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Thread: DFW wants to be the premier airport in the global marketplace

  1. #651
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    Quote Originally Posted by tamtagon
    Is there any indication that Delta will eventually rebuild a hub at DFW?
    Not only will Delta not build a hub, but no carrier will attempt to build any meaningful presence until the flock of silver birds is cut in half.

  2. #652
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    Quote Originally Posted by DallasNative
    Not only will Delta not build a hub, but no carrier will attempt to build any meaningful presence until the flock of silver birds is cut in half.
    And ya' know why? Because the Metroplex couldn't support it. AA's hub at DFW is so huge because of connecting traffic. Not because of local demand.

    Delta had far more to do with the undoing of its DFW hub than AA. The airline realized that it could just as easily funnel people through its ATL megahub as DFW, build efficiencies, and save tons of cash, to boot.

    That's also why you saw AA retreat from STL post-9/11. It made very little sense to have THREE mid-continent hubs.

    The demand for local services at DFW is met, FAR above and beyond what it calls for. And I'm grateful for that.

  3. #653
    The Urban Pragmatist Mballar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by interestedobserver
    The demand for local services at DFW is met, FAR above and beyond what it calls for. And I'm grateful for that.
    1. Which group of travelers account for majority of our local passenger traffic? . . Business or Liesurel?

    2. Are there any studies showing whether lower fares encourage more traffic?

    3. Where does a majority of DFW passenger traffic come from? . . East or West of the airport?
    Last edited by Mballar; 14 May 2007 at 11:19 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mballar

    3. Where does a majority of DFW passenger traffic come from? . . East or West of the airport?
    According to AA, it's "best" customers live in Dallas.

  5. #655
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    DFW Featured in Newly Published Book, “The World Connected: DFW International Airport, Taking Flight into the 21st Century”
    Photo-filled volume profiles massive expansion at DFW and history of North Texas aviation; Available in Airport bookstores and via online purchase


    (DFW INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT – May 11, 2007) – DFW International Airport and its massive effort to build the new International Terminal D and Skylink train under challenging economic and security conditions is highlighted in a new book entitled “The World Connected: DFW International Airport, Taking Flight Into the 21st Century.”

    Written by local author Ginger Ebinger, the 272-page volume chronicles the planning, design and construction of DFW’s $2.8-billion Capital Development Program (CDP), the largest expansion in the Airport’s history which opened just four years after the 9/11 terrorist attacks and the resulting economic difficulties on the global aviation industry.

    “The World Connected” also features an in-depth look at the rich history of aviation in North Texas stretching back to the early 1900s with stories and photographs of the area’s aviation pioneers, through the vision and creation of DFW International Airport.

    The book culminates with the most recent major milestones in DFW’s history: the resolution of the Wright Amendment debate and the partnership with Chesapeake Energy to drill for natural gas on the Airport’s 18,000 acres.

    “There have been books written about DFW in the past, but never anything approaching the beauty and depth of this book,” said Jeff Fegan, CEO of DFW. “There are so many interesting stories which are part of the legendary history of aviation in Dallas and Fort Worth, and of course DFW is re-writing history every day with our new facilities and our growth plans for the decades ahead.”

    The book details many of the goals, design concepts and challenges facing the Airport’s developers and visionaries, from the beginning of construction in 1968 to other key points in history.

    “DFW executives faced a very difficult and unique set of circumstances in the days following the 9/11 attacks,” said author Ginger Ebinger. “The fact that they were able to complete the new international terminal and Skylink on time and under budget says a lot about the world-class team that DFW employs.”

    “The World Connected” takes readers on an illustrated tour of the massive CDP construction project that produced International Terminal D and the DFW Grand Hyatt Hotel, Skylink and other major Airport improvements completed in 2005.

    Additionally, the new book contains an entire section detailing each of the 37 works of art that comprise DFW’s bold and compelling $6-million Art Program, which includes works inside International Terminal D and all ten Skylink stations as well as the Nasher Sculpture Garden.

    More than 18 months in the making, “The World Connected” was researched and developed with the assistance of the DFW Airport Public Affairs Department as well as the Communications team from the DFW Capital Development Program.

    “Our team put a great deal of hard work and research into this book, and I truly think it brings the incredible history of DFW up to date,” said Ken Capps, vice president of public affairs at DFW. “We are pleased it even has a happy ending with the Wright Amendment compromise and the Chesapeake deal.”

    The book also contains hundreds of photographs collected from DFW’s Records Management Department, the Dallas Public Library’s Dallas History and Archives Division, the University of Texas at Arlington’s Special Collections Division and other archival sources.

    “Anyone interested in aviation will find this book fascinating,” said Duff Tussing of DSA Publishing of McKinney, Texas, the book’s publisher. “It really captures the romance and spirit of flying that has long captivated the American public, and the colorful local history presented here makes it a very entertaining read.”

    The book retails for $39.95 and will be available via secure online purchase at www.celebratedfw.com, as well as at the four Hudson Booksellers stores at DFW, located in the terminals at A16, B20, C24 and E13. The publisher independently financed the book through sponsor advertising and sales, and the Airport receives no money or royalties from sales of the book.
    Last edited by dfwcre8tive; 15 May 2007 at 04:04 PM.

  6. #656
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    Quote Originally Posted by njjeppson
    DFW Featured in Newly Published Book, “The World Connected: DFW International Airport, Taking Flight into the 21st Century”
    Photo-filled volume profiles massive expansion at DFW and history of North Texas aviation; Available in Airport bookstores and via online purchase


    The publisher independently financed the book through sponsor advertising and sales, and the Airport receives no money or royalties from sales of the book.
    Who would do such a thing (buy expensive advertising in or make bulk purchases of, this book)?

  7. #657
    Incoherent Rambler grantboston's Avatar
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    ^I've been thinking about it. I'm doing my thesis on development of aviation markets between the US and Latin America. And while DFW doesn't really apply to my purposes, it might to some others.

    Of course, that's a little outside the norm.

  8. #658
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    Quote Originally Posted by St-T
    Ryanair CEO talks of new trans-Atlantic carrier with $12 fares to Europe
    Is the idea of a $12 flight to Europe too good to be true? Maybe not, if Ryanair CEO Michael O'Leary gets his way.

    Bloomberg News reports that the Ryanair chief "plans to start a no-frills trans-Atlantic airline, offering fares as low as $12, following the 'open skies' accord between the U.S. and European Union. The new airline would fly from Ryanair's existing bases including London Stansted, Dublin and Frankfurt-Hahn, O'Leary said today in a briefing to reporters. The carrier would go to secondary U.S. airports at destinations including New York, San Francisco, San Diego, Boston, Dallas and Florida," Bloomberg adds. In Europe, Ryanair is known for its rock-bottom fares -- and for its absence of even the most basic amenities.
    Alliance? It has US Customs already.

  9. #659
    Incoherent Rambler grantboston's Avatar
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    ^Does it have immigration control? I'm not entirely sure how the cargo and passenger processes differ, but I imagine if the government is willing to staff it, these airports could probably find the room.

  10. #660
    High-Rise Member F4shionablecHa0s's Avatar
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    Southwest allowed the founders of Ryanair access to their entire operation to study the way they do things. I could see Southwest using their influence to allow the international version of Ryanair to operate into Love Field.

  11. #661
    High-Rise Member TexasPlus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by F4shionablecHa0s
    Southwest allowed the founders of Ryanair access to their entire operation to study the way they do things. I could see Southwest using their influence to allow the international version of Ryanair to operate into Love Field.
    Or simply buying Ryanair. A tremendous amount of similarities exist between the two. A few examples: Fleet similarities, Tops in customer satisfaction, they even have "Ryanair Bing" for the desktop...

    One minor point, Ryanair is an International airline.

    History of Ryanair

    Ryanair was Europe's original low fares airline and is still Europe's largest low fares carrier. In the current year Ryanair will carry over 42m passengers on 473 low fare routes across 25 European countries. We have 19 European bases and by the end of March 2007 Ryanair will operate a fleet of 134 new Boeing 737-800 aircraft with firm orders for a further 117 new aircraft (net of planned disposals), which will be delivered over the next 5 years. These additional aircraft will allow Ryanair to double in size to over 84m passengers p.a. by 2012. Ryanair currently employs a team of 4,200 people, comprising over 25 different nationalities.

    Here is a brief history of Europe's first and largest low fares airline:
    http://www.ryanair.com/site/EN/about.php?page=About
    "Liberalism: Moochers Electing Looters to Steal from Producers."

  12. #662
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    http://www.airports.org/cda/aci/disp...%5E12875_9_2__

    BY REGION

    Best Airport Worldwide
    1) Incheon, South Korea
    2) Hong Kong
    3) Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
    4) Singapore
    5) Dallas Fort Worth, USA

    Best Airprt Europe
    1) Zurich, Switzerland
    2) Brussels, Belgium
    3) Helsinki, Finland
    3) Porto, Portugal
    5) Munich, Germany

    Best Airport Americas
    1) Dallas, Fort Worth USA
    2) Halifax, Canada
    3) Ottawa, Canada
    3) Detroit Metropolitan, USA
    5) San Diego, USA

    Best Airport Middle East-Africa
    1) Abu Dhabi, UAE
    2) Cape Town, South Africa
    3) Doha, Qatar
    4) Johannesburg, South Africa
    5) Durban, South Africa

    Best Airport Asia-Pacific
    1) Incheon, South Korea
    2) Hong Kong
    3) Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
    4) Singapore
    5) Central Japan (NGO)


    BY SIZE OF AIRPORT

    Best Airport fewer than 5 Million Passangers
    1) Halifax, Canada
    2) Ottawa, Canada
    3) Porto, Portugal
    4) Malta
    5) Sandefjord, Norway

    Best Airport 5-15 Million Passangers
    1) Central Japan (NGO)
    2) Adelaide, Australia
    3) Helsinki, Finland
    3) Christchurch, New Zealand
    5) Abu Dhabi, UAE

    Best Airport 15-25 Million Pasangers
    1) Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
    2) San Diego, USA
    3) Zurich, Switzerland
    4) Brussels, Belgium
    5) Vancouver, Canada

    Best Airport 25-40 Million Passangers
    1) Incheon, South Korea
    2) Singapore
    3) Detroit Metropolitan, USA
    4) Toronto, Canada
    5) Munich, Germany

    Best Airport over 40 Million passangers
    1) Hong Kong
    2) Dallas Fort Worth, USA
    3) Denver, USA
    4) Amsterdam, Netherlands
    5) Beijing, China

    OTHER AWARDS

    Best Domestic Airport
    1) Austin, USA
    2) Halifax, Canada
    3) Ottawa, Canada
    4) Dallas Fort Worth, USA
    5) San Diego, USA

    Airport People Award
    Middle East.Africa - Abu Dhabi, UAE
    Europe - Brussels, Belgium
    Asia-Pacific - Incheon, South Korea
    Americas - Halifax, Canada

    DG's Special Recognition Award
    Dubai, UAE

  13. #663
    Administrator dfwcre8tive's Avatar
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    D/FW gets top marks in airport survey
    10:38 AM CDT on Tuesday, May 22, 2007
    By TERRY MAXON / The Dallas Morning News
    tmaxon@dallasnews.com
    http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcont....93efba64.html

    Air travelers rated Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport highest in overall airport satisfaction among the nation’s largest airports, and Dallas Love Field finished second in the small airport category, according to a J.D. Power and Associates report.

    On a scale of 0 to 1,000, travelers actually gave Love Field a higher score than D/FW Airport, but Love Field finished second to Houston Hobby Airport in the small-airport category.

    The survey respondents handed D/FW Airport a 704 score, followed closely at 701 by the Detroit and Atlanta airports.

    Love Field, which was top rated in last year’s survey, tied with San Antonio with 713 and behind Hobby at 715.

    The top-rated airport overall was Kansas City, leader in the medium-sized airports with 721.

    The bottom-ranked airports were San Francisco in the largest category, Calgary, Canada, in the medium category and Austin Bergstrom International Airport at the bottom of the smallest airports.

  14. #664
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    Quote Originally Posted by njjeppson
    D/FW gets top marks in airport survey
    10:38 AM CDT on Tuesday, May 22, 2007
    By TERRY MAXON / The Dallas Morning News
    tmaxon@dallasnews.com
    http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcont....93efba64.html

    On a scale of 0 to 1,000, travelers actually gave Love Field a higher score than D/FW Airport, but Love Field finished second to Houston Hobby Airport in the small-airport category.
    So why is it that the DFW Airport, American Airlines and the City of Fort Worth are forcing us to rebuild the facility at a cost of several hundred million dollars (all of which will ultimately be borne by Southwest Airlines and Love Field passengers)?

  15. #665
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    From the AA employee website. I saw this posted elsewhere and am not an AA employee.

    "---AA TO WITHDRAW DFW-ZRH, ORD-SNN ROUTES IN FALL---
    American plans to discontinue flying its routes between DFW and
    Zurich, Switzerland
    , and between Chicago O'Hare and Shannon, Ireland,
    this fall. The DFW-ZRH route will stop flying Oct. 28, and the
    Shannon route will end Oct. 1, 2007. The decision continues
    American's long-term focus on managing the business to achieve
    sustained profitability. Both routes have been unprofitable for some
    time, further weakened by high jet fuel costs, as well as the loss of
    codeshare traffic out of Zurich. In the case of Shannon, American has
    been required to fly there by the Irish government as a condition of
    also serving Dublin."

    That's too bad, but should free up a plane for AA. Guess we'll wait and see where it goes.

  16. #666
    High-Rise Member TexasPlus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by grantboston
    The decision continues
    American's long-term focus on managing the business to achieve
    sustained profitability. Both routes have been unprofitable for some
    time, further weakened by high jet fuel costs, as well as the loss of
    codeshare traffic out of Zurich. In the case of Shannon, American has
    been required to fly there by the Irish government as a condition of
    also serving Dublin."

    That's too bad, but should free up a plane for AA. Guess we'll wait and see where it goes.
    More likely they will just retire a few more old clunkers.
    "Liberalism: Moochers Electing Looters to Steal from Producers."

  17. #667
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    Quote Originally Posted by TexasPlus
    More likely they will just retire a few more old clunkers.
    No, probably not the 767-300s. I have read that AA needs the plane(s) used on this route for Chicago-Buenos Aires which will be starting up in October.

    Also, there is speculation that once European Open Skies takes effect in the spring, AA will move all DFW-London flights to Heathrow and perhaps throw in an extra morning frequency. But at least as of now, Heathrow is an entirely 777 airport for AA, and I doubt they'd want just one or two flights on 767s into there. So where those 777s will come is unknown to me (if adding an extra daily to London is even in the cards).

  18. #668
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    DFW NAMED A BEST AIRPORT FOR A LAYOVER BY FORBES TRAVELER
    Publication Selects DFW as the Only Airport in the Americas to win the Award


    Forbes Traveler, a premier travel publication, recently named DFW International Airport one of the world’s Best Airports for a Layover. Among the eight international airports listed in the article published this month, DFW was the only airport in the Americas to receive the designation.

    Forbes Traveler notes that airports with amenities to increase the comfort and convenience of travelers increasingly are gaining an advantage over those without the same options. In particular, the publication mentions that travelers prefer airports with shopping, hotels, play areas for children and leisure activities such as art exhibits and fitness clubs, all of which can be found at DFW.

    The article calls DFW’s International Terminal D “state-of-the-art” and praises the airport’s “posh” 298-room Grand Hyatt Hotel. In addition to everything else it has to offer, DFW makes connecting between any of its five terminals a breeze with a quick ride on the airport’s high-speed train, Skylink.

    DFW has been recognized as a leader in the airport industry, both for its exceptional customer service as well as for its outstanding facilities. DFW understands that its passengers have a choice when making travel arrangements and goes the extra mile to provide travelers with a great experience.

  19. #669
    High-Rise Member TexasPlus's Avatar
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    Love Needed @ DFW

    The USO is a great organization and provides a wonderful benefit for our service members. Below is an article written by Steve Blow for the Dallas Morning News.

    As you evaluate organizations worthy of your contributions, I would ask that you consider the USO. It gets no government money and is entirely funded by contributions.

    Thanks -

    USO DFW
    P O Box 613306
    D/FW Airport, Texas 75261

    Troops need love, starting at USO

    07:47 AM CDT on Sunday, May 27, 2007

    I know this is the weekend we're supposed to honor those who died in military service.

    But today let's send flowers to the living.

    Or, more precisely, spicy chicken sandwiches.

    It has been a long time since I tapped your generosity, but I heard about a situation that I knew you would want to remedy.

    You see, the food budget at the Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport USO is running in the red. And word went out to volunteers last week that they will have to cut back on some of the goodies offered to soldiers passing through the airport.

    I say: No way.

    And I'm betting that many of you will join me in bolstering the budget at our USO. Those volunteers sure hope so.

    I was out at the airport one afternoon last week as yet another planeload of desert-camo-clad soldiers prepared to head back to Iraq and Afghanistan after two weeks of R&R. My impulse was to throw my arms around every one of them in admiration and appreciation.

    But I know they would rather have an ice cream bar.

    A little ways down from their departure gate in Terminal B, volunteer Wayne Wolk of Bedford worked behind the counter of the USO's snack bar. He showed me how he has taped sheets of paper over some of the ice cream treats featured on the freezer box.

    "Those are really popular, but they're more expensive, so we don't have them anymore," he said. "I cover up the pictures because we don't want to tease anyone with things we don't have."

    Now that's just sad. If anyone deserves a premium ice cream bar right now, it's the men and women serving in our military. Whatever your feelings about the war, surely we can unite around ice cream.

    Most people are probably aware by now that D/FW Airport is one of the major hubs for soldiers traveling to and from Iraq and other bases in the Middle East. Every day a planeload of soldiers arrives from the region and another heads out. Because of that, a USO was opened at D/FW three years ago. It has proved popular, to say the least.

    Army Spc. Jeffrey Martin of Killeen was lounging in the USO lobby area as he waited for the departure hour to arrive. "The first time I came in here, I'm like, 'Wow. Do I have to leave?' " he said.

    The 30-year-old medic will be back in Taji by the time you read this – in the midst of his second tour in Iraq. So he has seen a few USOs and gives the D/FW facility high marks. "It's awesome," he said. "One of the very best."

    The setting is certainly ideal. It used to be Continental Airlines' VIP lounge. These days it caters to VIPs in combat boots.

    One of the most popular areas is the media room, where soldiers watched Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby on a giant plasma TV. Nearby were a computer room, sleeping room, family room with books and toys and – upstairs – foosball tables and video games. And everything is free.

    "Based on 21 years in the military, this is the nicest USO I have ever seen. It's the new standard," said Army Maj. Patrick McAfee, who oversees the troop movements through D/FW Airport.

    D/FW USO director Rhenda White-Brunner has been in the job almost two years. And it's a labor of love. "This is what I would have done in retirement," said Rhenda, an "Air Force brat." "I just got to do it sooner."

    But the job has its pressures – mainly budgetary. Stateside USO operations are expected to be as self-supporting as possible.

    So when the food budget went $16,000 into the red for the first quarter, that meant cutbacks on the premium chicken sandwiches and other more expensive deli selections. "We didn't want to take out some items, but I'm being held accountable," Rhenda said.

    Well, what a great holiday weekend for us to remember those lives lost in military service and honor the living sacrifice so many are making right now.

    Flowers on a grave are nice, but a spicy chicken sandwich is really special.

    http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcont....4334198.html#
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  20. #670
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    Quote Originally Posted by TexasPlus
    The USO is a great organization and provides a wonderful benefit for our service members. Below is an article written by Steve Blow for the Dallas Morning News.

    As you evaluate organizations worthy of your contributions, I would ask that you consider the USO. It gets no government money and is entirely funded by contributions.

    Thanks -

    USO DFW
    P O Box 613306
    D/FW Airport, Texas 75261
    As I read this article, it struck me that this would be a great cause for the DFW Airport Board to support, especially given the fact that they just scored a major windfall on the natural gas deal.

    I know they've earmarked most of the money to be given to the airlines (i.e. AA) via a reduction in landing fess... but it would be nice if they could leave just [i]a little[/] for causes like these.

    Besides, it would be a good piece of P.R. for the airport... probably much more effective than the full page ad it pays for in American Airlines' inflight magazine each month.

  21. #671
    Administrator dfwcre8tive's Avatar
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    D/FW to use gas well money to spruce up terminals
    11:13 PM CDT on Tuesday, June 5, 2007
    By TERRY MAXON / The Dallas Morning News
    tmaxon@dallasnews.com
    http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcont...w.36d2a5e.html

    Parts of Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport are beginning to look a little run down, so airport officials plan to apply a $45 million freshening to the airport's older terminals.

    A committee of the D/FW board on Tuesday approved plans to refurbish bathrooms, replace carpet and signs, and otherwise fix up the place over the next year. The full board is to vote on the plans Thursday.

    Airport managers told board members that passengers have noticed that D/FW, more than 30 years old, needs some improvements. The new Terminal D, with its new furnishings and modern design, underscores how much Terminals A, B, C and E need to be brought up to date, the managers said.

    Joe Lopano, D/FW Airport's executive vice president of marketing and terminal management, said D/FW has to compete with other airlines for passengers who have a choice of airports.

    "This will bring our terminals up, way up," Mr. Lopano said.

    The funds would come from a $185 million payment from Chesapeake Energy Corp., which won the rights to drill natural gas wells on airport property.

    "It's a pretty good investment," Mr. Lopano said.

    Among the major improvements are an improved heating and cooling system and new jet bridges for Terminal E; air-conditioning units to cool parked airplanes; auto-docking equipment for aircraft coming into gates; and new seating, signs and lighting.

    Jim Crites, the airport's executive vice president of operations, said the work would probably start in several months, with all projects completed in about a year. Restroom refurbishment will probably take the longest, he said.

    Board members balked at a proposal to spend $5 million to promote D/FW Airport primarily in Latin America and Asia.

    Visit D/FW, a new group formed by the convention and visitors bureaus of Dallas and Fort Worth, would have received the contract.

    Member Jeff Wentworth of Fort Worth said he thought the North Texas Commission's job was to promote the airport, and he worried that the airport would face an ever-growing demand for money to support Visit D/FW.

    The item was deferred to Thursday's board meeting. D/FW chief executive Jeff Fegan said the mayors of Fort Worth and Dallas had brought the proposal to the airport.

  22. #672
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    Quote Originally Posted by njjeppson
    D/FW to use gas well money to spruce up terminals
    11:13 PM CDT on Tuesday, June 5, 2007
    By TERRY MAXON / The Dallas Morning News
    tmaxon@dallasnews.com
    http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcont...w.36d2a5e.html

    Parts of Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport are beginning to look a little run down, so airport officials plan to apply a $45 million freshening to the airport's older terminals...
    When I first read this article, I got kind of excited.... thinking, you know, that the airport was going to spend $45 million freshening up the older terminals... you know, the ones with the ramshackle, depressing baggage claim areas, parking garages which don't meet current ADA standards, claustrophobic check-in counters, etc.

    Instead, a close read of the article indicates that the lion's share of the money is going for airplane servicing equipment, including stuff like "air conditioning units to cool parked airplanes" that airlines typically pay for themselves.

    Cutting through it all, it looks like the only things the terminals are getting are refurbished bathrooms, new signs, lighting & seating... none of which are big ticket items.

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    Quote Originally Posted by PuddinHead
    Improvements in airplane handling facilities are a great way to improve the terminals to attract airlines to the airport. Think about it this way as long as the airplanes APU is not being used to cool a parked airplane that lowers the cost of the operations for the airlines and contributes to cleaner air for the region.

    Besides you can buy lots of carpets and paint and restroom equipment for a few million dollars.
    It doesn't matter how much marble is on the inside, its all the silver on the apron that is preventing other airlines from coming to DFW.

  24. #674
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    Quote Originally Posted by UptownDallas
    When I first read this article, I got kind of excited.... thinking, you know, that the airport was going to spend $45 million freshening up the older terminals... you know, the ones with the ramshackle, depressing baggage claim areas, parking garages which don't meet current ADA standards, claustrophobic check-in counters, etc.

    Instead, a close read of the article indicates that the lion's share of the money is going for airplane servicing equipment, including stuff like "air conditioning units to cool parked airplanes" that airlines typically pay for themselves.

    Cutting through it all, it looks like the only things the terminals are getting are refurbished bathrooms, new signs, lighting & seating... none of which are big ticket items.
    Color me surprised, Uptown is not happy with DFW improving their older terminals, even E (gasp, no AA there). You must have a mighty large ax.

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    Quote Originally Posted by interestedobserver
    Color me surprised, Uptown is not happy with DFW improving their older terminals, even E (gasp, no AA there). You must have a mighty large ax.
    No, quite the contrary... just wish they were doing more. The Airport Board received a $100+ million windfall, and have dedicated a disappointingly small amount to terminal improvements (a small fraction of the $45 million).

    Instead, the lion's share appears to be passed through to the existing airlines using the airport via either landing fee reductions or purchase of ground equipment typically funded by user airlines themselves.

    With respect to the air pollution concerns noted by Puddinhead both American Airlines and Southwest are already operating under consent decrees with the Texas Department of Environmental Quality to reduce pollution through measures such as the one outlined.

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    Quote Originally Posted by UptownDallas
    With respect to the air pollution concerns noted by Puddinhead both American Airlines and Southwest are already operating under consent decrees with the Texas Department of Environmental Quality to reduce pollution through measures such as the one outlined.[/indent]
    I don't know about AAmerican... However SWA started installing ground electrical and ground air conditioning services at all gates in all it's cities a couple of years ago. I think the project is complete, if not it is very close. SWA payed for it, and is getting a large return on it's investment via APU fuel savings and reducing wear on the APU.
    "Liberalism: Moochers Electing Looters to Steal from Producers."

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    Quote Originally Posted by TexasPlus
    I don't know about AAmerican... However SWA started installing ground electrical and ground air conditioning services at all gates in all it's cities a couple of years ago. I think the project is complete, if not it is very close. SWA payed for it, and is getting a large return on it's investment via APU fuel savings and reducing wear on the APU.
    Interesting... so why is the Airport Board paying for American's ground systems at DFW?

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    Quote Originally Posted by UptownDallas
    Interesting... so why is the Airport Board paying for American's ground systems at DFW?
    If you owned the DFW Airport Board, wouldn't you cut deals like that? :fish:
    "Liberalism: Moochers Electing Looters to Steal from Producers."

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    Quote Originally Posted by PuddinHead
    Yeah, its ashame Southwest was so selfish wouldn't it be great if we could have gotten canyon blue out there.
    I'm curious why you hold out only Southwest and call it being selfish. So was Delta selfish when it closed its hub at DFW? I don't think you can find a single reasonable person to argue that the closure of Delta's hub wasn't a prudent business decision. Was Airtran selfish when it stopped its promised DFW expansion and cut half of its markets and flights from DFW? Are all the other airlines selfish because they only serve their hub airports from DFW? Is JetBlue selfish because it has chosen to serve many other markets but not DFW?

    I'll tell you what all of these selfish decisions by all these airlines have in common: The surpressing monopolization of DFW by AA. Again, no airline is going to add any meaningful flight activity at DFW until there is a significant draw down of activity by AA.

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    Frontier launches new service from D/FW
    Dallas Business Journal - 11:09 AM CDT Thursday, June 7, 2007
    http://www.bizjournals.com/dallas/st...ml?jst=b_ln_hl

    Frontier Airlines on Thursday launched new service from Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport to Mazatlan, Mexico.

    The Denver-based airline has launched three weekly flights from D/FW to Mazatlan.

    Mazatlan has been one of Frontier's most popular Mexican destinations, since Frontier started flying to the city from its Denver hub in 2002, said Frontier (NASDAQ: FRNT) spokesman John Happ in a prepared statement Thursday.

    Web site: www.frontierairlines.com

  31. #681
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    D/FW Airport launching marketing initiative
    Dallas Business Journal - 5:06 PM CDT Thursday, June 7, 2007
    http://www.bizjournals.com/dallas/st...l?surround=lfn

    Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport said Thursday it will spend up to $5 million during the first 18 months of a marketing initiative designed to drive traffic to and through the airport.

    The airport's board approved the new marketing initiative Thursday.

    The campaign is focused on several key international markets and will be spearheaded by the "Visit DFW" organization, which is a joint venture of the Dallas and Fort Worth convention and visitors bureaus.

    The CVBs have considerable expertise in bringing visitors and business to our region, and D/FW is leveraging that expertise to increase its passenger volumes," said Joe Lopano, D/FW Airport's executive vice president for marketing and terminal management.

    D/FW Airport said the marketing initiative will include consumer and trade advertising and promotion, and will focus on Mexico, South America and Asia. Mexico represents the airport's largest international market, and is seen as a region where D/FW can increase its market share.

    The campaign may also include partnerships with airlines that serve the airport and promotions with the airport's target tour operators and travel agencies.

    Web site: www.dfwairport.com

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    Quote Originally Posted by UptownDallas
    No, quite the contrary... just wish they were doing more. The Airport Board received a $100+ million windfall, and have dedicated a disappointingly small amount to terminal improvements (a small fraction of the $45 million).

    Instead, the lion's share appears to be passed through to the existing airlines using the airport via either landing fee reductions or purchase of ground equipment typically funded by user airlines themselves.
    This reminds me of the story of Goldilocks and the Three Bears. Terminal D was too expensive, old terminal enhancements aren't enough... I wonder what would be just right?

    Here's my take: DFW realizes that the old terminals have lived most of their useful life, and the airport isn't going to sink any more money into them than it has to. It wouldn't be a prudent use of funds. The bathroom renovations are absolutely necessary. The seating and carpeting come in a close second. Other than that, the price tag would be astronomical to fully revamp the check-in, baggage claim and other areas which are stuffy and cramped (read: pretty much every part of the old terminals). Then we would probably have to suffer through you calling the newly refurbished terminals as monuments of ego to the DFW board and how much better Houston's Intercontinental is.

    At some point, Terminal F will be built. When completed, the old terminals will be razed with new ones built in their place as needed/in sequence. Their designs are simply too outdated to update to a world-class standard like Terminal D. A clean sheet is needed.

    My humble opinion, anyway.

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    Quote Originally Posted by interestedobserver
    This reminds me of the story of Goldilocks and the Three Bears. Terminal D was too expensive, old terminal enhancements aren't enough... I wonder what would be just right?
    Terminal D appears to have been one of the most expensive, if not the most expensive (calculated on a per gate basis), airport terminal building ever constructed... in contrast, it appears that virtually nothing has been done to improve the landside facilities at DFW since the airport's initial construction nearly 40 years ago.

  34. #684
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    Quote Originally Posted by interestedobserver
    Here's my take: DFW realizes that the old terminals have lived most of their useful life, and the airport isn't going to sink any more money into them than it has to. It wouldn't be a prudent use of funds. The bathroom renovations are absolutely necessary. The seating and carpeting come in a close second. Other than that, the price tag would be astronomical to fully revamp the check-in, baggage claim and other areas which are stuffy and cramped (read: pretty much every part of the old terminals).
    That makes sense... it would be nice to be clued into their thought process, however. Also, assuming that to be the case, why not reserve part of the Chesapeake windfall for this future project?

    Quote Originally Posted by interestedobserver
    Then we would probably have to suffer through you calling the newly refurbished terminals as monuments of ego to the DFW board and how much better Houston's Intercontinental is.
    Not as long as it is built with some sort of rational, consumer-sensitive budget... and avoids necessitating an excessive increase in user charges.

    Quote Originally Posted by interestedobserver
    At some point, Terminal F will be built. When completed, the old terminals will be razed with new ones built in their place as needed/in sequence. Their designs are simply too outdated to update to a world-class standard like Terminal D. A clean sheet is needed.

    My humble opinion, anyway.
    And a good one it is!

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    Quote Originally Posted by PuddinHead
    Simple, Delta and and Airtran went to DFW and went head to head with the other airlines unlike Southwest.
    Both of those airlines lost a lot of money in the process and were unsuccessful in their attempt to provide North Texas with the competition you say you want. I have no doubt that you are already keenly aware of that. You know full well that Southwest would lose fistfuls of money were it to challenge AA's 900 flight DFW schedule with anything between 10 and 100 flights. You already know this because that's what happened to all the other airlines. If you really wanted air travel competition in North Texas you would be advocating for more service from secondary airports in the area. The current environment at DFW makes it impossible for any meaningful competition to take place.

  36. #686
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    Quote Originally Posted by PuddinHead
    Why do you suggest that we should have to enable airlines in order to have competition?
    That's the way it's done, right? Every airport in the world enables the airlines which use the facility to serve the local population.

    There are some world class goals for DFW airport, and I think there's an excellent chance the airport will meet them. Hoping to deliver the goods to make future claims as the premier airport in the global markteplace is big deal. If DFW airport does not enable airlines with a competitive advantage, there's little hope. It's a gutsy move to build a facility as appealling as any in the world, even more gutsy to build it before the local (North Texas) economy and demography develops the global relationships to supply the O/D passenger volume putting some sense to the Internation Terminal's capacity.

    Quote Originally Posted by PuddinHead
    Why should we care what Southwest would lose? Airport capacity is not an issue in the Dallas, Ft Worth area and maintaining separate airports to support a single specific airline is a waste of resources.
    Lets keep this discussion on this thread focused on the world class goals of DFW Airport. There is a more appropriate thread for that worn out dialogue.
    Last edited by tamtagon; 11 June 2007 at 12:44 PM.

  37. #687
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    Quote Originally Posted by PuddinHead
    I hope to see him answer the question why should we care what Southwest could lose at DFW. Why as a region are we forced to put an airlines, any airlines needs ahead of our own goals?
    I swear you are obsessed with Southwest.

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    Quote Originally Posted by PuddinHead
    His reply suggested that DFW exists only for AA and that the only hope for airline competition in this region is to pander to the airlines the hope of personal airports aka: the current situation at Love Field. Which is the biggest obstacle to the goals of DFW airport becomming the world class airport we need here in this region.

    I hope to see him answer the question why should we care what Southwest could lose at DFW. Why as a region are we forced to put an airlines, any airlines needs ahead of our own goals?
    Any business that cannot make money selling a service or product won't be around long to offer that product to consumers. Consumers will then be faced with purchasing from a single entity in the marketplace. When consumers have no choice that service is bad and the prices are high.

    Imagine a deregulated electric market with only one electric generation provider. That one electric provider would charge very high prices and deliver very poor customer service without fear of losing business. That environment would suffocate local business growth and expansion and we all suffer.

    So we know that kind of environment is bad for everybody. We also know that more than 6 airlines have tried to establish a meaningful presence at DFW and all of them have failed. Why haven't any of the airlines that have tried to establish any meaningful amount of flight operations at DFW ever been successful? Simple, AA, with over 900 flights can flood the DFW markets of its competition with more supply than demand for seats and at prices that prohibit any carrier from making money. This action in these markets may represent 1 or 2% of AA's DFW operations and is certainly sustainable. But for the new entrant or the carrier with a relatively small presence at DFW it represents 100% of their DFW operations and is not sustainable. Thus, the new entrant is driven out of the market. If companies the size of Delta cannot sustain the flooding of markets, then there is no realistic opportunity for any carrier to establish meaningful operations at DFW and all of North Texas suffers from very high prices and poor customer service.

    The answer to the cycle that we are stuck in with DFW and AA is to make it significantly more expensive for AA to flood markets and drive out competition. You do that through the use of secondary airports. It's very expensive for AA to set up a separate set of operations at Ft. Worth Meacham just to try and flood the market of a competitor. Not only can AA not leverage the existing operations and personnel at DFW, but they will also be cutting their own local traffic to DFW with the passengers going to Meacham. This hurts the revenue performance on existing DFW flights which by the very nature of a hub operation has too many flights for the local demand. It also means that the Meacham operation cannot subsidize its flights with connecting traffic because all the connecting flights are at DFW. So, it becomes very expensive for AA to run a competitor out of the market from a secondary airport.

    That is why we need multiple secondary airports, like Meacham, Love and McKinney. The traveling public will then have its choice of convenient locations and airlines all competing for our business. That means we get better service at lower prices and we become a very attractive location for businesses and the jobs and growth they bring. That is the environment that exists in southern California, with 5 metro airports, northern California, Chicago, southern Florida, NY metro area, Houston, etc. Both Atlanta and Phoenix officials are beginning the planning for secondary airports.

    P. Head, your dream of a glorious DFW empire dominated by AA is not good for the public. It benefits a very select few to the detriment of the vast majority of North Texans.

  39. #689
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    Quote Originally Posted by DallasNative
    Why haven't any of the airlines that have tried to establish any meaningful amount of flight operations at DFW ever been successful? Simple, AA, with over 900 flights can flood the DFW markets of its competition with more supply than demand for seats and at prices that prohibit any carrier from making money.
    Extremely well written, but you've left out another point, which I've mentioned before: AA uses its effective control of the DFW Airport Board to:
    1) Obtain disproportionate shares of airport revenues; and
    2) Shift airline operating costs to other carriers.

    As examples, consider the following:
    1) It appears that AA has been allowed to make money by master-leasing all of Terminals A & C, then sub-letting the retail space to tenants at a healty markup. This diverts profits that all airlines could have divvied up into a pool for AA, exclusively.
    2) All airport terminals are required to use AA Federal Credit Union ATM, exclusively. This allows AA to reduce the cost of that operation, thereby delivering an AA employee benefit at the expense of all airline customers passing through any terminal (AA or other).
    3) DFW Airport spends significant advertising dollars promoting itself in AA's inflight magazine.... which is bizarre, since a substantial portion of AA's customers are already forced to fly through DFW. In contrast, they don't spend any money purchasing ads in the inflight magazines of AA's competitors.
    4) DFW Airport appears to concentrate its promotional budget in geographic regions serviced by AA exclusively (i.e. Asia, Latin America), rather than markets serviced by other carriers as well (i.e. Great Britain, Germany, Canada). This allows AA to receive the near exclusive benefit of these promotional dollars.
    5) DFW Airport has historically spent millions of dollars in lobbying and promotional activities defending the Wright Amendment... something all other airlines are either indifferent towards or opposed to. AA, alone, appears to benefit from this effort.
    6) Requiring all airlines to fund the cost of the inter-terminal air train, notwithstanding the fact that the primary purpose of this high speed train is to facilitate AA hub connecting traffic.

  40. #690
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    Quote Originally Posted by UptownDallas
    Extremely well written, but you've left out another point, which I've mentioned before: AA uses its effective control of the DFW Airport Board to:
    1) Obtain disproportionate shares of airport revenues; and
    2) Shift airline operating costs to other carriers.

    As examples, consider the following:
    1) It appears that AA has been allowed to make money by master-leasing all of Terminals A & C, then sub-letting the retail space to tenants at a healty markup. This diverts profits that all airlines could have divvied up into a pool for AA, exclusively.
    2) All airport terminals are required to use AA Federal Credit Union ATM, exclusively. This allows AA to reduce the cost of that operation, thereby delivering an AA employee benefit at the expense of all airline customers passing through any terminal (AA or other).
    3) DFW Airport spends significant advertising dollars promoting itself in AA's inflight magazine.... which is bizarre, since a substantial portion of AA's customers are already forced to fly through DFW. In contrast, they don't spend any money purchasing ads in the inflight magazines of AA's competitors.
    4) DFW Airport appears to concentrate its promotional budget in geographic regions serviced by AA exclusively (i.e. Asia, Latin America), rather than markets serviced by other carriers as well (i.e. Great Britain, Germany, Canada). This allows AA to receive the near exclusive benefit of these promotional dollars.
    5) DFW Airport has historically spent millions of dollars in lobbying and promotional activities defending the Wright Amendment... something all other airlines are either indifferent towards or opposed to. AA, alone, appears to benefit from this effort.
    6) Requiring all airlines to fund the cost of the inter-terminal air train, notwithstanding the fact that the primary purpose of this high speed train is to facilitate AA hub connecting traffic.
    You are absolutely right. Thank you for supplementing my response with your insight into the cozy bed of DFW and AA. This relationship screams conflict of interest and the best term I've seen to describe the relationship is one used by a Economics professor in Minnesota to describe the relationship between Northwest Airlines and the Minneapolis airport board as a captured regulator beholden to a single corporate entity.

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    Quote Originally Posted by PuddinHead
    What is wrong with your premise that secondary airports are the answer? Simple there is no market that you can serve from any secondary airport in this region that cannot be served from DFW. If a competitor from DFW wants to flood the markets of a competitor it will not matter what secondary airport the competitor flies from.

    What you are doing is espousing a myth that serves as an excuse for the actions of one airline. When we reach the saturation point seen in Chicago or the New York Area and even the Los Angeles basin then secondary airports will make sense. Until then lets grow DFW.
    It's not about one airline, be it Southwest or AA, its about what's in the public's best interest since it is public infrastructure governed by public officials. Using secondary airports to prevent a single carrier from dominating the marketplace is in the public's best interest. One airline, especially one with a hub and spoke system, could not dominate 2 or 3 local airports, it would just be too unprofitable. That would guarantee that we would have an environment where other carriers could come to the North Texas marketplace and provide a competitive service. The public wins with a choice of airports that is convienent to their particular location in North Texas, lower prices and better customer service.

  42. #692
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tnekster
    I swear you are obsessed with Southwest.
    I don't understand why seemingly rational folks continue trying to have a rational conversation with an obviously irrational individual....
    The bottom line is, it never ever works.... :crycloud:
    "Liberalism: Moochers Electing Looters to Steal from Producers."

  43. #693
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    Quote Originally Posted by TexasPlus
    I don't understand why seemingly rational folks continue trying to have a rational conversation with an obviously irrational individual....
    The bottom line is, it never ever works.... :crycloud:
    True, but it's kind of like playing "BrickBreaker" on my Blackberry... just something to do.

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    U.S. News & World Reports Airport Rankings

    U.S. News & World Report has just released its ranking of the 47 largest airports in the U.S. using something called the "Misery Index," which calcuates a score based on a combination of % late flights and load factor (crowding).

    Results are pretty interesting:

    Love Field ranked as the 4th best , beat out only by San Jose, Houston Hobby and Oakland.

    DFW, on the other hand, ranked as #38 (10th worst). Detroit, O'Hare, Charlotte, JFK, Minneapolis, Fort Lauderdale, Miami and Las Vegas scored worse.

  45. #695
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    Quote Originally Posted by UptownDallas
    U.S. News & World Report has just released its ranking of the 47 largest airports in the U.S. using something called the "Misery Index," which calcuates a score based on a combination of % late flights and load factor (crowding).
    Don't think it's fair to use load factor. That punishes an airport for being popular or having an airline that's making money (or at least losing less than it might otherwise).

  46. #696
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    Quote Originally Posted by JaeTex
    Don't think it's fair to use load factor. That punishes an airport for being popular or having an airline that's making money (or at least losing less than it might otherwise).
    The purpose of the survey is to measure passenger comfort, not profitability.

    Even if it were to measure profitability, your assumption would prove to be incorrect. Southwest Airlines, for example, operates a business model which runs at lower load factors than the legacy carriers (AA, CO, NW, DL, US, UA), yet they consistently generate the highest profits.

  47. #697
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    proposes closing both airports and splitting the land in favor of a bigger better airport to the south. The current setup and arguments are a mess.

  48. #698
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    would rather not see Waco joining the NCTCOG for a while longer, if it's all the same to you.

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    at this rate, Sherman and Denison will, so what's the difference?

  50. #700
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    Quote Originally Posted by I45Tex
    would rather not see Waco joining the NCTCOG for a while longer, if it's all the same to you.
    Waco has it's own COG. It is the Heart of Texas Council of Governments or HOTCOG for short.

    http://www.hotcog.org/

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