project come to life.

    "It's just fabulous," Ms. Schlansker said, and she congratulated D/FW chief executive Jeff Fegan.

    "We can see the light at the end of the tunnel," Mr. Fegan said, beaming as he pivoted from side to side to greet well-wishers. "This has turned out better than we even imagined."

    Frequent travelers, such as Ricardo Roberto of Grapevine, came to see how the new terminal might work into their itineraries. Mr. Roberto was marveling at the building's wide-open spaces and myriad restaurants and shops.

    "I have to spend two hours a week at the airport in Los Angeles, and there's nothing to do there," Mr. Roberto said. "I'd much rather have something like this."

    It was the stainless steel Crystal Mountain that caught the attention of his 6-year-old daughter, Mireya.

    "Is it real crystal?" she asked, before stepping through the sculpture's blue neon-lit walkway.

    D/FW officials estimated that 40,000 people visited Saturday, getting a sneak peek before the new $1.7 billion terminal opens next month.

    There was plenty for visitors to experience, between the live bands, dance performers, clowns and vendors.

    The terminal isn't quite finished, as evidenced by the partitions that blocked under-construction areas at its south end and near some of the shops and restaurants.

    Flat-screen monitors can be found throughout Terminal D, which will start handling flights as early as July 23.

    The airport is planning a phased opening, with the first flights using the terminal as early as July 23. All international flights from D/FW will eventually be shifted to Terminal D, which will also host some domestic flights.

    The terminal's onsite hotel, the 298-room Grand Hyatt, will open Friday.

    Terminal D's 27 art installations captured many visitors' attention as they wandered through the terminal.

    "I just can't get over it," said Dorothy Spears of Grand Prairie. "It touches my heart to look at all this art."

    Ms. Spears said the terminal's art collection could be what helps Dallas shed its J.R. Ewing image.

    "We have a lot of culture in Dallas, and you can really see that here," she said.

    Her daughter-in-law, Caron Spears, was surprised by the diversity of high-end shops and restaurants.

    "It's like a shopping mall in here," she said.

    The terminal's sleek architectural styling was the star for many visitors.

    Everett Lennon, a frequent traveler, said he was looking forward to coming back to Terminal D for a flight.

    This Skylink will move people from Terminal D to other terminals on an elevated track.

    "It's prettier than the Nasher and The Modern," Mr. Lennon said, snapping photos as he walked through the terminal.

    Mr. Lennon especially liked the light coming in from the 72-foot atrium.

    "An airport terminal can be a miserable place," he said. "It just feels alive in here."

    Euless resident Nancy Winsper was also impressed with the terminal's modern flair.

    "It's kind of like you're stepping into the future," she said. "Those plasma-screen TVs are fabulous."

    E-mail smarta@dallasnews.com

  4. #154
    High-Rise Member noelamador's Avatar
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    ^anyone here happen to go/ and or take pics?

  5. #155
    Supertall Skyscraper Member texman's Avatar
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    I went yesterday. Truly an amazing place, the ceiling heights, art work, gigantic windows, it was all pretty cool. The only thing that bothered me was AA's signage was EVERYWHERE. I swear, they've taken over like half of Terminal D. Really shows there grasp on the Airport. Also, all these people tried to get me to sign the 'keep DFW strong' petition.' I'll let the photos speak for themselves though. I got around 20+ pictures. Post them probably tommarow when I get them all uploaded.
    "And we will probably be judged not by the monuments we build but by those we have destroyed."-"Farewell to Penn Station," New York Times Editorial, October 30, 1963

  6. #156
    Supertall Skyscraper Member texman's Avatar
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    Terminal D - Grand Opening Photos

    Here are the photos:



    Here, you can see just small bit of American's takeover of the Terminal . They had a little less than half of the gates and occupied the whole northern side.

    Last edited by texman; 26 June 2005 at 03:03 PM.
    "And we will probably be judged not by the monuments we build but by those we have destroyed."-"Farewell to Penn Station," New York Times Editorial, October 30, 1963

  7. #157
    Member Dallascaper's Avatar
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    The DFW Terminal D music video

    Hello there,

    I had a chance to visit Terminal D yesterday, and I have to say it was very nice. In case you missed the big event, no problem. I made a music video dedicated to the building and the 'Texas Day' event. The video is not exactly a barn-burner, but it will help set the scene for DFW's big baby. This is my first music vid dedicated to something here in Texas - it was kind of fun - I might make more. Enjoy!


    The video is here

    P.S. The video is best for broadband; if it is too large let me know and I will post a smaller version.

  8. #158
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    Wish I'd made it.

  9. #159
    LH Copycat Columbus Civil's Avatar
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    I went yesterday, too, and enjoyed it.

    The sculpture with the Aggie rings was cool
    Dallas uber alles

  10. #160
    High-Rise Member noelamador's Avatar
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    nice pics Texman. thanks for resizing them!

  11. #161
    All Purpose Moderator warlock55's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Columbus Civil
    The sculpture with the Aggie rings was cool
    Texas needs more Aggie art.
    Consumers are not [the same as] citizens, and when a system pretends that they are, peculiar and even perverse things happen to decision making and democracy... - Benjamin Barber

  12. #162
    Administrator gc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by warlock55
    Texas needs more Aggie art.
    That is always true.
    “We shape our Cities, thereafter they shape us.”

  13. #163
    LH Copycat Columbus Civil's Avatar
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    Dallas uber alles

  14. #164
    Administrator tamtagon's Avatar
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    ^^"I've looked at clouds from both sides now, near and far, and still somehow, I really dont know clouds, at all."

  15. #165
    Supertall Skyscraper Member texman's Avatar
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    What the @(^%$!?!
    "And we will probably be judged not by the monuments we build but by those we have destroyed."-"Farewell to Penn Station," New York Times Editorial, October 30, 1963

  16. #166
    Mile-High Skyscraper Member rantanamo's Avatar
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    not gonna say a thang

  17. #167
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    Quote Originally Posted by texman
    What the @(^%$!?!
    It's an Aggie, get it?! I sure do.

  18. #168
    Administrator tamtagon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by UrbanLandscape
    It's an Aggie, get it?! I sure do.
    I figured you had been programmed such that you would not get it.

    Anyway, when is Air India expected to decide between flying through DFW or Houston? I wonder if Air India had they people checking out DFW during these grand opening functions. During the next couple years, I fully expect AA will initiate direct flights from DFW to many International destinations currently unserved through DFW, and the foreign based air carriers should follow close behind.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tamtagon
    I figured you had been programmed such that you would not get it.
    Like brainwashing? Oh no no, I don't go to A&M. I'm at Sam Houston.

  20. #170
    Supertall Skyscraper Member texman's Avatar
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    Well. I understood the picture, just not how it had relevance to anything.
    "And we will probably be judged not by the monuments we build but by those we have destroyed."-"Farewell to Penn Station," New York Times Editorial, October 30, 1963

  21. #171
    LH Copycat Columbus Civil's Avatar
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    warlock55 said we needed more Aggie art...and what's more Aggie than sheep-shearing?
    Dallas uber alles

  22. #172
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    Quote Originally Posted by Columbus Civil
    and what's more Aggie than sheep-shearing?
    Nothing!

  23. #173
    Supertall Skyscraper Member texman's Avatar
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    I don't know if you guys are serious, because seepshearing doesnt look like what hes doing to that poor molested sheep.
    "And we will probably be judged not by the monuments we build but by those we have destroyed."-"Farewell to Penn Station," New York Times Editorial, October 30, 1963

  24. #174
    High-Rise Member TexasPlus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by texman
    I don't know if you guys are serious, because seepshearing doesnt look like what hes doing to that poor molested sheep.
    "Molested sheep"?? I thought the fluffy one was the Aggie...

  25. #175
    In the O.R. Geaux Tigers's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TexasPlus
    "Molested sheep"?? I thought the fluffy one was the Aggie...
    Does the stick figure represent Bob Stoops?
    By the power of greyskull!

  26. #176
    Baron von Crunk urban_bearkat's Avatar
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    "College Station: Where the men are men and the sheep are scared."
    "Some people have a deep, abiding respect for the natural beauty that was once this country. And some people don't."

  27. #177
    Administrator gc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by urban_bearkat
    "College Station: Where the men are men and the sheep are scared."
    This is coming from someone in Huntsville....
    “We shape our Cities, thereafter they shape us.”

  28. #178
    In the O.R. Geaux Tigers's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gc
    This is coming from someone in Huntsville....
    You sure got a purdy mouth....
    By the power of greyskull!

  29. #179
    Baron von Crunk urban_bearkat's Avatar
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    I live in Huntsville. I am from Dallas. Fortunately, I am not incarcerated in Huntsville, although sometimes school feels as such.
    "Some people have a deep, abiding respect for the natural beauty that was once this country. And some people don't."

  30. #180
    Supertall Skyscraper Member texman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Geaux Tigers
    You sure got a purdy mouth....
    That sounds like a qoute from Deliverence.
    "And we will probably be judged not by the monuments we build but by those we have destroyed."-"Farewell to Penn Station," New York Times Editorial, October 30, 1963

  31. #181
    The Urban Pragmatist Mballar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Geaux Tigers
    You sure got a purdy mouth....
    Now, toss my salad Bi%*@!!
    A wise man speaks because he has something to say; a fool because he has to say something. - Plato

  32. #182
    Administrator tamtagon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by R. Mbala
    Quote Originally Posted by Geaux Tigers
    You sure got a purdy mouth....
    Now, toss my salad Bi%*@!!
    y'all all gross

    The DMN should post quarterly passenger numbers for Terminal D.

  33. #183
    Administrator tamtagon's Avatar
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    Celanese global HQ coming
    Chemicals company to move operation from Germany to Farmers Branch
    http://www.bizjournals.com/dallas/s.../04/story1.html
    Holli L. Estridge'Staff Writer

    Industrial chemicals company Celanese Corp. is relocating its global headquarters from Frankfurt, Germany, to its office in Farmers Branch.

    The company's Dallas headquarters will house corporate functions that oversee 29 production operations worldwide, with major operations in North America, Europe and Asia, Cullers said.

    "This will have a major impact in terms of the job numbers and the attractiveness of drawing similar companies to the region," said Linda Burns, the Dallas Chamber's director of economic development.
    Good news for Terminal D.

  34. #184
    In the O.R. Geaux Tigers's Avatar
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    ^Yeah, you gotta know that the expansion and opening of Terminal D has alot to do with multi-national corporations being based or relocating to the Dallas-Ft. Worth area.
    By the power of greyskull!

  35. #185
    Administrator tamtagon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Geaux Tigers
    ^Yeah, you gotta know that the expansion and opening of Terminal D has alot to do with multi-national corporations being based or relocating to the Dallas-Ft. Worth area.
    It's helped the economy in Atlanta.

    Is this door to door travel time scenerio true:

    DFW is only 90 flying minutes futher from Europe than O'Hare, Hartsfield-Jackson and the NYC airports; Ground commute time between DFW and Dallas area business districts is among the shortest in the country. DFW Terminal D processing time will be the quickest among US airports. Therefore, international business travelers will not bill additional travel hours flying to an office in the Dallas Area.

  36. #186
    Administrator dfwcre8tive's Avatar
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    Waiting to take off

    Waiting to take off
    Can emphasis on international flights keep D/FW's Terminal D busy?

    10:03 PM CDT on Saturday, July 16, 2005
    By SUZANNE MARTA / The Dallas Morning News

    With its towering atriums, modern sculptures and luxury shops, Terminal D marks a steep departure from an otherwise utilitarian Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport.

    Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport

    D/FW's Terminal D consolidates customs and immigration processing from three separate buildings to ease the way for international travelers. But D/FW officials are betting the new $1.7 billion international terminal will have a much bigger impact than that. Hoping to raise the airport's profile as an international gateway, they envision Terminal D as a launching pad for overseas growth for American Airlines Inc., by far D/FW's leading tenant. "With the completion of this beautiful new terminal, we are poised to play an even bigger role as a global connector and an economic catalyst in the years to come," said Gerard Arpey, American's chairman and chief executive.

    D/FW also expects the facility to help attract foreign-flag carriers that might seek to tap the vast domestic network of American, the world's largest airline. But the terminal's debut Saturday comes under a cloud of uncertainty. D/FW's expansion was developed during the late 1990s, when 2010 passenger levels were expected to reach 100 million. But when travel plummeted after the September 2001 terrorist attacks, construction was too far along to shelve the project. Traffic at D/FW is expected to climb to 59 million passengers this year, still short of the 60 million who passed through the airport's terminals five years ago.

    The terminal adds capacity at a time when D/FW least seems to need it. Longtime D/FW hub operator Delta Air Lines Inc. dismantled most of its North Texas operations in January, idling 24 gates in Terminal E. And renewed efforts to lift the federal law that restricts long-distance flights from Dallas Love Field have thrown more complications into the mix. If the Wright amendment is repealed, American has vowed to shift flights to Love Field from D/FW, now its largest hub. Other carriers have put North Texas expansion plans on hold until the issue is resolved.

    Streamlined process

    Terminal D caps a five-year expansion effort aimed at preparing the airport for the demands of airlines and travelers for the next two decades. With 2 million square feet of space, Terminal D is intended to streamline international operations at D/FW, consolidating immigration and customs processing that had been handled in three buildings. Instead of filing into the airport's cramped customs areas, international travelers will now walk through an elevated corridor with a view of the airport terminals.

    A massive passport control hall is outfitted with 60 checkpoints and illuminated by sweeping windows. "It's not a dark, dingy place where people are sweating," said Joe Lopano, D/FW's executive vice president for marketing and terminal management. "It's a clean, modern facility."

    Connections between the international terminal and all the other gates at D/FW will also be easier, thanks to the Skylink airport train, which opened in May. Previously, connections could prove difficult for foreign-flag carriers. Korean Air, for example, arrived at Terminal B. But its U.S. alliance partner, Delta, was a bus ride away in Terminal E.

    Unlike D/FW's original buildings, completed in 1974 before airline deregulation, Terminal D was built for travelers who are more likely to connect flights. The narrow, curved corridors of the original airport terminals were eschewed for wide, straightened walkways with moving sidewalks to speed the trip. Directional signs include international pictograms, easing navigation for non-English speakers. Additional kiosks include information in several languages.

    High-end stores and restaurants create clustered retail villages aimed at well-heeled travelers who, in the post-Sept. 11 era, arrive at the airport earlier and experience longer waits between connections. The new terminal also offers travelers a sense of Texas, with sweeping views of the big sky and a taste of its culture through more than 30 artworks.

    Although its focus is international service, Terminal D will also host some domestic flights. Gates can adjust for different size aircraft, accommodating even the hulking Airbus A380, should carriers ever decide to bring one to North Texas.

    D/FW's new terminal comes online at a time when international traffic is booming. Faced with intensified domestic competition from low-cost carriers, traditional airlines such as American are diverting planes to international routes as a strategy to shore up their finances. Fort Worth-based American has expanded its international service, which now accounts for 34 percent of its schedule, up 6 percentage points since 2002. Overall, global air traffic is expected to grow 4.8 percent annually during the next 20 years, compared with increases of 3.5 percent domestically, according to forecasts by Boeing Co.'s commercial aircraft division.

    Key markets

    Key global markets are growing more quickly. Traffic between North America and Latin America – where American dominates – is expected to grow 5.1 percent annually during the next 20 years.Traffic between D/FW and South America has jumped recently, thanks to American's new direct service to Buenos Aires, Argentina.
    Meanwhile, travel between North America and Asia – one of American's key targets for expansion – is slated to grow 6 percent a year.

    D/FW doesn't have direct service to China or India, but the airport tracks passenger bookings to both Asian economic powerhouses, and they're growing, too. By 2010, D/FW could be the No. 2 gateway to China, behind Detroit, said Mike Boyd, an aviation consultant in Evergreen, Colo. Although Asia and Latin America both offer major opportunities, flights connecting the two continents could be even more important. "D/FW finds itself between two very quickly growing marketplaces," said Randy Tinseth, director of product marketing at the Boeing unit.

    Commercial aircraft require a refueling point between the two continents, and D/FW, Mr. Lopano points out, happens to be right on the natural flight path. "They wouldn't even have to go out of their way," he said.

    Beyond the coasts

    The largest international gateways in the U.S. were planned on the coasts, in part because many aircraft weren't able to fly nonstop across an ocean and then into the nation's interior. "There's plenty of demand to other cities," said Alan Sbarra of Roach & Sbarra Consulting in San Francisco. "As aircraft can fly longer, they'll start moving to interior airports."

    Although international traffic is growing, it won't consume all the new terminal's capacity for some time to come. Terminal D was designed to accommodate the stunning growth in international traffic that preceded the 9-11 attacks, with increases of 14 percent in 1999 and 18 percent in 2000. After a steep decline, international traffic is growing again. By 2015, Mr. Lopano forecasts, international passengers will reach 10.4 million.

    Even with the rosy growth trends, D/FW faces challenges. Launching international service is expensive, requiring carriers to invest at least $400 million just to supply two aircraft to make the trip. And D/FW is competing with airports around the world as airlines calculate where the best opportunities lie.

    Visibility is another challenge. Although the Texas economy dwarfs that of nearly all other states, many foreign carriers don't know much about it. Mr. Lopano recalls his first meeting with executives at China Eastern Airlines, who "thought we were in Colorado." The carrier eventually agreed to launch cargo service three times weekly between D/FW and Shanghai using an MD-11, but "it took three years," Mr. Lopano said.

    New security procedures could also make international service a tougher sell. "If it's easier to connect through Canada because you don't need a visa, I'm looking at an uphill battle," Mr. Lopano said.

    E-mail smarta@dallasnews.com

  37. #187
    In the O.R. Geaux Tigers's Avatar
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    <TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%" border=0><TBODY><TR><TD>Posted on Sun, Jul. 17, 2005</TD><TD width=15 rowSpan=7></TD></TR><TR><TD colSpan=2></TD></TR><TR><TD colSpan=2>

    A new connection from D/FW to the world

    First international flights into Terminal D scheduled for Saturday


    By Bryon Okada, Tim Bedison and W. Matt Pinkney
    Star-Telegram

    <!-- begin body-content -->For all the grand talk about Terminal D:

    It's big as Texas.

    It's a gateway to the world.

    It globalizes the image of the Metroplex.

    Its designers say their goal never wavered: It has to be easy to use.

    Embedded in its 12,500 tons of steel and 1.84 billion pounds of concrete is the basic idea of combining the customer-friendly configuration of the existing D/FW terminals with international trends toward open spaces, high ceilings, natural lighting and extra amenities.

    "Early on, we described 'transport city,' a self-sufficient city in itself," says Wesley Wong, vice president of aviation with architects HKS. "It had food and drink. You need a hotel where you could sleep. It had conference facilities to meet in. When you flew in, you never had to leave."

    Theoretically, a passenger can live, work and play within this one area.

    New design, consolidated international processing

    Terminal D differs from D/FW Airport's customary C-shaped terminal to improve line of sight and add open space. Customs processing in Terminals A, B and E have been consolidated in Terminal D's centralized international level. The Customs hall can process up to 2,800 passengers per hour. The terminal gates can be configured to hold up to 40 gates using gate extensions, or "stingers," away from the main terminal gatehouses.

    Introducing Terminal D

    A straight shot

    From the parking garage, the path of the customer is a straight line through ticketing, security (in the center of the ticketing hall), through concessions and on to the gates. North and south areas of the terminal are mirror images, with very similar services. Exterior and interior walls are glass where possible, making the Skylink people mover and international in-transit lounge visible from ticketing halls.

    Concessions Village

    Diverse shops are consolidated at two strategic terminal locations. Stand-alone concessions are offered where gates are more than 300 feet from a village. Shops feature a mix of international and Texas themes. Seventy-seven percent of vendors are locally owned.

    Note: Terminal D will open with 28 gates, but numbering reflects the terminal's future 40-gate capacity.

    Center cross section

    Terminal D has five levels: Skylink, Customs, Concourse, Baggage and Service. The service areas are segregated from passenger areas to minimize traffic. Areas for processing international passengers are on a separate level from the domestic Concourse level. The 298-room Grand Hyatt DFW is the world's first Grand Hyatt at an airport. Its restaurant, lounge and other amenities are outside security and open to non-ticketed persons.

    Airlines and gates

    American Gates D18-D40

    American Eagle Gates D6-D20

    Grupo Taca Gates D38, D40

    Lufthansa Gate D17

    British Airways Gate D16

    Korean Air Gate D11

    Aeromexico Gates D6-D17

    Mexicana Gates D6-D17

    Air Canada Jazz Gates D6-D17

    Using the Concourse level

    Domestic flights are an integral part of Terminal D operations. Departing and arriving domestic passengers remain on the Concourse level. This level is "in the U.S."

    1. Ticket Hall: Departing passengers enter here. This area is "landside" and open to non-ticketed persons.

    2. Security: All ticketed passengers are screened at federal checkpoints.

    3. Concessions Villages: Retail and food services.

    4. Gatehouses, Level 1: Access to and from planes. Departing domestic passengers exit to Concessions Villages. Departing international passengers go upstairs to Customs processing.

    5. Exit to domestic baggage claim.

    Using the Customs level

    All international travel requiring processing is now in Terminal D. International passengers are segregated from domestic passengers during processing. Passengers in the Customs Corridor are considered "on international soil."

    1. Gatehouses, Level 2: Arriving international passengers will immediately go upstairs.

    2. Customs Corridor: All gatehouses feed into the corridor, which overlooks the Concourse level.

    3. Customs Hall: Processing of international passengers takes place here.

    4. In-Transit Lounge: A waiting area for connecting international passengers.

    5. Escalator to International Baggage Claim, down two levels.

    SOURCE: D/FW Airport

    By the numbers

    WORK HOURS SPENT ON CONSTRUCTION 10,900,000

    TONS OF CONCRETE POURED 920,000

    NUMBER OF TEXAS STADIUMS THAT FIT INSIDE TERMINAL D 3

    NUMBER OF CONSTRUCTION-RELATED FATALITIES 0

    <!-- end body-content --></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
    By the power of greyskull!

  38. #188
    Supertall Skyscraper Member texman's Avatar
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    Dear God, AMR has 36 gates. And why is American Eagle flying out of the INTERNATIONAL Terminal?
    "And we will probably be judged not by the monuments we build but by those we have destroyed."-"Farewell to Penn Station," New York Times Editorial, October 30, 1963

  39. #189
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    Hartsfiled-Jackson's new runway and International terminal will be operational in 12-16 months. So much for any facility advantage at DFW.

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    ^Hartsfield-Jackson ATLANTA International Airport

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    Airports gamble on fancy — and costly — terminals

    By Dan Reed, USA TODAY
    GRAPEVINE, Texas — When it opens Saturday, Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport's massive new international Terminal D will be one of the grandest airport terminals anywhere.
    <TABLE class=sidebar cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 border=0><TBODY><TR><TD colSpan=4></TD></TR><TR><TD rowSpan=2></TD><TD rowSpan=2></TD><TD class=sidebar vAlign=top>A mosaic by Fort Worth artist Jane Helsander is one of 12 20-foot medallions of art (eight mosaic and four stone) installed at gate areas inside the new terminal. </TD><TD rowSpan=2></TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=bottom align=left>Ian McVea, Fort Worth Star-Telegram</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>

    Built for $1.4 billion, the 28-gate terminal includes a high-end hotel and an array of features designed to move passengers with comfortable efficiency.

    But for all of its glitz and amenities, long-term success is by no means assured. The facility is just the latest in a series of big, flashy terminals opening at major airports across the USA. The airports that have been building them stand to gain from an explosion in the number of air travelers projected during the next 25 years.

    <TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 align=left><TBODY><TR><TD><TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 border=0><TBODY><TR><TD class=notch_header rowSpan=3></TD><TD class=notch_header> Plans to expand</TD><TD class=notch_header rowSpan=3></TD><TD rowSpan=3></TD></TR><TR><TD><TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=2 border=0><TBODY><TR class=sidebar><TD vAlign=top></TD></TR><TR><TD vAlign=top><TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=2 border=0><TBODY><TR><TD class=sidebar vAlign=top>Some key terminal projects:

    Miami. A small portion of a new $1.7 billion, 2.4-million-square-foot terminal is open. The project is supposed to be completed in late 2008.
    New York. A new $1.1 billion, 36-gate American terminal at John F. Kennedy airport is due for completion next year. Also, a new JetBlue terminal, to be built adjacent to famed architect Eero Saarinen's signature work at JFK, the vacant TWA Flight Center, is expected to open in 2008.
    Detroit. Northwest's big new "WorldGateway" terminal is just 3 years old, but it is already being expanded. Airport authorities are planning another new terminal for the other carriers there.
    Chicago. The city has dramatically rehabbed the terminal at its close-in Midway Airport, and it is proceeding with controversial plans to expand the giant O'Hare airport.</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></TD></TR><TR class=sidebar><TD vAlign=top></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></TD></TR><TR><TD class=notch_header height=1></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>

    But in the short run, the renaissance in terminal construction has created a capacity glut that is burdening the financially struggling airlines whose airport rental payments are financing the boom. Two of the USA's biggest airlines — United and US Airways — are operating in bankruptcy protection. Delta and Northwest have warned of possible bankruptcy filings; American narrowly avoided a Chapter 11 filing in 2003. Rent increases related to new terminal construction are making profitability all the more elusive.

    "The airports that decided to build in the great years of the late 1990s are seeing (their projects) come on line at a bad time," says airport consultant Oris Dunham. Still, Dunham says, many airports desperately need new terminals to meet passenger growth and replace outdated facilities. Because it can take nearly a decade to move from initial plans to completed terminals, they can't wait for the next up-cycle to begin building. After a quarter-century lull, dozens of large and midsize cities have opened, or soon will open, impressive terminals.

    In addition to Dallas/Fort Worth, big airport projects are underway or recently completed in Boston, Miami, New York (John F. Kennedy), Detroit, Chicago (Midway), Los Angeles, Phoenix, Sacramento and Seattle. The government expects passenger numbers in the USA to nearly triple by 2030, to 1.95 billion annually. But it's not just the increase in passengers that airports are attempting to accommodate. Cities are building outsized terminals in a bid to make their airports bigger engines of economic growth.

    It's a strategy loaded with risk at a time when most airlines are reporting huge losses. If big airline tenants pull out, or use the bankruptcy laws to escape their obligation to finance the new terminal spaces, communities and airport authorities could be stuck with white-elephant terminals, hundreds of millions of dollars in construction bonds, or both.

    <TABLE class=sidebar cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 align=left border=0><TBODY><TR><TD></TD><TD rowSpan=4></TD></TR><TR><TD class=sidebar align=right>Tony Gutierrez, AP</TD></TR><TR><TD class=sidebar>Skylink: The world's largest airport train gets one more stop at Terminal D.</TD></TR><TR><TD></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>

    Building terminals requires a partnership between airlines and airport authorities. Sometimes airlines specifically ask for a terminal. Other times the airport asks carriers to pledge their support for a new facility. But either way, airports recover costs by increasing rents. In theory, those higher rents should be passed along to consumers in higher ticket prices. In reality, airlines often end up swallowing higher rents because competition is so fierce. So airlines tend to embrace new terminals, and the costs that come with them, the same way one embraces a porcupine — very cautiously, if at all.

    Inflation of costs

    At Seattle-Tacoma airport, a new concourse and terminal have opened in the past year to good reviews from travelers and architecture critics. But tenants are complaining publicly that construction, financing and extra security will push their operating costs there through the roof.

    Costs at Sea-Tac run about $10 a passenger, up from $4 a decade ago. Sea-Tac claims it can stem the upward push and keep future costs around $15 a passenger.

    But Gary Kelly, CEO at discount king Southwest, says Sea-Tac's costs already are way too high for a carrier where the average ticket sells for just $93. He's threatening to move Southwest's Seattle base to old Boeing Field, closer to downtown, where costs would be lower and the airline would be in a better position to keep ticket prices in check. American Airlines, the world's biggest carrier, is hit particularly hard by the rent increases that accompany new terminals. It's the principal or sole tenant of the USA's three largest new terminals — Terminal D at Dallas/Fort Worth, a terminal being built at Miami, and American's new terminal at New York JFK. "All of these projects — not just those at our hubs and big airports, but all over the country — do hit us in the pocketbook," says American Senior Vice President Henry Joyner.

    American has worked with airports to hold down construction costs, he says. After the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, it worked with New York airport officials to scale back the new JFK terminal, which was already under construction. It dropped plans for a new terminal at Boston, where construction had yet to begin. Along with other carriers, it withdrew support for new terminals in San Jose, Calif., and San Diego.

    Whether a terminal project makes economic sense to the airline, Joyner says, depends on whether the anticipated fare revenue gained from higher customer demand is likely to offset the higher cost of operating at the airport.

    Reason for redesign

    Accommodating passenger growth and promoting economic development are not the only reasons for the renaissance in terminal construction. Other factors:

    •Obsolescence. Many terminals date back to the dawn of the jet age and are showing their age, says architect David Lind, whose firm, Corgan Associates, has designed terminals at Dallas/Fort Worth, Miami, Sacramento and elsewhere.

    "A whole lot of airports around the country have these 40- and 50-year-old terminals that are near the end of their useful lives," Lind says.

    •Security. Post-9/11 security measures have forced airports to modify terminals to accommodate new equipment and bigger screening checkpoints. But the modifications are mostly stopgap. Newly designed terminals are the best solution.

    •Low-cost carriers. As big airlines pare operations to compete with discounters, space needs are changing. A cost-saving move to automated ticketing kiosks and Internet check-in means the airlines no longer need dozens of ticket-counter positions. That space can be used for better-designed checkpoints and for more and bigger restaurants to feed travelers who are spending more time at the airport and getting less food on flights.

    William Fife, director of aviation services at New York architecture firm DMJM Harris, says newly designed terminals offer the possibility of more-efficient airline operations and, therefore, more savings. Example: Sophisticated new baggage systems that are impractical in existing terminals could process twice as many bags in a third less time.

    Risk of overcapacity

    Dallas/Fort Worth's Terminal D, part of a $2.7 billion airport expansion that is Texas' biggest construction project ever, is creating similar, though less-severe, cost problems to those in Seattle.

    Dallas/Fort Worth CEO Jeff Fegan says tenant airlines' cost per passenger will nearly double to $8.93 when the terminal opens. That's a middle-of-the-pack figure compared with other major airports. But Dallas/Fort Worth no longer will be the bargain for carriers that it has been.

    If higher rent limits the growth of air service, it could mean trouble for Dallas/Fort Worth, which finds itself with an excess-capacity problem that wasn't anticipated when work began on Terminal D.

    When construction started five years ago, all of Dallas/Forth Worth's existing gates were full. The new terminal was viewed as a relief valve for the mounting pressure on airport facilities. It was also viewed as an engine of economic development for a region intent on becoming a first-tier player in international trade. But terrorism, recession and soaring fuel costs have intervened.

    In January, Delta closed its 25-year-old Dallas/Fort Worth hub. Currently, 19 of 37 gates in its old Terminal E are empty, and more will be emptied when some remaining carriers there move into the new Terminal D. When the terminal opens, airlines will use nearly all its gates, but the facility will operate at only about 50% of capacity.

    On top of that, American Airlines and its regional partner, American Eagle, have streamlined their hub operations and no longer use 19 of their 116 gates. Fegan says it could take five years or longer before all of Dallas/Fort Worth's gates are fully employed. The addition of flights by other airlines has greatly softened the blow from Delta's departure, he says. Still, the Dallas/Fort Worth situation shows that airports can no longer assume that their hub status is a given.

    It's not unusual for airlines to shrink or close a hub, leaving airports vulnerable to overcapacity. US Airways has pulled out of Baltimore/Washington and Pittsburgh and scaled back at Washington Reagan National Airport. America West closed its Columbus, Ohio, hub two years ago.

    Pittsburgh's $1 billion midfield terminal, opened in 1992, provides a lesson in the risks of overly ambitious building.

    Officials originally believed their market could support a 50-gate terminal, says Kent George, CEO of the Allegheny County Airport Authority. At the insistence of US Airways, the project ballooned to 75 gates in the midfield terminal, plus 25 in a satellite terminal for commuter planes. But US Airways shrank its Pittsburgh hub after the 9/11 attacks, then pulled the plug on it last year. The carrier went from more than 510 departures a day to 230.

    "Now I'm going to run 12 million to 14 million passengers a year through facilities designed for 32 million," George says. Many of the 70 gates being used at the midfield terminal are running at half capacity. The 25-gate commuter terminal sits empty.

    The loss of the US Airways hub has been offset to a degree by the entry of low-cost carriers AirTran and Southwest. Other carriers have added flights since US Airways closed its hub. And George expects to have the construction bonds paid off by 2016.

    The lesson of Pittsburgh, George says, is to build only for foreseeable needs. Extra facilities — additional gates, hangars, cargo facilities — should be funded independently by the carriers that will use them, he says. "That protects your community's financial interests."

    But rewards can be great for communities that plan and build airports as engines of economic growth. Since Dallas/Fort Worth opened in 1974, the Dallas/Fort Worth area has developed into one of the USA's largest and fastest-growing business markets, largely because of its superior air service.

    Fegan, who made the decision to proceed with Terminal D's construction only a few weeks after 9/11, says the new terminal, with a 12-story Grand Hyatt Hotel growing right out of its ticketing lobby, can have just as big an impact on the region's future. By 2030, North Texas' population is expected to top 9 million, a 50% increase from today.

    "The real question isn't 'Can we afford to build this new terminal?' " Fegan says. "It's 'Can we afford not to build it?

  42. #192
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    Did anybody see the hour long special last night on channel 5 about terminal D?

  43. #193
    Mile-High Skyscraper Member rantanamo's Avatar
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    yup, much more optimistic than I had really thought about the terminal. Makes the airport seem like an entirely different place.

  44. #194
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    So the terminal opened as scheduled this morning? I heard the first flight in was Mexicana followed by Korean Air.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rantanamo
    yup, much more optimistic than I had really thought about the terminal. Makes the airport seem like an entirely different place.
    I'm not going to lie. I do wish the new terminal "fit in" better with the airport. But then, that gives the opportunity to renovate the old terminals, again.

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    Impressed :)

    I had an opportunity to check Terminal D on opening day and all I can say is I was quite impressed. It is really is modern and sleek. I think this puts us above Atlanta and Houston (size wise of course until we get more International carriers). I can definitely see it in the near future filled with at least a dozen foreign carriers. I almost thought I was in the Tom Bradley International Terminal @ LAX or JFK.

  47. #197
    High-Rise Member TexasPlus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tnekster
    So the terminal opened as scheduled this morning? I heard the first flight in was Mexicana followed by Korean Air.
    We came back BA/AA from Amsterdam Sunday afternoon the 24th.
    Still had to use the old A terminal.

  48. #198
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    <TABLE cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%" border=0><TBODY><TR><TD>Posted on Mon, Aug. 08, 2005</TD><TD width=15 rowSpan=7></TD></TR><TR><TD colSpan=2></TD></TR><TR><TD colSpan=2>

    Globalgambit

    D/FW officials hope the new Terminal D will raise the airport's profile as an international gateway


    By Trebor Banstetter
    Star-Telegram Staff Writer

    <!-- begin body-content -->Joe Lopano was in Shanghai five years ago, extolling the virtues of Dallas/Fort Worth Airport to the chief executive of China Eastern Airlines in a bid to win new flights to the region.

    "He interrupted me, and asked if [the airport] was in Colorado," said Lopano, the airport's executive vice president of marketing. "It shows the challenge you sometimes face in educating people about D/FW."

    North Texas' low international profile, compared with cities like New York and Chicago, is one of many challenges officials face as they labor to attract new flights to foreign destinations.

    The airport's international reach is also affected -- both good and bad -- by geography, local demographics, the financial condition of the airline industry, and its major tenant, American Airlines.

    But airport officials say they can't afford to lose despite the obstacles.

    Expanding service to foreign cities is crucial for D/FW's brand new, $1.2 billion international terminal, which opened last month. The terminal was designed to quickly process passengers traveling to and from foreign countries. Foreign carriers are using it now; American is scheduled to move in next month.

    Airport officials have an ambitious vision. They have targeted dozens of cities worldwide for new service, ranging from Auckland, New Zealand, on the other side of the globe, to Monclova, Mexico, just across the border. Although many travelers in the new terminal will initially be on domestic flights, airport officials hope to eventually fill the 2 million-square-foot facility entirely with international passengers.

    "It's a top priority," Lopano said.

    Nonetheless, the airport clearly has some catching up to do. Although No. 3 in the world in total takeoffs and landings, D/FW lags behind many other U.S. airports in international service, according to the U.S. Department of Transportation.

    The airport in January 2005 ranked 10th in total passengers on international routes, behind smaller airports like Miami, Houston Bush and Newark Liberty, according to the latest government data.

    Snaring a substantial amount of service won't be easy. Flights to many countries are governed by international treaties, with new routes added only after years of negotiations.

    And although major U.S. airlines have been beefing up international service, much of that growth remains focused on the traditional gateway cities such as New York and Los Angeles.

    But some progress has been made. About 5.6 million international passengers are expected to fly from D/FW this year, up nearly 10 percent from last year and ahead of pre-9-11 levels, according to airport statistics.

    And in the past year, the airport has gained service to six new foreign markets: Osaka, Japan, and five cities in Mexico.

    Experts say new aircraft technology, demographic changes and North Texas growth patterns could help the airport eventually realize its aspiration of becoming a true international gateway.

    Lopano provided a list of 37 more cities airport officials hope to eventually serve, in nations including Mexico, China, Iceland and the United Arab Emirates.

    One top priority: Convincing Spanish carrier Iberia Airlines to connect D/FW and Madrid. "We think that would be a very good market for us," he said.

    But most caution that the ambitious growth plan won't come overnight.

    "In the long run, I expect D/FW to catch up with some of the other big airports," said Alan Sbarra, an aviation consultant with Roach and Sbarra Airline Consulting in San Francisco. "But it will probably take some time."

    Historical shackles

    Historically, one of D/FW's chief problems in attracting flights to Europe and Asia has been geography. Flights from either coast are shorter, making service to cities like New York and San Francisco easier.

    Even today, of the top 10 airports for international service, only three -- Chicago, Houston and D/FW -- are in the nation's center.

    D/FW does have one geographic advantage, and that's on flights to Latin America. But the airport's largest tenant, American Airlines, already operates a Latin American hub in Miami.

    "Miami is a special case, it's the capital of Latin America," Sbarra said. "American can tap into an enormous business and leisure market by flying out of that city."

    So there is little advantage for American to connect passengers to Latin America through D/FW, he said.

    Miami, in fact, is American's No. 1 international airport. The airline flew more than twice as many passengers to foreign destinations from Miami than D/FW in January 2005, the most recent statistics available, according to the Transportation Department.

    Houston, meanwhile, has become the primary Texas gateway to the region, largely because Continental Airlines flies most of its Latin American routes from its hub at Bush.

    "Both Houston and Miami have become the major Latin American gateways," said Mike Boyd, an airline consultant with the Boyd Group of Evergreen, Colo. Both of those cities also have larger Hispanic populations, Boyd noted, which provides strong local demand for travel as well.

    In Houston, 12 foreign carriers offer service, and 34 fly out of Miami. Seven serve D/FW.

    Chicago, meanwhile, was chosen by American for its first nonstop flight to China, which will debut next year. American chose that city in part because it can fly the route north, over the polar region, into Asia. From D/FW, the same flight would be much longer.

    American also recently added service to Delhi, India, from Chicago.

    The airline continues to fly more international flights from D/FW than Chicago, where it operates a smaller hub. But Chicago overall is a much larger international airport compared with D/FW, ranked fourth in the nation according to the Transportation Department, with overseas service by numerous foreign and domestic carriers.

    Growth ahead?

    D/FW officials are determined to change that. They point to a 10 percent increase in international service over the past five years.

    A host of new cities have been added during the past year. They are largely in Mexico but include Osaka, the second-largest city in Japan. Mexicana Airlines began service from two cities this summer.

    Much of the growth to Mexico has been driven by the growing Hispanic population, said Lisa Bailey, a spokeswoman for American Eagle, American Airlines' regional affiliate.

    Eagle operates many of the new flights to smaller Mexican cities.

    "The Hispanic community has an ever-increasing economic influence, and they're an important customer base," she said. "There is a lot of support locally to expand service to Mexico."

    Some routes, such as Torreσn and San Luis Potosi, are also getting a lot of business traffic, she said.

    Mexico isn't the only growth region. German carrier Lufthansa is the largest foreign carrier at D/FW, and it has seen strong growth locally, said Karl Lehman, the airline's sales manager for the southern United States.

    "The last few years are the best we've ever had in this market," said Lehman, who is based in Dallas. He said growth has been pushed by business demand for flights to India, Asia and the Middle East by such area companies as Texas Instruments, Perot Systems and Exxon Mobil.

    Lufthansa has a daily flight to its hub in Frankfurt, Germany, and can connect passengers to cities worldwide from there.

    The strength of the hub also works for D/FW, officials here say.

    The airport's status as American's largest U.S. hub is a major selling point to foreign carriers that partner with American in the eight-airline Oneworld alliance.

    For example, the much-coveted Iberia, which is an alliance member, could fly passengers from Madrid to D/FW, then connect them to American flights to cities across the nation. The same seamless connection could work with Irish carrier Aer Lingus, Chilean airline Lan, Hong Kong carrier Cathay Pacific and others.

    Europe and Asia are also closer than ever, thanks to new aircraft technology. The latest generation of planes can fly much longer trips, making destinations across the Atlantic and Pacific more feasible.

    American officials have hinted that D/FW could be the starting point for a nonstop flight to China sometime in the next few years. The airline is lobbying for permission to launch new service under a new aviation treaty, and have named D/FW as a potential city.

    Consultant Boyd even envisioned a time when D/FW could be a stopping point between Asia and Latin America.

    "American Airlines has huge ambitions in Asia, and it already is a major player in Latin America," he said. "D/FW is the logical point for American to connect travelers between them."

    A passenger could board in Shanghai, he said, fly nonstop to D/FW, then connect to a flight to Sao Paulo, Brazil.

    D/FW has also seen growth in international cargo service, with nonstop cargo flights to China, Hong Kong and Amsterdam, Netherlands. Since 1993, the airport's international cargo service has more than tripled.

    That can help boost international passenger service, Lopano said, because the cargo runs foster business ties between the cities and spur demand for new commercial flights.

    One of those success stories? China Eastern, the airline whose chief didn't realize that D/FW was in Texas. After three years of lobbying, the airline agreed to begin nonstop cargo service to Shanghai.

    "They figured us out and realized this was a good place for them to be," Lopano said. "And we're confident others will make the same decision."

    IN THE KNOW

    International gateways

    The top 10 airports, ranked by number of passengers flying to international destinations in January 2005.


    <TABLE class=story-table border=0><TBODY><TR class=story-table-even-row><TD>Airport</TD><TD>Passengers</TD></TR><TR class=story-table-odd-row><TD>Los Angeles Airport</TD><TD>686,730</TD></TR><TR class=story-table-even-row><TD>John F. Kennedy Airport, New York</TD><TD>663,109</TD></TR><TR class=story-table-odd-row><TD>Miami Airport</TD><TD>641,273</TD></TR><TR class=story-table-even-row><TD>O'Hare Airport, Chicago</TD><TD>399,700</TD></TR><TR class=story-table-odd-row><TD>Newark, N.J., Liberty Airport</TD><TD>329,759</TD></TR><TR class=story-table-even-row><TD>San Francisco Airport</TD><TD>297,818</TD></TR><TR class=story-table-odd-row><TD>Hartsfield Atlanta Airport</TD><TD>276,170</TD></TR><TR class=story-table-even-row><TD>George Bush Airport, Houston</TD><TD>273,683</TD></TR><TR class=story-table-odd-row><TD>Honolulu Airport</TD><TD>230,118</TD></TR><TR class=story-table-even-row><TD>Dallas/Fort Worth Airport</TD><TD>184,803</TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>SOURCE: U.S. Department of Transportation traffic reports, January 2005

    CHARTS: D/FW's foreign markets; Wish list; International service; STAR-TELEGRAM DEWUAN X. DAVIS

    <!-- end body-content --><!-- begin body-end --><HR class=tagline color=#cccccc SIZE=1>

    </TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>
    By the power of greyskull!

  49. #199
    High-Rise Member TexasPlus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Geaux Tigers
    The terminal was designed to quickly process passengers traveling to and from foreign countries. Foreign carriers are using it now; American is scheduled to move in next month.
    We came back on BA/AA from Amsterdam July 24th the day after D opened and had to use the old A terminal. We are flying AA out tomorrow August 12th to Antigua for a weeks sailing. I just checked on gate assignments. The flight still is using the old terminal A.

    Sigh, At least I know why now. I would have thought that AA would have been the first one operating out of the new digs.

  50. #200
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    Quote Originally Posted by TexasPlus
    Sigh, At least I know why now. I would have thought that AA would have been the first one operating out of the new digs.
    Yes, what's up with that? Not enough time to prepare? All this talk about terminal D being the future of AA and they are not even using it yet?

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