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Thread: Ikea in Dallas?

  1. #1
    High-Rise Member dallastophoenix's Avatar
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    Ikea in Dallas?

    Did anyone catch the blurb on p.8 of the DBJ about Ikea coming to town? I read about it online under "retail realty redux " (p.2 online).

    "It's easy for chains in the Metroplex to expand here because they already have distribution, management and advertising infrastructure in place. Dallas-Fort Worth also is one of the first markets retailers turn to when rolling out new concepts.

    Lieberman named **** IKEA ****, Conn's and 99 Cents Only Stores as stores entering the market this year. (See related story on page 8.) Existing retailers with big expansion plans include Target, Bed Bath & Beyond, Kohl's, Sports Authority and Best Buy.

    Outlying areas should continue to see strong demand, Lieberman said.

    "The suburbs are still hot," he said. "Sherman, Denton, Watauga and Burleson are all coming on strong, and there's a lot of activity in McKinney and North Richland Hills. The big-box retailers will follow the houses, and the smaller specialty stores will ride their tails."

    http://dallas.bizjournals.com/dallas...19/story2.html

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    That would be great if Ikea came. I went to the Houston store yesterday afternoon and the parking lot was completely full. Definitely a cool store.

  3. #3
    Mid-Rise Member evdallas's Avatar
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    That would be nice.

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    LH Copycat Columbus Civil's Avatar
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    It's nice furniture if you're not going to put anything over 5 pounds on top of it.

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    Mid-Rise Member evdallas's Avatar
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    not true columbus

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    LH Copycat Columbus Civil's Avatar
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    ok ok.. ten pounds.

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    Mid-Rise Member evdallas's Avatar
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    High-Rise Member dallastophoenix's Avatar
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    Okay, I finally found something online... it will still probably be 2 -3 yrs b4 we see them coming here:

    "Amid Flat Retail Sales Ikea Plans 50-Store Expansion

    CONSHOHOCKEN, Pa. -- Amid flat sales for U.S. retailers, Ikea started a major U.S. expansion Wednesday, opening a large new store three miles from where its first U.S. store opened 18 years ago.

    From a small showroom in a Swedish farm town in 1953, Ikea has become the world's largest home furnishings retailer with more than 175 stores in 31 countries. The United States, with only nine, is the next big growth target.

    Ikea plans to open 50 North American stores in 10 years, including six in the United States and three in Canada this year.

    Low prices put the Swedish furniture giant in a good position when consumers are tight-fisted, spokesman Clive Cashman said.

    "If it's an economy where maybe people are holding off on large furniture, we've got small decorative items," Cashman said. Then, with new stores in place, "We feel that we'll be in a very good position once things do come around."

    People started arriving around 1 a.m. and several hundred were waiting by 9 a.m. for the opening of the 325,000-square-foot store in suburban Philadelphia. The first 100 got a free Poang chair, a popular, colorfully padded armchair valued at $79.

    "I tried to make it in time for the Poang chair but, too late," said David Park Payne, 30, of Cherry Hill, N.J.

    Ikea's U.S. officials said they weren't apprehensive about misgivings that founder Ingvar Kamprad, 76, now honorary chairman, recently voiced about Ikea's expansion rate. Kamprad said he feared the consequences if an economic slump forced the company to close stores.

    Lars Ridoff, deputy U.S. manager, said Kamprad feared that Aelmhult, the Swedish town of 16,000 where he opened his first showroom, had become overly dependent on the furniture company. Ridoff said Kamprad didn't oppose expanding in North America.

    Ikea's sales rose nearly 22 percent to $10.3 billion in 2001, with about 286 million people visiting its stores worldwide. But its U.S. sales trail those in Germany and the United Kingdom, said Ridoff, who has previously worked for the company in Sweden, England, Switzerland and Spain.

    "There are many major markets in the United States. We've only just begun," said Pernille Spears Lopez, president of Ikea North America, which is based in Plymouth Meeting.

    Lopez sawed a log, rather than cutting a ribbon, with Sopranos star Jamie-Lynn Sigler to open the store. It is double the size of the Plymouth Meeting store that just closed.

    Ikea plans to open stores this year in Costa Mesa, Covina, and East Palo Alto, Calif.; College Park, Md., and Paramus, N.J., and next year in the Boston area and near the Mall of America in Minneapolis. The company is looking at areas including Atlanta, Florida, Dallas-Fort Worth, Phoenix and Detroit, Lopez said.

    ***btw, phx is already getting one***

    Economist Ken Mayland, president of ClearView Economics, said Ikea carves out a profitable niche with its "Scandinavian chic" despite generally flat furniture and home furnishing sales.

    "If you are going to put up that many stores over a 10-year period you should expect a slow year now and then and that shouldn't deter you," Mayland added.

    Furniture analyst Ivan Saul Cutler, of Greensboro, N.C., said part of Ikea's success involves taking some of the pain out of furniture shopping.

    "People hate to buy furniture. Ikea makes it easy. They get it now, they can touch it and feel it," Cutler said. "The stores sort of reflect the world view and lifestyle of many consumers."

    If some assembly is involved, Cutler said, people don't mind because of the lower cost.

    The store is designed to tempt people to make a day of it, with a children's play area, three dining areas -- including a hot dog, cinnamon bun and coffee counter in the checkout area -- and a grocery section offering herring, caviar and other Swedish specialties.

    "My daughter just moved into her first apartment. She wanted it to look pretty but she didn't want to break the bank," said Sherry Hirner, 55, of Broomall, as she left Wednesday with three carts of merchandise.

    Hirner also found furniture for her house. "Now that we have an empty room we're going to put bookcases in it," she said. "Our house is traditional. There's natural grains that will fit perfectly in ours."

    Kristin Hirner, 23, said she liked Ikea's designs as well as its prices.

    "I always think of furniture stores as more old-fashioned. It's more reasonably priced, and it's cute. It fits my lifestyle," she said.

    "The prices at Center City furniture stores are ridiculous," said Nicole Jacobson, 25, of Philadelphia, loading a car with boxes because, "I finally decided to have my apartment stop looking like a college dorm and look like a real apartment." (AP)"

    http://www.whdh.com/news/articles_p/business/A7906

  9. #9
    Mid-Rise Member evdallas's Avatar
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    stores entering the market this year?

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    Administrator gc's Avatar
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    Ikea plans store in Frisco

    Posted on Tue, Jan. 20, 2004
    Ikea plans store in Frisco
    By Heather Landy - Star-Telegram Staff Writer
    http://www.dfw.com/mld/dfw/business/7755996.htm

    For more than a decade, local fans of sleek Scandinavian furniture have traveled to Houston to shop at Ikea, the Swedish chain known for its massive stores and low-price, assemble-it-yourself merchandise.

    Starting next year, the trek south will no longer be necessary.

    Ikea plans to open its first North Texas store in spring 2005 on 25 acres in Frisco, near the Stonebriar Centre mall. The expansion is part of the European company's growth strategy for North America, which includes plans for five new stores annually for the next 10 years.

    The Metroplex was "a natural" for the chain, which scouts out markets with household incomes above the national average, along with growing and well-educated populations, said Doug Greenholz, real estate manager for Ikea. And with about 4 million square feet of retail space in the concentrated corridor just north of Texas 121 and east of the Dallas North Tollway, the area is a proven mecca for shoppers.

    "It's already a destination, and it's just going to become more of one with us there," Greenholz said.

    Ikea plans to close on the land purchase this spring. Construction would begin soon after, with a grand opening expected by the middle of 2005.

    The proposal, which still requires city approval, calls for a two-level, 310,000- square-foot store at Texas 121 and the tollway. The chain also plans to construct a road that would run east from the Tollway service road to Parkwood Boulevard, bringing traffic past the store entry points.

    Ikea, which has 18 stores in the United States and more than 190 worldwide, has become a regional shopping destination, drawing customers from hundreds of miles away and keeping them in the stores for two to three hours per visit.

    In New Jersey, the popularity of the Ikea near Newark Liberty Airport has prompted toll collectors to post signs outside their booths with directions from the turnpike exit to the store.

    Plans for the Frisco store include 50 showrooms, five model homes, a self-service warehouse and a section for home accessories, along with a supervised children's play area and a 300-seat restaurant serving Swedish specialties such as meatballs and salmon platters.

    The store is expected to create 400 to 500 jobs, including about 50 management positions, as well as 500 construction jobs.

    The merchandise, which includes about 10,000 items exclusively designed for Ikea, will be transported from the company's 2 million-square- foot warehouse in Southern California.

    That distribution center also serves Ikea's operation in Houston. Changes are also on the way for the Houston location, which opened in 1992. In August, the store will relocate to a new building twice the size of the current store.

    Other cities where Ikea is looking to add stores in the coming years include Atlanta; New York; Philadelphia; Tempe, Ariz.; Dublin, Calif.; New Haven, Conn.; and Somerville and Stoughton, Mass.

    Company spokesman Joseph Roth said the North Texas population probably is large enough to support as many as three Ikea stores.

    One reason the company chose Frisco as its first site in the region is that it is far enough east to leave room for growth on the other side of the Metroplex, without hurting sales at the Frisco store, he said.
    “We shape our Cities, thereafter they shape us.”

  11. #11
    crescentboi
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    I think that this is great! I absolutely love Ikea and have been to the store in Chicago and think its great. I was hoping that this would be closer to the Galleria, but they do need a lot of space to build and I don't think that's available by the Galleria. It's also nice to hear that they are moving right along with construction plans. Should be interesting to see go up. That's an absolutely huge building. Is there another building about that size that's retail that someone can think of. How big is Home Depot Expo Center? I know that it's much smaller than that, but it would be nice to get a sense of scale.

    I'm surprised that it has taken this long to get them to the Dallas area. I have quite a few Ikea items as do a few of my friends who have lofts downtown. They are great products, granted not Hendredon quality, but great prices and very attractive. I urge everyone to check out their stuff and see what I mean. You can do an entire living room for under $1200 with all accessories and furniture...EVERYTHING!! It's great.

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    High-Rise Member dallastophoenix's Avatar
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    thanks, GCarey!! i haven't been up to that area in frisco for a couple of years now, and now there's going to be an ikea there.

    and how cool that they'll eventually build another one on the west side of the metro...

    btw, more of the same info from the DMN:

    Flair and function in Frisco

    Swedish home furnishings chain Ikea, an icon among some shoppers, is bringing its modern design and bargain prices to North Texas

    Ikea-holics will travel long distances to shop for the Swedish chain's huge selection of cheap and chic home furnishings. They buy luggage to haul home their loot on airplanes or share U-haul trailers with friends. And when they move to a city without a store, they complain.

    Ikea fans in Dallas-Fort Worth can rest easier now.

    The popular retailer is coming to Frisco in mid-2005. The chain is building a 310,000-square-foot store at the northeast corner of the Dallas North Tollway and State Highway 121 near Stonebriar Centre.

    The addition of Ikea will make Frisco – already a shopping destination with more than 4 million square feet of retail space sprouting in three years – more of a ground zero for sporting shoppers.

    "We picked Frisco for the tremendous concentration of retail already there in addition to the mall. It's already a destination for retail and entertainment, and we believe it will become even more of a destination with us coming in," said Doug Greenholz, Ikea's real estate manager.

    Ikea (pronounced eye-KEE-ah), which sells inexpensive modern furniture, lamps, linens, cooking utensils, storage units, wall décor and more, designs and makes its own furniture. The retailer, which opened its first U.S. store in 1985 and has locations up and down the East and West coasts, announced an expansion last year that includes 50 new stores over the next 10 years in existing and new markets.

    Since then, developers and admirers of the chain have been seeking out the megafurniture store, which is almost twice the size of a Wal-Mart Supercenter.

    Inventive Dallasite David Grant posted an Internet petition last year that reads:

    "On behalf of the general population of Dallas and surrounding communities: We, the fans of furniture mega-store Ikea would like to make it very clear that opening an Ikea store in the Dallas metro area would be a very popular decision. Make your opinion count by signing the online petition below."

    Mr. Grant collected 877 Internet signatures, and while Ikea isn't giving him credit for its decision to open a Dallas-area store, it didn't hurt.

    "I'm not sure we've had petitions from other cities, but we get a lot of phone calls and e-mails from people asking us to build in their markets," said Ikea spokesman Joseph E. Roth.

    Ikea has been looking for a Dallas-area location for more than a year, he said. In most new markets, the chain expects to add a second or third store, but it has no local plans beyond the Frisco location right now, Mr. Greenholz said. "Getting this store built is our focus now," he said.

    The store will employ 400 to 500 people and will be built on 25 acres that Ikea is purchasing contingent to approvals from city and private entities.

    According to Ikea's economic development agreement with the city of Frisco, the retailer will spend a minimum of $40 million on the project. Frisco is giving Ikea a $1.4 million refund for a new road and a retention pond that it will build on the property as well as a share of sales taxes collected by the store over 10 years.

    Ikea stores are high-volume retailers with average U.S. store sales last year of about $85 million. The concept was founded in 1943 by Ingvar Kamprad, a 17-year-old who made pencils, stools and matchboxes on his family farm called Elmtaryd and sold them in the parish of Agunnaryd and neighboring villages in southern Sweden.

    Ikea, which is an acronym of the founder's name and those geographic roots, now operates 192 stores in 31 countries, including 18 in the United States. It had sales last year of $12.2 billion worldwide and $1.3 billion in the United States.

    The retailer warns first-timers to come prepared with a list, measurements of spaces and lots of room in the car. And it doesn't mind if it's a family affair. Strollers are provided, or parents can drop off their children at the Ikea-supervised play area.

    Mr. Roth said shoppers stay an average of two to three hours per visit. While the Ikea shopper ranges from college students on up, the typical shopper is a woman with children in her 30s.

    Ikea has also recently announced stores in Atlanta and Tempe, Ariz. In August, a bigger Ikea will open in Houston across the street from the existing location.

    "This isn't upscale furniture. People who buy this furniture are buying it because it's utilitarian, strong and value-priced," said Dave Brennan, co-director of the Institute for Retailing Excellence at the University of St. Thomas in Minnesota. "It's actually priced below market because you have to assemble it yourself."

    The news was especially welcome to legions of Ikea fans who have made the Interstate 45 pilgrimage from Dallas to Houston for years.

    "Every time I'm down there, I ask them how long will it be till you're in Dallas," said Brenda Brady, an interior architectural designer who lives in Richardson. "I'm really excited. We're kind of like an Ikea cult."

    Christy Poindexter, an interior designer in Arlington, said she recently signed Mr. Grant's online petition urging the company to come to North Texas. "I didn't really think it would happen," she said. "I'd always heard they only come to port cities."

    Ms. Poindexter said she visits Ikea at least once a year, borrowing a big SUV when she needs to haul furniture and taking her car for smaller items. "I buy everything I can," she says. "The bad part is you have to put it together."

    Taylor Lothliam, who works for an accounting firm in Dallas, rented a truck to bring bedroom furniture from Houston. "Everyone's going to go crazy here," she said. "I usually go about twice a year, and whenever my friend goes to Houston, he says, 'Do you need anything?' "

    So what's the big deal? "I love modern design, but it's a price I can afford," Ms. Lothliam said.

    Ms. Brady said she has been taking clients to the Houston store for years – even clients who can afford more expensive furniture. "It's not the money – it's the look," she said.

    Fredrik Broden, a commercial photographer in Dallas who grew up in Sweden, had an Ikea-furnished room when he was a child. Before Ikea opened in Houston, Mr. Broden said he would visit stores in Sweden and "stuff everything we could in our suitcase."

    When Ikea arrived in Houston, "we started going down with a truck," he said. "Both our kids' rooms are basically Ikea, and I've bought a lot of office stuff."

    Ikea sells some of items online and through its catalog, but Ms. Brady said shipping costs can be as much as the products themselves. "So we just hop in the car and go to Houston," she said. "If you have a Starbucks and a good CD, it's a great girl trip."


    Staff writer Steve Quinn contributed to this report.

    E-mail mhalkias@dallasnews.com

    and mprecker@dallasnews.com

  13. #13
    LH Copycat Columbus Civil's Avatar
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    "If you have a Starbucks and a good CD, it's a great girl trip."
    I can't tell you how many times I've said this to my husband on the way to Ikea.

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    High-Rise Member boozo's Avatar
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    This thread should be retitled, "Ikea in Plano?"

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    High-Rise Member dallastophoenix's Avatar
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    or Frisco...

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    Sea™ CTroyMathis's Avatar
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    http://www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?n...d=528197&rfi=6

    The Mayor of Frisco says 'lingonberries!':

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    The article states the Frisco location will leave room for another one on the western side of the Metroplex. I wonder where they have in mind for the second location.
    http://www.fortwortharchitecture.com - Architecture in Downtown Fort Worth
    http://www.fortwortharchitecture.com/forum - The Fort Worth Forum
    http://www.dallasarchitecture.info - Architecture in Downtown Dallas

  18. #18
    is gone.
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    More shopping centers, to be shat upon the praries in Fisco. May they suffer for their insolence.

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    Jealousy abounds...


    Come, see the hope for the Metroplex - Frisco!

    No crime, excellent schools, shiny new infrastructure & full of POSITIVE, can do people.


    You know, what Dallas use to be about.

  20. #20
    LH Copycat Columbus Civil's Avatar
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    Whatever.

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    Mile-High Skyscraper Member rantanamo's Avatar
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    Finally, my job has taken me to the Legacy and Stonebriar areas to see this Frisco thing for myself. My question to you Frisco Rocks is what about that area makes Frisco this great place that Dallas should be jealous of? Heck, what about it should make any other suburb jealous? I think the ballpark there is beautiful, and like the downtown plans that are coming along. But what else? I'm lost. The landscape is a dog compared to the landscape of Dallas. Heck, it's not as beautiful as places to the west along Lake Lewisville. You have cheap open land. You're close to Legacy. You have two freeways that are not finished. I guess you're close to Plano's Legacy, and you have a mall that's ok. You're celebrating Ikea, while Dallas is building multiple highrises, the nations largest urban park, just built the AAC, is revitalizing an entire downtown, just opened the Nasher, is expanding light rail, has the most affluent neighborhoods in the state, is a growing new urbanist force, and is adding more people than you are each year. I really hope this jealousy stuff is in jest because Frisco is really just mini-Arlington minus the large University and real Major League team. I'm proud of what you have as you are part of the metroplex, but you still have a long way to catch up with Plano. This is coming from someone who has walked the streets all over the metroplex.

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    Well said rantanamo!

  23. #23
    Administrator tamtagon's Avatar
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    No crime, excellent schools, shiny new infrastructure & full of POSITIVE, can do people
    That's what they said about Richardson, for a while.

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    Umm...does Arlington have a professional team? I know they have the Rangers, but surely you couldn't mean them.

  25. #25
    Mile-High Skyscraper Member rantanamo's Avatar
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    LOL. Let's put it this way, they have a professional ballpark.

  26. #26
    Mid-Rise Member evdallas's Avatar
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    Originally posted by FriscoRocks
    full of POSITIVE, can do people.


    You know, what Dallas use to be about.
    Why did you all leave Dallas then, that doesn't sound like much of a can do attitude.

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    Cheap land? $150K for a one acre lot isnt cheap and the prices are only climbing.

    Who said we left Dallas? The people moving to Frisco are for the most parts transplants from the rest of the US and many from India, China & Russia who move here for high tech jobs. They dont want to live in Dallas. I work in Dallas, drive through it every day. It is rotting from the core.

    The infrastructure is a joke. I drove along Illinois Ave. past several major intersections all the way to Duncanville Road this week. NO street signs to signify the intersection, lights were out, traffic signals were rusted and falling apart with wiring hanging from them. At the same time I hear that the city was given $40M? for two bridges across the Trinity. The city is a joke - priorities are hosed.

    Racial tension, low incomes, low home values, declining business revenue, poor business climate, bad infrastructure, highest office vacancy rate in US = DALLAS.

  28. #28
    LH Copycat Columbus Civil's Avatar
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    You forgot to mention bad school system.

  29. #29
    crescentboi
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    Well FriscoRocks, I guess you must be ignoring all the other things that are being talked about on the forum. Yes, it's true that Dallas has some areas that are not as Shinny as Frisco, but its a much older city when compared. Everything in Frisco is new, not in most of Dallas. But when you say that the city is rotting from the core, that's a joke. Have you not been downtown lately? Been to uptown lately? There's a lot of development and things are changing. Just the other day I noticed that they had painted some of the stop lights at Griffin and Ross. There are old parking lots over by Belo that have been turned into grassy areas, or have been decreased in size to allow more grass and landscaping. That to me is a sign of progress and change. The Nasher is an amazing example! A city that is rotting would not get a landmark of that magnitude. True the city may focus on certain areas, but it helps to give Dallas an overall better image, which will in the long run bring more money to the area and help fund for the repairs in the more "run-down" parts of town. Also, if you think about it...if it weren't for Dallas, Frisco would probably not be what it is today. Frisco is a SUBURB of Dallas, it lives because Dallas is here.

    Sorry for the long winded response, but I think that you seriously need to go out and look around Dallas some more, especially Uptown.

  30. #30
    Mile-High Skyscraper Member rantanamo's Avatar
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    LOL, don't make me post Frisco pics. And yes, the land is cheap. As I said before, nothing special about Frisco but open, cheap land. And I think Southlake, Irving, Coppell, north Garland, Richardson, Rockwall, Grapevine, Colleyville, etc, etc are just as good or better choices for an implant looking for middle-class suburban housing.

    I'm sure you love your town, but goodness, you have nothing more than any other suburb in Dallas. Much less than some actually.

  31. #31
    Member Bardy's Avatar
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    Originally posted by FriscoRocks
    I drove along Illinois Ave. past several major intersections all the way to Duncanville Road this week. NO street signs to signify the intersection...
    I may be totally wrong here, but, umm, isn't that area more Cockrell Hill than Dallas?

  32. #32
    Urban but not hip Jack Flack's Avatar
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    Frisco is nothing but the new Plano. Give it twenty years and the residents will be packing up and moving to the next best suburb. There isn't anything unique about Frisco that hasn't been done in the countless suburbs surrounding Dallas. It has expensive tract homes, a mall and run of the mill strip shopping centers. Once the finish wears off it won't look quite so pretty anymore.

  33. #33
    Mid-Rise Member evdallas's Avatar
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    Land is cheap for a reason. I love the strip malls in Frisco, what a concept.

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    And maybe Dallas infrastructure would be in a better shape if the citizens of Dallas weren't maintaining it for the whole metroplex.

    I am only ever on roads in Plano or Frisco on rare occassions, and I try to avoid it if all possible. Yet all those cars on the Tollway dump onto the roads of DT Dallas every day yet contribute relatively little compared to the average citizen of Dallas for upkeep of those roads...and then they have the gall to complain that the road isn't new and smooth enough.

  35. #35
    Smile... :) mikedsjr's Avatar
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    I understand why Friscorocks says what he says. Hey, I am a Suburbanite transplanted into a surburb like area of Fort Worth.

    The mindset of a suburbanite has to be changed to see the value of a better downtown Dallas before a suburbanite will ever stop bowing down to their money and the power money gives them over the lower classes.

    And you have to fault the North Texas Tollway as well. They are the leading the charge to seperate the Dallasites from the suburbs.

  36. #36
    Mile-High Skyscraper Member rantanamo's Avatar
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    Funny thing is, if money makes classes then the classes above them live in Dallas.

  37. #37
    High-Rise Member dallastophoenix's Avatar
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    Don't get me wrong, I once lived in Far North Dallas, off the tollway, and loved Plano for awhile. It was great to see new, new, new - everywhere. But after finishing undergrad, I was bored w/ those "new suburban" surroundings. DTD then became my home...

    Frisco, Grapevine, Plano... haven't we all seen the same thing over and over again? Remember all of the excitement over Grapevine Mills, "the biggest mall in TX" being built out there... then the newness wore off... Plano was once the "it" suburb of Dallas... now nearing build-out, it's taken a backseat to Frisco. Give Frisco another decade, and the spotlight will just move to another suburb full of overpriced tract homes and endless strip malls (someday turning into suburban slums - as cheap construction has overrun most of the suburbs)... You hear me out there, Prosper? You're time is coming! LOL...

  38. #38
    Smile... :) mikedsjr's Avatar
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    DtoP,

    I agree. Alot of my turn of opinion has come from moving to Arlington several years ago before i go married. And has continued to develope even more with my love for photography.

    An area like Frisco and Plano is not nearly as photogenic as Dallas. Mckinney is more photogenic than those two cities. Frisco and Plano type cities are basically tract home cities. They have no character except wealth.

    I enjoyed living in Plano when i did. They are good for kids. But the reality is they are not built for the long term answers. They are built for 20 year answers for the wealthy and then they become old cities beginning to break down.
    Last edited by mikedsjr; 30 January 2004 at 05:44 PM.

  39. #39
    Supertall Skyscraper Member psukhu's Avatar
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    I like Frisco right now, but it's a bit far from the major employment centers and entertainment districts.

    I guess it comes down to cost of living.

    There are nice areas to live from Uptown to Frisco, but the farther away from downtown the cheaper the cost of living is.

  40. #40
    Administrator gc's Avatar
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    I didn't mean to stoop to this level....and it has nothin to do wit IKEA.....but it seems the police problem is universal Frisco...

    Frisco officer held in sex assault case
    “We shape our Cities, thereafter they shape us.”

  41. #41
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    I'm thrilled that IKEA is opening in the Dallas area. I've been to the Chicago store a couple of times and was amazed - wanted everything in there! But why in FRISCO?!?!? Aargh. They should put it in a location convenient to all of DFW. I live in Arlington and went to Stonebrier Mall ONCE, just to see what it was all about. Yep, it's a nice mall but it's too damn far away. There's not a thing out there I need that I can't buy much closer to home. But now I guess I'll have to if I want IKEA. Ugh.

  42. #42
    Low-Rise Member RuggerAl's Avatar
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    What the burbs should also see is that withougt Dallas you have what? it is Called D-FW for a reason. Each city relies on the other for job creation, security and many other things. To single Dallas out well that isn't fair compare apples to apples. I mean you try covering a city as large as dallas with a million people and see what happens. Same thing in Frisco, as population and building continue it will experienve growing pains. How all cities respond to those pains determines if it will be fair or not. Each city in the area has tons to contribute to each other from arts to education to recreation. I say talk up Frisco and Dallas because if it hadn't been for the begining where would Frisco be.... As Dallas grows and prospers so will the area. Pretty soon we will refer to the north as Collin county like we do for Cali's orange county area... too hard to say Plano, McKinney, Allen, the Colony and whatever else grows on up there.

  43. #43
    LH Copycat Columbus Civil's Avatar
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    I'm thrilled that IKEA is opening in the Dallas area. I've been to the Chicago store a couple of times and was amazed - wanted everything in there! But why in FRISCO?!?!? Aargh. They should put it in a location convenient to all of DFW.
    Isn't the Chicago store actually located in Schaumburg? That's about as far from Chicago as Frisco is from Dallas.

  44. #44
    Mid-Rise Member chiboi's Avatar
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    As for the infrastructure of Dallas rotting from the core...take a trip to NYC, the greatest city and the world and you will see infrastructure rotting from the core...or for the transplants that "don't want to live in Dallas" they should try a quick trip into the heart of Moscow, Mumbai or Beijing. For a major US city, the infrastructure is quite modern and constantly being repaired and modernized. Our rail system is a shining example of Dallas's dedication to reinventing itself, being the first city in the Southwest with rail. Place Frisco in the middle of west Texas, and not attached to a great city and I doubt it would be so attractive to live there.

  45. #45
    Supertall Skyscraper Member TexasStar's Avatar
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    Quote from FriscoReeks:
    ...They dont want to live in Dallas. I work in Dallas,
    drive through it every day. It is rotting from the core.
    Oh well, it's like I always say -- one man's rot is another man's treasure.

    And I do hope you find a job near your home so you can stop driving through our "rotting" city.
    I promise you I won't ever be driving through yours. If I did I'd be tempted to toss some of our trash onto your smooth, immaculately kept boulevards.

  46. #46
    Mid-Rise Member chiboi's Avatar
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    let me know when Frisco gets a "W" Hotel...then we will know you have really arrived since these hotels are only built in what are considered the most vibrant, hip cities around. Now you do have that nice but very suburban Westin, so for now you will have to be content.

  47. #47
    Supertall Skyscraper Member psukhu's Avatar
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    It seems that a few shiny new suburbs are spawned in DFW every decade.

    Does someone know a time line of when other DFW suburbs were hot in the past?

    Can anyone guess about what will be hot from 2010 to 2020?

  48. #48
    Administrator tamtagon's Avatar
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    All of the mid-cities will be hot during 2010-2020, as well as any community in the southern half of Denton and Collin counties. McKinney and Denton will delay the northward expansion for at least a decade as the Metroplex "fills in" with more centrally located neighborhoods becoming more profitable and popular among homeowners. The award winning suburban development model putting Plano and Frisco on the map will transform. Without the simple luxury of converting the open prairie into a city, the next suburban super star cities will emerge through existing towns currently managing large geographic areas made up of neighborhoods, shopping centers and pockets of rural acerage. The complications masterplans will encounter while incorporating the new into the old city will be balanced as it will be unnecessary to also develop a new job center. By fine-tuning the relationship between neighborhoods and their supportive shopping centers, DFW suburban cities will continue to be award winning examples during 2010-2020.

    While the largest growth percentage will be in cities of NE Tarrant and S Denton counties, Dallas and Fort Worth will realize the largest numerical population growth. Fort Worth is poised to the leading city among city planning theorist, within the city's borders are expansive tracts of rural acerage. Dallas is in the position to become a city planning celebrity and see a population increase over 500,000 by 2020. As inner city Dallas yearns to evolve into a premier North American urban area, the city will prompt high density development through improved infrastructure and recreational areas - that is, eliminate the need for a car any where near the CBD, convert a lazy flood zone into a giant park, and revive year-round entertainment in Fair Park.

  49. #49
    Mile-High Skyscraper Member rantanamo's Avatar
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    Don't underestimate the areas starting Northeast, east and southeast of Dallas. Places like Celina and Prosper were expected to be hot, but instead its Rockwall, Fate, Heath, Wylie, Sachse, north east Richarson and North and east Garland(yes, two inner ring suburbs were mentioned) The forgotten factors besides the huge open land areas were the expanding and Revitalization of the downtown Dallas area, Rockwall's growing industrial parks, the eastward expanding Telecom Corridor and SH 190 and its expansion towards I-30. That area is simply booming for those that haven't spent much time there. I would assume the population in Garland is actually growing at a good clip again because of all the new apts and subdivisions going up in north and east Garland.

  50. #50
    High-Rise Member dallastophoenix's Avatar
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    very true, rantanamo... the estern part of the metro is growing every bit as fast as frisco/mckinney... although the retail and business sector has been slow to respond in the eastern cities, the disposable income is incredible (in fact, town east mall is consistently posting double digit sales increases year after year, far surpassing the northern malls' sales increases).

    I talked to my mom not that long ago about why she and my father chose to buy a house in duncanville, rather than plano/richardson, way back in the early 70's... she said that at the time, d'ville was very desirable - with excellent schools. She moved 10 years ago, mainly b/c of the rapid increase in crime down there...

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