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Thread: DFW wants to be the premier airport in the global marketplace

  1. #351
    High-Rise Member AndyIvey's Avatar
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    I will try my best to make these points without mentioning the Wright Amendment as that is not the point of this thread.

    I am guessing that the following statements are not great points of controversy for the group:
    -Connecting flights benefit the economy by increasing employment at DFW.
    -The fees collected for connecting flights cover costs and are not a source of profit for the airlines or airport.

    Assuming that the above statements are true, what about:
    -The employment provided by connecting flights has less of a positive impact on the local economy than money spent by passengers that treat DFW as a final destination (tourists). I will call these “Destination Flights.”
    -The Convention and Visitors Bureau along with the image of the metroplex have a greater impact on the number of “Destination Flights” than the quality of DFW. This is more important than the cost of each flight.

    To bring it all together:
    -If AA reduced the number of flights out of DFW and new routes by other airlines offset that reduction, the total number of people employed would not change.
    -If the above scenario resulted in lower prices, would Dallas not become somewhat more popular for “Destination Flights?”
    -If the lower prices created by the above scenario resulted in more flights out of DFW, would the total number of people employed by the airport and its carriers not increase?


    Lowering prices at DFW by increasing competition would lower the profit per flight, but would also increase the total number of flights. The fees associated with each flight would not change. Therefore, connection-oriented employment would increase as well as the number of “Destination Flights” and passengers.

  2. #352
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndyIvey
    I will try my best to make these points without mentioning the Wright Amendment as that is not the point of this thread.

    I am guessing that the following statements are not great points of controversy for the group:
    -Connecting flights benefit the economy by increasing employment at DFW.
    -The fees collected for connecting flights cover costs and are not a source of profit for the airlines or airport.

    Assuming that the above statements are true, what about:
    -The employment provided by connecting flights has less of a positive impact on the local economy than money spent by passengers that treat DFW as a final destination (tourists). I will call these “Destination Flights.”
    -The Convention and Visitors Bureau along with the image of the metroplex have a greater impact on the number of “Destination Flights” than the quality of DFW. This is more important than the cost of each flight.

    To bring it all together:
    -If AA reduced the number of flights out of DFW and new routes by other airlines offset that reduction, the total number of people employed would not change.
    -If the above scenario resulted in lower prices, would Dallas not become somewhat more popular for “Destination Flights?”
    -If the lower prices created by the above scenario resulted in more flights out of DFW, would the total number of people employed by the airport and its carriers not increase?


    Lowering prices at DFW by increasing competition would lower the profit per flight, but would also increase the total number of flights. The fees associated with each flight would not change. Therefore, connection-oriented employment would increase as well as the number of “Destination Flights” and passengers.
    Exactly! That is basicly what I have been saying. I am confident that this scenario will play out at DFW once AA gets more competition in this market. It will happen. In the years to come there will be more flights from more carriers to more places and more people flying in and out of DFW.

  3. #353
    Administrator tamtagon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by F4shionablecHa0s
    What incentive would United or another carrier have to serve routes AA abandoned out of DFW? The whole purpose of the hub system is that these routes are made pointless.

    Maybe if AA reduced frequency on DFW-Chicago, United would pick up the slack, but on routes where there is no hub at the other end it just doesn't make financial sense for another carrier to pick up the route.

    I do think that DFW-Asia is going to explode in the upcoming years.
    Capturing all new Asian destinations should be the goal and top priority for DFW airport. The airport recruiters should only focus on AA competitors, treating AA's expansion as a given.

    With as much potential as there is with Asian markets, there's almost as much potential for DFW among European markets. DFW needs frequent non-stop access to the all major European markets as much, if not more, as it needs emerging Asian markets. Business is business and it would be much easier for AA's domestic competitors to succeed at DFW with pervasive access to Europe as well as the Pacific Rim.
    Last edited by tamtagon; 09 February 2006 at 09:05 AM.

  4. #354
    In the O.R. Geaux Tigers's Avatar
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    I'd also say a top priority should be to expedite as rapidly as possible Qantas' purchase of the 787 and 777LR aircraft from Boeing. I forsee DFW becoming the next LAX for Qantas and possibly some day replacing LAX as their main North American hub.
    By the power of greyskull!

  5. #355
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    At this point DFW is just beginning to establish itself as an international hub. International passenger growth is one of the few things DFW has going for it. Aiports like JFK, ORD, LAX, MIA just to name a few have service from several international carriers. DFW is perfectly positioned for this growth with the addition of skylink and Terminal D. Give it a few years and we will gradually see more and more non-stop international destinations out of DFW.

  6. #356
    Administrator tamtagon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Geaux Tigers
    Qantas' purchase of the 787 and 777LR aircraft
    Quote Originally Posted by FortWorthGuy
    DFW is perfectly positioned for this growth with the addition of skylink and Terminal D. Give it a few years and we will gradually see more and more non-stop international destinations out of DFW.
    word

    ...and the more new generation great big planes that get put in service the more DFW will become primary destination for international flights.
    ...and the Port of Houston's agile port in Dallas County will strengthen DFW, domestically and internationally, as the Metroplex becomes the next nationally influential marketplace.

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    Has Air India announced Houston vs Dallas yet?

  8. #358
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    I think if there is more competition in this market that DFW will gradually close the gap on ORD and ATL and become the worlds busiest airport. I also think that DFW will be in the top 5 of non-stop international and domestic markets served.

  9. #359
    Administrator dfwcre8tive's Avatar
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    Pepsi Playscapes Land At DFW International Airport
    Family-friendly areas make travel easier; Pepsi Bottling sponsorship expands

    DFW INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT, (February 2, 2006) –

    Kids will have two new “Landing Zone” play areas at DFW International Airport this summer. The Pepsi Bottling Group (PBG) will spend $190,000 for the installation of the new “Landing Zones” in Terminal B and C that will total almost 1300 square feet. “Pepsi is actually going to install two new ‘runways’ inside of Terminal B and C to allow our youngest passengers a chance to take-off,” said Ken Buchanan, executive vice president of revenue management. “Where other airports have had to put their own money on the table to build the play areas, DFW has been able to negotiate the use of the play areas through our sponsorship deal with The Pepsi Bottling Group.”

    PBG's sponsorship will pay DFW $1.2 million in the first year beginning Jan. 1, 2006 and then scale up through the term of the contract with a final payment of $1.3 million. In addition to the annual guaranteed amount, the Airport also receives 40 percent of all vending revenues from the PBG contract.

    “The new facilities are made by Playtime and will include a runway, roadway, bridge, car, plane, luggage, an air traffic control tower and wall paintings to complete the Landing Zone,” said Buchanan. “We have been working very hard over the last several years to make travel much more enjoyable, bringing in new restaurants, shops, adding Skylink, International Terminal D and the Grand Hyatt and this is just the latest of the amenities our passengers have to look forward to.”

    "The creation of this ‘Landing Zone’ has been a terrific way to further our partnership with DFW," said Pat Boggs, vice president and general manager of PBG's Texas Market Unit. "Every parent knows the challenges of keeping children entertained while at an airport. The Landing Zone provides a safe and fun environment for these younger children and we're thrilled to be a part of its development."

    The Terminal B “Landing Zone” will be located at gate 12 and will consist of 685 square feet of play area which includes a bench for parents to relax and watch their children play. The floor and equipment will be covered by colorful padded material to soften the children’s playing surface. Take-offs and landings will also now take place at the “Landing Zone” that will be located in Terminal C at gate 14 and consist of 600 square feet of play area.

    Each facility will be centrally located in the terminal, near a food court and a Skylink station. In addition a hanging sign will identify the “Landing Zone” play area. The signage and play area will be co-branded by PBG and DFW. In addition to the new “Landing Zones” DFW has seen a large influx of customer amenities, including the Airport’s first children’s play area built by McDonald’s in International Terminal D. The Airport also built two performance areas for live music or other performance art at both ends of the new terminal. International Terminal D also brought with it a $6 million public art program and two 40,000 square foot concession villages that house great new restaurants and shops.

    Playtime, the makers of the play area equipment that will be installed has installed its padded floor, padded play equipment style of play areas in over 300 locations nation wide including malls and McDonald’s restaurants, DFW will become the third airport to have playtime equipment installed following Tampa International Airport and Boston Logan International Airport.

  10. #360
    High-Rise Member TexasPlus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by njjeppson
    Kids will have two new “Landing Zone” play areas at DFW International Airport this summer. The Pepsi Bottling Group (PBG) will spend $190,000 for the installation of the new “Landing Zones” in Terminal B and C that will total almost 1300 square feet. “Pepsi is actually going to install two new ‘runways’ inside of Terminal B and C to allow our youngest passengers a chance to take-off,” said Ken Buchanan, executive vice president of revenue management. “Where other airports have had to put their own money on the table to build the play areas, DFW has been able to negotiate the use of the play areas through our sponsorship deal with The Pepsi Bottling Group.”

    PBG's sponsorship will pay DFW $1.2 million in the first year beginning Jan. 1, 2006 and then scale up through the term of the contract with a final payment of $1.3 million. In addition to the annual guaranteed amount, the Airport also receives 40 percent of all vending revenues from the PBG contract.
    This is great for the kids and parents. But how can this be a cost effective way to advertise? Do they charge the public for the use of these areas? There must be something I am missing here.

  11. #361
    High-Rise Member AndyIvey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tamtagon
    ...and the Port of Houston's agile port in Dallas County will strengthen DFW, domestically and internationally, as the Metroplex becomes the next nationally influential marketplace.
    I think the port should help boost international travel through DFW.

  12. #362
    High-Rise Member TexasPlus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tnekster
    ^Scratch that, I did some looking into it. The merger has been complete for months but the two airlines will maintain seperate operating certificates for the next 2-3 years until the FAA grants approval to combine them into one. So I guess we will see both airlines for some time to come.
    http://www.teamster.org.

    US AIRWAYS MECHANICS RALLY FOR TEAMSTER REPRESENTATION
    Teamsters Announce They Have Met Card Signature Threshold Needed to Schedule Union Representation Vote

    February 13, 2006

    (Washington, DC) – US Airways mechanics from the airline’s Phoenix, Las Vegas and Charlotte sites rallied at the company’s headquarters in Tempe and in front of the US Airways terminal at Las Vegas McCarran International Airport to kick off a union election campaign to make the Teamsters their bargaining representative for the approximately 6,300 mechanics and related employees at the newly merged airline. Pro-Teamster workers have gathered enough employee signatures to easily meet the threshold required by law to file for an election.

    “Cards have poured in,” said Don Treichler, Director of the Teamsters Airline Division. “US Airways mechanics know that the Teamsters bring great contracts and strong representation for airline mechanics. Teamster contracts at Continental, UPS, AirTran and Frontier have set an industry standard for airline mechanics. These mechanics deserve the same strong representation, especially in this case where crucial workplace rights are at stake. In particular, under a Teamster contract they will retain 100 percent of their seniority.”

    America West Airlines and US Airways merged to form the fifth-largest air carrier in the country in late September. The Teamsters represent about 900 mechanics at former America West sites, while the International Association of Machinists (IAM) represents about 5,400 at the original US Airways sites, according to company records.

    The mechanics’ key issues are outsourcing of heavy maintenance work, job security, seniority, and their right to a voice in their union and workplace—as well as major giveaways in the IAM contract, bargained with US Airways under bankruptcy conditions.

    “This election is about two major goals,” said Andy Marshall, Secretary-Treasurer of Local 104 in Phoenix, Arizona. “First, the Teamsters have a deep commitment to protecting the former America West mechanics we already represent. Second, we believe we can do a lot better for those mechanics currently under the IAM contract. Under the IAM contract, their pensions have been wiped out, their sick leave has been cut, and now they can’t take vacation. My heart really goes out to them. What we can win for them will be a night-and-day contrast. The choice for mechanics is clear, and we believe that in a free election they will vote for the Teamsters.”

    Today’s deadline for card filing was set following a National Mediation Board decision on January 30, 2006, that declared that America West and US Airways were now operating as a single airline and a union election could proceed.

  13. #363
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    ^Actually, I saw one of the newly painted planes in Vegas. Mostly white with the tail being the same and the underbelly being dark blue.

  14. #364
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    Quote Originally Posted by rantanamo
    at least we see how people would really feel if there were too many highways and lanes.
    To build on the analogy, I would say a better example would be how people would feel if the state built a ten lane freeway from Dallas to Lone Oak made out of marble and granite, with the names of all the TXDOT bureaucrats etched into the sides of each overpass.

  15. #365
    Administrator dfwcre8tive's Avatar
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    Found this interesting old postcard image of DFW Airport.

  16. #366
    Moderator jsoto3's Avatar
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    Wow! I wonder if it will really ever build out like that.

  17. #367
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    Quote Originally Posted by njjeppson
    Found this interesting old postcard image of DFW Airport.
    Now THAT'S an economic engine!!!

  18. #368
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    Quote Originally Posted by jsoto3
    Wow! I wonder if it will really ever build out like that.
    Have any of you ever looked at this?


    http://www.dfwairport.com/cdp/masterplan.html

  19. #369
    Administrator dfwcre8tive's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FortWorthGuy
    Have any of you ever looked at this?


    http://www.dfwairport.com/cdp/masterplan.html
    Yeah, 250 gates by 2019. $3 billion in additions. Of course, those were pre- 9/11 changes and other events.

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    Keep Wright And This Is What You Get

    Spirit Airlines to reduce service from D/FW

    02:11 PM CST on Thursday, March 2, 2006
    By ERIC TORBENSON / The Dallas Morning News



    Spirit Airlines, which launched daily low-fare service from Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport to Fort Lauderdale, Fla., in January, will cut its frequency to two flights a week starting in May and continuing through the summer, according to D/FW officials.

    The changes reflect Spirit’s decision to retire its MD-80s faster than originally planned because the planes are not sufficiently fuel efficient. Spirit, based near Fort Lauderdale, cannot replace the departing MD-80s fast enough with new Airbus planes.

  21. #371
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    Wright is only part of the reason for the flight cuts.

  22. #372
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    March 2, 2006, 1:05PM
    (PRN) DFW International Airport to Add New Carrier and More Service to Growing Cargo Portfolio


    PRNewswire

    Air France Debut and Additional China Cargo Flights Add to Double-Digit Growth

    Rate in International Cargo

    DFW INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT, Texas, March 2 /PRNewswire/ -- DFW International Airport today announced significant new freighter service to North Texas, just as the Airport's new International Cargo Centre opens for business. Air France Cargo will land its first freighter at DFW on April 1, marking a vital addition of new European cargo service from DFW. In addition, DFW will see new cargo service from China Cargo, with two new frequencies weekly beginning in June.

    "This just makes sense for Air France," said Jean-Yves Cap, Director of Air France Cargo USA. "We did a survey of the cargo market and saw a need that we could fill. Air France will shift one of our three weekly flights from Houston to DFW."

    The new Air France flight will have an annual economic impact of $3.5 million and will arrive every Saturday from Paris Charles de Gaulle, after a stop in Mexico City. The Boeing 747-400 freighter will then leave DFW on its way back to Paris.

    "We anticipate that two-thirds of the cargo bound for Paris will originate from DFW," said Cap. "With Korean Air already flying a full cargo plane to DFW daily, we anticipate quick growth with the help of our Skyteam Cargo alliance."

    Founding Skyteam Cargo airlines are Air France, Korean, Aeromexico, and Delta Air Logistics. In the five years since its creation, the Atlanta-based group has added KLM, CSA, Alitalia, and Northwest Airlines.

    "Just one month from now DFW will finally have Air France Cargo," said Joe Lopano, executive vice president of marketing and terminal management. "We have been working to get Air France to come to DFW for years. The time is right, the market is primed and we look forward to having key new service to Europe."

    France currently accounts for 17,400 tonnes of cargo in and out of DFW annually. This new flight is expected to raise the annual tonnage by as much as 7,800 tonnes.

    "Not only does Air France provide a great opportunity for DFW to increase its service to Europe, it also opens up the airline's huge network, providing increased trade opportunities to Europe, Africa and the Middle East," said Lopano. "New service like that of Air France and China Cargo allow companies reliant on foreign goods to bring their product to market faster, cheaper and ultimately provides the customer with greater choices."

    Beginning in June, China Cargo will expand its current service to DFW with the addition of two 747 flights a week. The additional two weekly flights will begin in Shanghai, stop at DFW, then Chicago O'Hare, Beijing and finally return to Shanghai. The airline has enjoyed outstanding growth at DFW beginning in February 2004 with three MD-11 flights per week. China Cargo quickly added a fourth weekly flight and upgraded their aircraft complement to include two MD-11s and two 747s.

    DFW has seen outstanding growth over the last year, with international cargo growing at 11 percent a year and Asian cargo growth at six percent. Asian freighters will frequent DFW 35 times per week with the addition of China Cargo's two new flights representing two-thirds of DFW's international cargo. Air France's new service to DFW marks a 20 percent increase in European cargo freighters weekly.

    "China Cargo is a great airline that is really taking advantage of what DFW has to offer," said Lopano. "We have a great Airport that offers over 18,000 acres, seven runways, 3 control towers, 12 landing approaches and no restrictions on load size or when they want to arrive day or night.

    "In addition, Trammell Crow just yesterday opened International Air Cargo Centre Phase III and Logistic Centers 1, 2, and 3 on the west side of our airfield with direct access to a taxiway," added Lopano. "This new capacity helps DFW market the Airport to potential airlines, with the knowledge that they can grow their business in the same facility without having to make huge financial infrastructure investments. That really lowers the risk associated with starting new business."

    Trammell Crow's master plan provides for approximately 395,000 square feet of air cargo, logistics and freight forwarding office and warehouse space with direct and immediate access to the tarmac. DFW and Trammell Crow Company are demonstrating strong industry leadership within North America, through the successful development of the first air cargo facility designed specifically to accommodate both the Airbus A380 and Boeing 747-400F freighter aircraft.

    "The DFW project truly defines Trammell Crow Company's Global Airport Development strategy," said Steven Bradford, Principal with Trammell Crow Company. "The focus of Trammell Crow Company's airport development initiative is to serve the real estate needs of airlines, logistics companies, and their service providers by offering innovative real estate solutions at strategic locations throughout the world. Our DFW project achieves this objective."

    About DFW International Airport
    Located halfway between the cities of Dallas and Fort Worth, Texas, DFW International Airport is the world's third busiest, offering nearly 1,900 flights per day and serving 59 million passengers a year. DFW International Airport provides non-stop service to 129 domestic and 36 international destinations worldwide. For the latest news, real-time flight information, parking availability or further details regarding the many services provided at DFW International Airport, log on to http://www.dfwairport.com .

    At least cargo operations are growing. I wish some of the cargo airlines that also offer passengers service would start service at DFW. I expect they will after the Wright fight is resolved. DFW is just a boiling pot waiting to explode with substantial growth especially internationally. Its perfect positioned to handle the new planes, and provide its passengers with first rate facilities.
    Chris

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    Air France starts cargo service from D/FW Airport
    Dallas Business Journal - 3:41 PM CST Thursdayby Margaret AllenStaff Writer
    A loss for George Bush Intercontinental Airport is a gain for Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport.

    Air France on April 1 will start dedicated cargo service to D/FW, significantly increasing the airport's freighter capacity into Europe.

    Air France said it will handle the service by pulling a Boeing 747 freighter flight from Houston, according to Jean-Yves Cap, director of Air France Cargo USA, in a statement released by D/FW Airport.
    "This just makes sense for Air France," Cap said. "We did a survey of the cargo market and saw a need that we could fill. Air France will shift one of our three weekly flights from Houston to D/FW."

    Air France will arrive and depart each Saturday through D/FW. It's anticipated the new route, flying from Paris to Mexico City to D/FW, will have an economic impact of $3.1 million annually, according to Joe Lopano, executive vice president of marketing at D/FW.

    Two thirds of the freighter, which has 110 metric tons capacity, will be allocated to D-FW tonnage, Cap said.

    "We anticipate that two thirds of the cargo bound for Paris will originate from D/FW," said Cap.

    Some of the increased volume will likely be due to Air France's membership in the global SkyTeam Alliance, a partnership of nine airlines from three continents. The alliance allows the carriers more available fights and easier conections between carriers, as well as one reservation network.

    Air France at D/FW is likely to get overflow cargo trade from SkyTeam partner Korean Air, allowing it to build share in the Asian market through D/FW. Korean Air has daily cargo flights out of D/FW into Asia, and its cargo has been growing at a rate of 22 percent a year at D/FW.

    D/FW's total international air cargo has grown about 11 percent annually since 1996. About 26 percent of the total was trade with Europe. D/FW ranks seventh in the United States for non-parcel international air cargo trade, with 277,315 metric tons in 2005.

    Having service from D/FW into Paris' Roissy-Charles de Gaulle International Airport also increases the potential for trade between D/FW and Africa and the Middle East, said Lopano, citing Air France's cargo flights into those regions. D/FW's trade with the Middle East in 2005 tallied only 3 percent, and with Africa, only 1 percent.

    France is already D/FW Airport's third-largest European trading partner, according tothe airport. Only the United Kingdom and Germany have higher volumes of trade.

    According to the airport, D/FW ships 17,400 metric tons out of D/FW to France each year.

    With the addition of the Air France flight, D/FW will have six all-cargo freighters a week into Europe, Lopano said. Other European service includes Singapore Airlines' three freighters a week and Lufthansa's two freighters a week, he said.

    Nearly 30 percent of the cargo from D/FW into Europe is machinery and industrial equipment, with electrical equipment a distant second at 12 percent. The remainder of the freight is communications equipment, chemicals, perishables and food, transportation equipment, consumer goods and computers and computer equipment, according to D/FW.

    Air France cargo executives have said the airline -- in a partnership with carrier KLM Royal Dutch Airlines that excludes North America -- is making a concerted effort to beef up its cargo share.

    European carriers' market share has been shrinking the past two decades, from 45 percent to 30 percent, according to the airline's officials.

    They say the European market has strong growth prospects. Charles de Gaulle ranks second for volume among Europe's airports after Frankfurt Airport, while Amsterdam Airport Schiphol ranks third, according to Air Cargo World.

    D/FW's marketing officials have been courting Air France for some time, said Lopano. Prior to the terrorism attacks of 9/11, Air France operated commercial passenger service into D/FW for eight months. The airline stopped that service shortly after 9/11, citing low volumes. The start-up of freighter service doesn't necessarily mean passenger service will follow, but Lopano said he's hopeful.

    "We think there's also an opportunity for the passenger side," said Lopano. "They're one of our top targets."

    mallen@bizjournals.com | 214-706-7119.

  24. #374
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    More proof that competition is good. With Alliance in existence, it seems to me that DFW's game has to be sharper, and they are.

  25. #375
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    Airports of World's Busiest Airports
    Robert Malone, 03.06.06, 6:00 AM ET
    http://www.forbes.com/2006/03/03/wor...rts_print.html

    Airports handle passengers and yes, freight. Gobs and bobs of freight.

    Everything from frozen partridges (and fresh pear trees) to multi-ton steam generators, an Orca or 700,000 bottles of wine by UPS, and volumes of cheese, yogurt and electronic products from faraway Finland (or their outsourced facilities in China or Mexico), France, Greece, Taiwan and, of course, China. The airports worldwide handle passengers and cargo in ever-larger quantities. Most who know about FedEx would assume their Memphis, Tenn., hub would rank high in cargo handling. It does. It is the highest in the world in the amount of cargo handled. And if anyone wonders why Louisville, K.Y. is No.11 in the world, they should recall it is the main air hub for UPS, whose other hubs also rank high, such as Dallas (No.25 in the world). One of the big issues in the airline world is hubs and where they should be located. Many cities would like their airport to have a cargo hub, along with the jobs and income derived from such a facility.

    Making such a choice involves a host of issues. Many companies would like to choose a hub position that is in a reasonable location and the shortest distance to its multiple markets. The preferences of cities do not always match the needs of carriers or manufacturers or retailing establishments. "There are many metrics involved in choosing a place for a hub," says Brandon Fried, executive director of the Airforwarders Association. "The first involves availability. Many airports are over-taxed like Los Angeles. Other cities are, on the other hand, begging for cargo business." In the Midwest, for instance, Chicago may be out of the question, so UPS chose Rockford as a hub. Other metrics involve the economics of local or regional costs, or positioning for traffic with China. Not all cities find the idea of cargo planes with all-night landings and takeoffs appealing. This comes down to "nimby" or "not in my back yard."

    It is interesting to see those airports that rank high in both passengers and freight: Los Angeles, Paris' Charles De Gaulle and Frankfort. And also interesting to see those that rank high in one and low in another category: Atlanta is No.1 in passengers but a mere No.23 in freight. Dallas-Fort Worth is No.6 in passengers and only No.25 in freight. London's Heathrow is No.3 in passengers and does not make the top 30 in freight. Chicago's O'Hare that tries most passengers' patience is No.2 in passengers and just No.15 in freight. It is worth noting that five out of 12 of the largest passenger handling airports are in the U.S. While in the cargo category, six of the top 12 are U.S.-based. The biggest surprise is the status of Anchorage, Alaska. It's the fourth largest cargo airport. The reason is a single word: China. The China air cargo trade is booming, and Anchorage has become a hub for many of the integrated express carriers like UPS and FedEx.

    Airports were not originally designed for cargo, nor were the planes that landed at them. The planes at first had side loading that's awkward at best and still is. Many freight carriers today have noses that open. These can swallow all the offering of a full forklift, while disgorging the same cargo at the other end with dispatch. The International Air Transport Association sees the growth between 2005 and 2009 hovering around 6% worldwide with slightly more in Asia, with less in Latin America and Africa. Since the placement of hubs is already difficult, times ahead may call for far more funding. Planning and execution help make the world's supply chain run smoothly.

    The 12 largest cargo airports in the world are:

    Airport Metric tons handled (2004)
    1. Memphis 3,554,575

    2. Hong Kong 3,119,008

    3. Tokyo (Narita) 2,375,133

    4. Anchorage 2,252,911

    5. Seoul 2,133,444

    6. Los Angeles Inter. 1,913,676

    7. Paris (Charles De Gaulle) 1,876,980

    8. Frankfurt 1,838,894

    9. Singapore 1,795,646

    10. Miami 1,778,902

    11. Louisville 1,739,492

    12. New York (JFK) 1,706,468

    The 12 largest passenger traffic airports
    (passengers in 2004
    source: Airports Council International)

    Airport Annual passenger traffic

    1. Atlanta (Hartsfield-Jackson) 83,578,906

    2. Chicago (O'Hare) 75,373,888

    3. London (Heathrow) 67,343,960

    4. Tokyo (Haneda) 62,320,968

    5. Los Angeles International 60,710,830

    6. Dallas-Forth Worth International 59,412,217

    7. Frankfurt International 51,098,271

    8. Paris (Charles De Gaulle) 50,860,561

    9 Amsterdam (Schiphol) 42,541,180

    * Denver International 42,393,693
    * Las Vegas (McCarran) 43,436,571

    12. Phoenix (Sky Harbor) 39,493,519

    Airports Council International 2005 figures are not yet complete, but those available vary little in ranking.
    “We shape our Cities, thereafter they shape us.”

  26. #376
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    ^Dallas has nowhere to go but up. How many airports can boast the kind of capacity that DFW has?

  27. #377
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tnekster
    ^Dallas has nowhere to go but up. How many airports can boast the kind of capacity that DFW has?
    I fear though, that if we don't act soon we may miss our opportunity. Denver has come online as the world's largest airport and will meet any capacity needs any airlines have, possibly sending growth their way instead of this way. DFW doesn't have *that* many advantages over DIA. Sure, we're closer to some of the countries south of the US but Houston cover that well and has the brains to expand if it gets stressed by the additional traffic.

    I just see DFW missing the boat if nothing changes from this point. I think Fort Worth is happy with the current situation as long as they get AA's tax $, but I personally would like to see DFW grow into an airport with ATL like traffic and that isn't going to happen unless something changes. Perhaps it's in Fort Worth's best interest to have DFW be an underperforming airport as long as AA gets most of the business, but it sure seems short sighted for the region and nation.

    Jason

  28. #378
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    Quote Originally Posted by JasonDallas
    I fear though, that if we don't act soon we may miss our opportunity. Denver has come online as the world's largest airport and will meet any capacity needs any airlines have, possibly sending growth their way instead of this way. DFW doesn't have *that* many advantages over DIA. Sure, we're closer to some of the countries south of the US but Houston cover that well and has the brains to expand if it gets stressed by the additional traffic.


    Denver may have a larger airport but they don't reside on the river of trade like Dallas does. Dallas sits at the turning point from I-35 to I-20 where most of the trade bound for the eastern seaboard and eastern Canada travels. Denver does not enjoy this gift of location and never will. All of these trade deals that Dallas is signing with Long Beach and Mexico are only going to increase the regions stature as a logistics hub and increase the perceived value of DFW as an air cargo facility. The birth of the inland port in SE Dallas is being driven primarily by the river of trade that passes through SE Dallas. This primary trade corridor was not created by any government entity but rather the desire of trucking firms to get goods from Laredo to the Canadian border by the shortest and most direct route possible. That route is I-35, 1-20 to I-30 and up from there. I don't think you should fear. Our biggest ace is our location and that can not be beat or taken away from us. Even Houston recoginzed the importance of shipping goods up I-45 into SE Dallas to tap into the river of trade.

  29. #379
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tnekster
    Denver may have a larger airport but they don't reside on the river of trade like Dallas does. Dallas sits at the turning point from I-35 to I-20 where most of the trade bound for the eastern seaboard and eastern Canada travels. Denver does not enjoy this gift of location and never will. All of these trade deals that Dallas is signing with Long Beach and Mexico are only going to increase the regions stature as a logistics hub and increase the perceived value of DFW as an air cargo facility. The birth of the inland port in SE Dallas is being driven primarily by the river of trade that passes through SE Dallas. This primary trade corridor was not created by any government entity but rather the desire of trucking firms to get goods from Laredo to the Canadian border by the shortest and most direct route possible. That route is I-35, 1-20 to I-30 and up from there. I don't think you should fear. Our biggest ace is our location and that can not be beat or taken away from us. Even Houston recoginzed the importance of shipping goods up I-45 into SE Dallas to tap into the river of trade.
    Great post. We'll be a destination for business leaders from China and Mexico. If we can capitalize on CAFTA, we can be a trade center for all of Central America. The inalnd port and a large spanish speaking population give us a boost over Denver.

  30. #380
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    ^Thanks, I think this is the most exciting opportunity Dallas has going these days. It is so much bigger than anything else out there and will create one of the largest job centers in the metro area within a few short years.

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    Any advantage Denver has over DFW (if any) will go away in the coming years. Taxi times are the only thing I have heard are better there and DFW has already got the funds to construct perimeter taxiways in order to more efficently move aircraft around the runways and to the terminal gates. I firmly believe that DFW will see ATL like traffic once this market is opened up and the Wright Amendment is thrown out. Then passengers numbers will soar, new carriers will service both DFW & Love. existing carriers will expand their offering and air fares will fall. DFW is perfectly located, prepared for future growth and too good a facility not to be growing like other airports around the country. This is what fustrates me! DFW needs to be fighting Wright too but I guess they have an obligation to the airline that pays the bills there. No competition for AA is what is holding DFW back. The hub provides us with tons of daily frequencies to hundreds of destinations worldwide but it also prevents any other carriers from offering any substantial service from DFW because of AA's straglehold on the airport. Its a double edged sword. That stranglehold will be weakened when AA has to deal with WN at Love. We then will have more choices and low fares from both airports! I believe that growth is coming we just have to get rid of Wright! I cant wait!

    WRIGHT IS WRONG! SET LOVE FREE AND DFW WILL FINALLY PROSPER!

  32. #382
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    Survey says D/FW is the world's best cargo airport
    Dallas Business Journal - 5:51 PM CST Tuesday
    http://www.bizjournals.com/dallas/st...ml?t=printable
    Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport was named the best cargo airport in the world by global cargo industry magazine Air Cargo World, the airport said Tuesday.

    The airport was evaluated on performance, value, facilities and operations.

    "D/FW works extremely hard every day to bring new business opportunities to North Texas and to have our cargo customers call us the 'best in the world' is quite gratifying," said Joe Lopano, executive vice president of marketing and terminal management at D/FW.

    The survey was announced in Air Cargo World's March 6 edition.

    D/FW was ranked ahead of Memphis International and Fraport Frankfurt, which ranked No. 1 in Europe and Hong Kong International, the best in Asia.

    Survey participants evaluated each airport by rating four measures on a scale of one to five, as the highest. For each measure, the average rating across all companies in the survey was calculated and set to a value of 100.

    D/FW Airport scored a 113.

    The airport has seen impressive growth over the past year, with international cargo growing at 11 percent a year and Asian cargo growing at 6 percent a year. Air France's new service to D/FW marks a 20 percent increase in European cargo freighters each week, the airport said.

    Web site: www.dfwairport.com

  33. #383
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    Here is a link to the group conducting the survey with the actual results.

    http://www.aircargoworld.com/features/0306_2.htm

  34. #384
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    Trade & Transportation
    China Cargo Airlines adds D/FW flights
    Dallas Business Journal - March 10, 2006by Margaret AllenStaff Writer
    http://www.bizjournals.com/dallas/st...ml?t=printable

    China Cargo Airlines will add two flights a week in June to its service at Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport. That will bring the airline's service to six times a week.

    The airline entered the D/FW market in 2004 with freighter service three times a week. The fast pace of trade between North Texas and Asia, however, has rapidly boosted that to four times a week, according to the airport.

    The new service brings D/FW's Asian service to a total of 35 times a week, according to Joe Lopano, vice president of marketing at D/FW.

    "The trade between Asia and the United States is very, very strong," said Lopano, noting that as fast as the airport adds freight service to Asia, the more freight turns up to fill it.

    Geographically, Asian freighter cargo is the fastest-growing segment at the airport. It's been growing at a rate of almost 27% a year since 2001, according to the airport.

    Imports, not exports, are driving the huge Asian cargo volume increase of 2,000% at D/FW since 1993. In 2005, Asian freight made up nearly two-thirds -- 61% -- of D/FW's international air cargo.

    In comparison, the airport's total international air cargo has grown about 11% annually since 1996. About 26% of that total has been trade with Europe.

    China Cargo's route flies Shanghai to Seattle to D/FW to Chicago O'Hare to Seattle to Beijing to Shanghai aboard two MD-11s and two Boeing 747-200s.

    The steady growth in cargo is also driving development of air freight space at the airport.

    Trammell Crow Co. (NYSE: TCC) recently opened its newly built 35-acre masterplanned cargo center, comprised of 395,000 square feet of air cargo, logistics and freight forwarding office and warehouse space. The three buildings have direct access to the tarmac, eliminating trucks for transferring cargo.

    The facility is believed to be the first U.S. location able to accommodate both the massive Airbus A380 and the Boeing 747-400F freighters.

    The campus is the third for Trammell Crow, which in 1997 build the International Air CargoCentre I. In 2000 it opened International Air CargoCentre II.

    mallen@bizjournals.com | 214-706-7119

  35. #385
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    More cargo info. . .

    D/FW Airport adds cargo space, gains new carrier
    Sarah McClellan-Brandt - March 06, 2006
    Visit: http://www.fwbusinesspress.com/display.php?id=4568


    Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport announced at a March 1 board meeting that Air France Cargo USA has decided to join its growing list of cargo carriers.

    The airline will begin its North Texas operations April 1 with one weekly flight of cargo that will come from Paris, through D/FW, to Mexico City and back to Paris. This comes on the heels of the March 1 opening of the Trammell Crow Company International Air CargoCentre, which adds 365,000 square feet to the airport’s cargo capacity. The facility has the ability to accommodate Boeing 747-400 freighters and Airbus A380s, two of the largest aircraft available.

    Air France will operate out of the cargo facilities that existed before the new one was built. Several of the airport’s cargo carriers have moved or plan to move from the old space to the new in order to expand their operations.

    Airport officials estimate that the new flight will have an economic impact of $3.5 million.

    “This really is a reflection of the continuing growth we’re seeing in the cargo business,” said Joe Lopano, the airport’s executive vice president of marketing and terminal management. “It’s important for us to have cargo flights because they pay part of the bills out here. We’ve seen really strong growth to Europe and Asia, and it’s making Fort Worth into the air cargo center it really deserves to be based on this airport.”

    Seven percent of the airport’s total landing fee revenue in fiscal 2005, $12.5 million, came from cargo planes.

    Lopano said the airport is seeking growth in its cargo operations by meeting with as many companies as possible. He said luring Air France took more than a year.

    “We continually look at growing companies and try to target them to introduce new service to D/FW on a constant basis,” he said.

    The French planes will be carrying a mix of products ranging from apparel to electronics, Lopano said.

    He also said the main thing Air France officials said attracted them to D/FW was the size of the market and the business available within the market. He also said they were attracted to the airport’s efficiency.

    “Costs and efficiency are very good compared to some places they fly to,” he said. “Here there are no restrictions on when they fly, we have 24/7 operation, and costs are relatively low. Also, the availability of warehouse space and good highway systems so they can easily truck their cargo to the destinations once it gets here was a factor.”

    Jean-Yves Cap, director of Air France Cargo USA, did not return calls for comment but said in a D/FW press release, “this just makes sense for Air France.”

    “We did a survey of the cargo market and saw a need that we could fill,” he said. “Air France will shift one of our three weekly flights from Houston to DFW.”

    France currently accounts for 17,400 tons of cargo in and out of DFW each year. The new flight will raise that amount by as much as 7,800 tons.

    Lopano said that the possibility of Air France expanding its D/FW operations is “quite good.”

    “Customers, the shippers, like to have more than a one time a week opportunity to ship, so I would hope over time we can get them up in their flight frequency.”

    Airport officials are trying to bump the airport up from the seventh largest cargo carrier in the U.S. to the sixth in the next few years, and say it lags behind San Francisco by 53,000 tons of cargo annually. San Francisco sees 330,000 tons of cargo each year, while D/FW sees 277,000.

    A spokesperson said that D/FW is growing at 11 percent a year, and will shrink the gap accordingly. A combination of factors, including that the California city is expensive to fly into and to truck product out of and that D/FW is attracting more carriers with its new cargo facility could soon bump North Texas up a notch.

    More at link. . .

  36. #386
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    Fedex is building or has already built a facility at I-45 & I-20 to take advantage of all the trade that flows through there. Since the volume of trade that already does flow through that area being much greater than what flows through Alliance I wonder if they would consider moving ops to DFW to be closer to DIT.

  37. #387
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    Qantas has D/FW in its flight plans
    Australian airline wants to launch service - with the 'right' plane



    12:00 AM CST on Friday, March 31, 2006
    By ERIC TORBENSON and SUZANNE MARTA / The Dallas Morning News


    There's a fair dinkum chance you'll see Qantas Airways at Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport in short order.

    That's Aussie for "genuine or real."

    The flagship carrier of Australia would "fly the route tomorrow if we had the right plane," chief financial officer Peter Gregg said Thursday.

    Qantas just launched new service from Down Under to San Francisco, and now D/FW is its top target. "No doubt about that," Mr. Gregg said. "It's a tremendous market for us that we want to tap."

    Officials at D/FW have been trying to persuade Qantas to launch service for more than five years, said Joe Lopano, who heads the airport's marketing effort.

    "It means they're looking at us," Mr. Lopano said.

    About 40,000 passengers travel from Texas to Australia each year. If nonstop service were available, "we could double, if not triple that," Mr. Lopano said.

    Mr. Gregg said his carrier is leaning toward purchasing some Boeing 777-LR (for Long Range) jets that recently circled the world in a test flight.

    A rival Airbus is on the drawing board, but it won't be built for a while.

    It's unclear how quickly Boeing might be able to provide Qantas – one if its biggest customers – one of the new planes.

    The key to Qantas' interest is American Airlines Inc.'s huge hub at D/FW, with about 800 daily flights.

    "They're our oldest alliance partner, and we've got a tremendous relationship with them," Mr. Gregg said.

    D/FW officials made a sales call to the airline in February.

    And when Qantas' executive general manager, John Borghetti, was in town last November, Mr. Lopano's team picked him up from his downtown hotel and gave him a personal tour of D/FW's new international terminal.

    E-mail etorbenson@dallasnews.com

    and smarta@dallasnews.com



    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Online at: http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcont...2.78a45dd.html

    So, why would AA want to move flights from DFW, again???

  38. #388
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    I've been reading about this on Airliners.net and that thread pretty much says the same thing. Qantas would start service to DFW tomorrow if they had the right planes. So, it's really more a matter of "when" and not "if" anymore. In fact, most of the "experts" on A.net seem to think that DFW would overtake LAX as Qantas' North American hub if they could just get service started. It just makes sense.
    By the power of greyskull!

  39. #389
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    "The key to Qantas' interest is American Airlines Inc.'s huge hub at D/FW, with about 800 daily flights.

    "They're our oldest alliance partner, and we've got a tremendous relationship with them," Mr. Gregg said."




    Geaux, I totally agree..the above quote from the DMN article would definitely make D/FW Quantas' new North American hub IMO. And boy how great would it be to not have to make that connection at LAX anymore! :bounce:

  40. #390
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    Makes the $4Billion dollar investment seem a lot less scary. "They" cannot deliver those big planes to the carriers quick enough for me.

    Has AA bought any of those big-ass planes? Sure would be nice to see AA's international hub activity grow at DFW rather than Miami, Chicago etc. I still think Europe represents the greatest passenger service growth potential at DFW.

    What ever happened with Air India? They still debating between Texas destinations?

  41. #391
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    Quote Originally Posted by tamtagon
    Has AA bought any of those big-ass planes? Sure would be nice to see AA's international hub activity grow at DFW rather than Miami, Chicago etc. I still think Europe represents the greatest passenger service growth potential at DFW.
    I know they have some deliveries of 777's scheduled in 06 but I don't know which models they are. Everything I have heard about the potential at DFW has centered around the pacific rim, not Europe. When I had a conversation with a Dallas council member about it every airline he mentioned was pacific rim.

  42. #392
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    This is taken from USAviation commenting on AA ordering the new Boeing 787..


    "The good news is that there are rumors that Boeing may open a second production line for 787s and thereby double output if new order demand stays strong.

    A few quarters ago, Arpey and Beer commented that they were interested only in the 787-9 version, which at the time wasn't projected to be delivered until 2012 or so anyway. Since then, Boeing has revised the EIS of the 787-9 to 2010 or so, but has also introduced an even longer stretch (787-10) that is due to EIS in about 2012.

    I wouldn't worry - when AA finally orders 787s, I expect an order for about 100 of them to be delivered about one or 1.5 per month - and I assume that Boeing can arrange the delivery schedule to get AA its first one whenever Arpey says he wants it."
    __________________________________________________ __________

    for those unfamiliar..

    EIS = entry in service
    787-3 = 3500nm range (higher density) 290 seats
    787-8 = 8300-8500nm range 210-250 seats
    787-9 = 8600-8800nm range, 250-280 seats
    787-10 = range tbd, 300 seats


    Also, I expect AA to grow Internationally to Europe over time but it won't be this summer. They're planning for the smallest bump in additional Intl flying this summer than is usually normal. AA needs more wide body planes to expand internationally without grabbing planes already serving intl. city pairs. There really aren't too many places in Europe that are restrictive to fly (London Heathrow being the biggest exception coming to mind) however IMO, I think AA would love to expand moreso into Asia. I've heard that if AA is awarded another route into China (Shanghai finally begins out of ORD April 2nd) then it would like to fly that 2nd route out of DFW but it will need either more 777's or the new 787 mentioned above. I've also heard that the New Delhi flight out of ORD is performing beyond expectations and a 2nd destination for India could come about although with limited planes, this 2nd route could be flown as a through flight from Brussels or another European city.

    Northwest has some 787's planned for delivery in 2008 but with their BK problems of late, who knows if they'll pass on them allowing another airline to secure those rights (AA)??

  43. #393
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    Sure would be nice to see AA's international hub activity grow at DFW rather than Miami, Chicago etc
    Right on!

    You would think they would shift some of their international flights to the new terminal but they havent. I think its because more of AA's codeshare partners are in Chicago and Miami. I don't see why all of those carriers cannot start service here. Seems to me they would be better off connecting at DFW then they are only 4 hours or less away from every major city.


    AA's Codeshare Partners:

    Aer Lingus
    (oneworld carrier) Service between the United States and Ireland.

    Air Pacific
    Service between the United States and Nadi, Fiji. Want to find out which carrier is operating your flight? Check our Codeshare Partners Flight Number Range page.


    Alaska Airlines
    Service within the United States and select cities in Canada.

    British Airways
    (oneworld carrier) Worldwide Codeshare

    Cathay Pacific Airways
    (oneworld carrier) Service between the United States and Hong Kong, Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, and Thailand.

    China Eastern Airlines
    Service between the United States and Shanghai and Beijing, People's Republic of China.

    EVA Air
    Service between the United States and Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China.

    Finnair
    (oneworld carrier) Service between the United States and Finland, Latvia and Sweden.

    Gulf Air
    Service between the United States and Abu Dhabi, U.A.E.; Bahrain; and Muscat, Oman.

    Hawaiian Airlines
    Service within and between the Hawaiian cities of Honolulu, Hilo, Kona, Lihue, Lanai and Kahului.

    Iberia
    (oneworld carrier) Service between the United States and Spain.

    Japan Airlines
    Service between the United States and Japan, Malaysia, Singapore, South Korea, Thailand and Vietnam.

    LAN Airlines
    (oneworld carrier) Service between the United States and Chile and Easter Island.

    Mexicana
    Service between the United States and Mexico.

    Qantas Airways
    (oneworld carrier) Service between the United States and Australia and New Zealand.

    SN Brussels Airlines
    Service throughout Europe and selected destinations in Africa.

    SWISS
    Service between the United States and Switzerland, and beyond Switzerland to select destinations in Europe, Africa, the Middle East and Asia.

    TAM Airlines
    Service between the United States and Brazil.

    Turkish Airlines
    Service between the United States and Istanbul, Turkey.

  44. #394
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tnekster
    I know they have some deliveries of 777's scheduled in 06 but I don't know which models they are. Everything I have heard about the potential at DFW has centered around the pacific rim, not Europe. When I had a conversation with a Dallas council member about it every airline he mentioned was pacific rim.
    American will be receiving two 777-200ERs this year. The same model as the other 40-some 777s they already have.

    Here's a photo of the newest addition to the fleet.

    AA did recently (November IIRC) relaunch DFW-Osaka.


    You would think they would shift some of their international flights to the new terminal but they havent. I think its because more of AA's codeshare partners are in Chicago and Miami. I don't see why all of those carriers cannot start service here. Seems to me they would be better off connecting at DFW then they are only 4 hours or less away from every major city.
    Keep in mind that a lot of the new services are started at Chicago, Miami, etc., due to geographic convenience. For example, the new India flight from Chicago means that there is less backtracking for connecting customers since the flight is shorter than continuing on to Dallas. Anyone who needs to get to Dallas or other points beyond can still do so easily with a connection in Chicago.

    Cities on the periphery of the country tend to get more service because of this. Where DFW is suited for such things is Australia/NZ (after LAX) and to a lesser extent (due to AA's Miami hub), South America. Analysts have suggested that DFW is primed to be a major connecting point for Asia-South America flights in the near future since it falls right on the natural flight path. I'll believe it when I see it.

  45. #395
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    AA tentatively received the first 777 on Monday the 27th..the second is due for delivery in May.

  46. #396
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    Keep in mind that a lot of the new services are started at Chicago, Miami, etc., due to geographic convenience. For example, the new India flight from Chicago means that there is less backtracking for connecting customers since the flight is shorter than continuing on to Dallas. Anyone who needs to get to Dallas or other points beyond can still do so easily with a connection in Chicago.
    Won't this be less of a factor when the next generation of aircraft are in service?

  47. #397
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    Quote Originally Posted by FortWorthGuy
    Won't this be less of a factor when the next generation of aircraft are in service?
    Sure, to an extent, as planes like the 787 will open up some new long-haul markets that can't sustain the passenger loads needed for 747s and the new Airbus. I read that someone suggested the 787 will do to the Pacific what the 767 did to the Atlantic (opening up a lot of US-Europe city pairs previously uneconomical).

  48. #398
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    Quote Originally Posted by interestedobserver
    Sure, to an extent, as planes like the 787 will open up some new long-haul markets that can't sustain the passenger loads needed for 747s and the new Airbus. I read that someone suggested the 787 will do to the Pacific what the 767 did to the Atlantic (opening up a lot of US-Europe city pairs previously uneconomical).
    Northwest, the dominant US pacific carrier, has ordered a whole bunch of the 787s. Supposedly they got a great deal because Boeing was trying to build orders early. Expect to see a lot more US pacfic flights in the future. Northwest has a pretty good chance of being bought out by a larger carrier because of its pacific routes and Tokyo hub. Maybe American will buy it??? Their domestic route structures don't match up very well, though. Delta and Northwest are probably the best fit, but both are flat broke. Delta may not make it.

  49. #399
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    ATA Airlines Adds 4th Daily Flight Between Dallas/Ft. Worth and Chicago-Midway

    INDIANAPOLIS, April 3, 2006 (PRIMEZONE) -- ATA Airlines has added a fourth daily (except Saturday) flight between Dallas/Ft. Worth (DFW) and Chicago-Midway (MDW). All flights will use Boeing 737 jets.

    "The success of our codeshare and frequent flyer relationship with Southwest Airlines prompted this fourth daily trip. Customers between DFW and some 19 cities are benefiting from convenient, low-fare ATA and Southwest connections at MDW," said Senior Vice President, Scheduled Service, Josef Loew. "Customers can purchase a single ticket between DFW and the codeshare destination -- including MDW -- and also have the choice of earning ATA Travel Awards or Southwest Rapid Rewards frequent flyer credits for their trip."

    In addition to Dallas/Ft. Worth -- Chicago-Midway, the following are examples of the cities customers are able to connect to, via MDW:



    Baltimore+ Long Island/Islip+ Philadelphia+
    Columbus+ Louisville+ Pittsburgh+
    Cleveland+ Manchester+ Raleigh/Durham+
    Detroit+ New York LGA Washington, DC - DCA
    Indianapolis+


    Looks like the codeshare for WN and ATA is doing well @ DFW.

  50. #400
    In the O.R. Geaux Tigers's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Shreveport Rock City
    Posts
    1,711
    ^Well, duh! You can fly from DFW to Midway and practically connect to anywhere Southwest flies.
    By the power of greyskull!

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