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Thread: DFW wants to be the premier airport in the global marketplace

  1. #501
    Administrator dfwcre8tive's Avatar
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    Departing? D/FW Airport wants you to first go on a shopping trip
    08:17 AM CST on Thursday, November 9, 2006
    By SUZANNE MARTA / The Dallas Morning News

    Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport's year-old Terminal D buzzes with travelers sipping wine at La Bodega winery, checking out gadgets at Brookstone or sampling the tamales at area favorites such as Reata Grill.

    But in the airport's older terminals, it's another story.

    Standing near Gate B17, the only concessionaires you can see are a hot dog stand and a Starbucks that's partially blocked by construction. It doesn't exactly inspire a traveler to shop.

    D/FW officials are trying to change that. Aiming to boost revenue from sources other than financially strapped tenant airlines, the airport is hoping to make travelers feel – and spend – more like they're in a shopping mall.

    Excluding duty-free sales, the average D/FW passenger spent about $5.79 last year – well below the $7.05 industry average.

    If each of D/FW's departing passengers were to spend $1 more in the terminals, it would add $30 million in annual revenue, lifting total concession revenue nearly 15 percent.

    "We have more than 150,000 people walking through our terminals with money in their pockets, and they're hungry and they want to shop," said Joe Lopano, who heads D/FW's marketing efforts. "We want to capitalize on that."

    To do that, officials have launched an $800,000 marketing campaign that includes banners and billboards on and off the airport property, aboard parking shuttles and in the concourses.

    Research conducted by D/FW earlier this year showed that travelers were willing to shop but weren't aware of the shopping and dining options the airport offered.

    "You don't have a line of sight to be able to see there's a T.G.I. Friday's around the corner," Mr. Lopano said, referring to the horseshoe shape of D/FW's original four terminals.

    To alleviate that problem, airport officials divided the terminals into retail "neighborhoods" and posted signs that show restaurants and shops within a 10-minute walk – the distance customers said they'd be willing to go.

    Nearly half of those surveyed said they'd even be willing to take the airport's Skylink train, which can connect a traveler to any of the other D/FW terminals – and shopping options – within about 5 minutes.

    The airport has made some other adjustments.

    In international Terminal D, vertical signs include pictures of nearby food options, an approach some concessionaires said has proved successful.

    "People are more visual," said Don Mitchell, an airport concessionaire who runs Blue Mesa and Blue Bamboo in Terminal D and several Freshens frozen yogurt stands in the other terminals. "When they can see pictures of something, they're more likely to go there."

    Mr. Mitchell said he's noticed customers wander more around Terminal D, looking at the various art installations and shopping. "In the older terminals, they tend to stay closer to their gate," he said.

    Terminal D's mix of higher-end retailers and restaurants has also translated into higher sales. In that terminal, the average passenger spent 45 percent more than the airportwide figure.

    About 60 stanchions filled with shopping guides are scattered through all the terminals showing nearby concessionaires. Pocket-size booklets list all the concessions throughout the airport. Like a mall, the airport will launch seasonal campaigns, promoting shopping periods before Christmas or Mother's Day.

    Shopping and other concession revenues have taken on more importance to D/FW, which is looking to ease the costs of its airline tenants.

    Traffic patterns have changed dramatically since the 9/11 terrorist attacks.

    Local travelers arrive at the airport earlier for added security. Meanwhile, American Airlines Inc. has changed its schedule at its D/FW hub, so that many connecting passengers wait longer between flights.

    As a result, "dwell" time inside D/FW's terminals has stretched to as much as two hours. That extra time presents a customer service issue for the airport as travelers try to be productive – or at least be entertained.

    Meanwhile, the elimination of meal service in coach on most domestic flights means travelers want more food options at the airport.

    During the last five years, concession sales have risen more than 50 percent.

    Mark Knight, regional director for developer BAA USA Inc., said U.S. airports' focus on driving retail sales has intensified during the last five years.

    "It's not acceptable anymore to have an airport that doesn't generate great retail sales," Mr. Knight said. "Maximizing revenues at the airport is critical to making sure airlines have a better operating environment."

    BAA USA, whose parent company runs London's Heathrow and Gatwick airports, among several others, pioneered the movement in the U.S. 15 years ago, transforming the concessions at Pittsburgh International Airport by introducing street pricing and attracting mall mainstays such as the Gap and Johnston & Murphy. The airport is now the industry leader, with 2006 sales per passenger exceeding $13.

    The street pricing initiative proved important in changing perceptions that airport shops were more expensive than those in a mall.

    For more than a decade, D/FW has enforced pricing rules that allow concessionaires to charge no more than 10 percent higher than their counterparts away from the airport.

    Airport customers tend to be more affluent than those in a typical mall, making them an attractive target for retailers.

    "These are people with more money than time," Mr. Knight said. "If you can offer something they want at a reasonable price, it's amazing how much business you can do."

    E-mail smarta@dallasnews.com

    AIRPORT SHOPPING

    Spending at newsstands, restaurants and stores at airports has been growing as travelers spend more time in terminals. Here’s how the top performing North American airports compare:

    Rank


    Airport


    Average sales per departing passenger*

    1.


    Pittsburgh


    $12.27

    2.


    New York (JFK):


    $9.62

    3.


    San Francisco


    $9.16

    4.


    Newark, N.J.


    $9.05

    5.


    Calgary, Alberta


    $8.98

    6.


    Honolulu


    $8.81

    7.


    Portland, Ore.


    $8.65

    8.


    Anchorage, Alaska


    $8.54

    9.


    Las Vegas


    $8.26

    10.


    Washington, D.C. (Reagan)


    $8.06

    11.


    Boston


    $7.91

    12.


    Miami


    $7.90

    13.


    Savannah, Ga.


    $7.78

    14.


    Detroit


    $7.77

    15.


    Seattle


    $7.27

    16.


    Denver


    $7.22

    17.


    Toronto


    $7.21

    18.**


    Philadelphia


    $7.20

    19.


    Indianapolis


    $7.20

    20.


    Los Angeles


    $7.05

    21.


    Minneapolis/St. Paul


    $7.04

    22.


    Cincinnati


    $.6.94

    23.


    West Palm Beach, Fla.


    $6.92

    24.


    Orlando, Fla.


    $6.87

    25.


    St. Louis


    $6.85

    26.


    New York (LaGuardia)


    $6.84

    27.


    Chicago (O’Hare)


    $6.82

    28.


    Phoenix


    $6.76

    29.**


    Tampa, Fla.


    $6.64

    30.


    Atlantic City, N.J.


    $6.64

    31.


    Atlanta


    $6.51

    32.


    Charlotte, N.C.


    $6.36

    33.


    Salt Lake City


    $6.32

    34.


    Baltimore


    $6.24

    35.


    Reno, Nev.


    $6.20

    36.


    San Antonio


    $6.09

    37.


    Memphis, Tenn.


    $6.02

    38.


    Columbus, Ohio


    $6

    39.


    Nashville, Tenn.


    $5.98

    40.


    Washington D.C. (Dulles)


    $5.95

    41.


    Sacramento, Calif.


    $5.92

    42.


    Sarasota/Bradenton (Florida)


    $5.84

    43.


    Austin


    $5.82

    44.


    Dallas/Fort Worth


    $5.79

    45.


    Milwaukee, Wis.


    $5.78

    46.


    Fort Lauderdale, Fla.


    $5.69

    47.


    Fresno, Calif.


    $5.50

    48.


    Santa Ana, Calif.


    $5.47

    49.


    Albany, N.Y.


    $5.36

    50.


    Raleigh-Durham, N.C.


    $5.30




    Average


    $7.05

    *Figures are for 2005. Excludes sales of duty-free items

    **In cases of a tie, the airport with higher total sales ranks higher.

    SOURCE: Airport Revenue News

  2. #502
    Administrator tamtagon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by njjeppson
    08:17 AM CST on Thursday, November 9, 2006
    By SUZANNE MARTA / The Dallas Morning News
    ...
    Nearly half of those surveyed said they'd even be willing to take the airport's Skylink train, which can connect a traveler to any of the other D/FW terminals – and shopping options – within about 5 minutes.
    Transit oriented retail development inside the airport?

  3. #503
    High-Rise Member TexasPlus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by njjeppson
    Departing? D/FW Airport wants you to first go on a shopping trip


    Orlando, Fla.


    $6.87

    25.
    The ranking of DFW does not surprised me. But I am surprised at how low Orlando MCO ranked in shopping money spent. It is one of two airports that remind me most of being Mall like. The other is Schiphol airport in Amsterdam.
    "Liberalism: Moochers Electing Looters to Steal from Producers."

  4. #504
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    TSA and Grand Hyatt DFW Launch Pilot Program Giving Hotel Guests Access to Secured Side of Terminal D at DFW International Airport
    Wednesday December 6, 12:15 pm ET

    DALLAS--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Grand Hyatt DFW, adjoined to the state-of-the-art International Terminal D at DFW International Airport, today announced that the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) has recently given the hotel authorization to implement a unique pilot program - Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport Access Authorization to Commercial Establishments Beyond the Screening Checkpoint Pilot Program (AAACE Program). TSA's AAACE Program gives qualifying hotel guests staying at the Grand Hyatt DFW an opportunity to proceed through security screening at Terminal D in order to gain access to the facility's specialty shops, restaurants and other commercial establishments. The AAACE Program is voluntary and is limited to only registered overnight guests at the Grand Hyatt DFW. It is being conducted by TSA in cooperation with the hotel and the DFW Airport Board, the hotel's operator...

    http://biz.yahoo.com/bw/061206/20061206005712.html?.v=1

  5. #505
    Administrator dfwcre8tive's Avatar
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    TSA considers allowing some non-travelers to reach airport gates at DFW

    VIDEO STORY

  6. #506
    The Urban Pragmatist Mballar's Avatar
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    I knew it would only be a matter of time before the TSA eased the restrictions. . .especially at DFW. Many of those vendors negotiated their leases based upon pre-9/11 revenue history. Surely, the airport has had to allow the DFW vendors significant discounts in lease payments because there is no way they could pay the rent when those vendors can not now only rely on non-passenger traffic, as they did before. I know that when I go through the airport (mostly Terminals A & C), there is little to no traffic in those stores/restaurants.
    A wise man speaks because he has something to say; a fool because he has to say something. - Plato

  7. #507
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    Limited-access terminals aren't secure in the slightest. Anyone who has every printed a boarding pass online can forge a new one with updated flight and date information using only Microsoft Word.

    I could go to Terminal D and hang out all day long if I wanted to. And nobody would know. These security measures are a pointless inconvenience. Anyone who wants to circumvent them, can.

  8. #508
    Administrator dfwcre8tive's Avatar
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    DFW also has several security entrances scattered throughout the terminals, so allowing non-ticketed passengers through security probably would not affect lines or wait times at checkpoints.

  9. #509
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    D/FW ranked 3rd busiest airport
    01:46 PM CST on Thursday, January 4, 2007
    Associated Press

    ATLANTA – For the second year in a row, Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport has retained its title as the nation's busiest in terms of flights, according to government data released Thursday.

    Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport was ranked third, with 702,713 flights in 2006, down 2.2 percent from 718,207 flights in 2005, the FAA said.

    The Atlanta airport logged 976,307 flights in 2006, down 0.4 percent from its 980,386 flights in 2005, the Federal Aviation Administration said. Flights include takeoffs and landings.

    Its rival, Chicago O'Hare International Airport, was listed second busiest, with 958,643 flights in 2006. That number was down 1.4 percent from the 972,246 flights it had in 2005, the FAA said.

    Atlanta and Chicago have run neck-and-neck in recent years to claim the title of the nation's – and therefore, the world's – busiest airport. Atlanta already claimed to be the world's busiest airport in terms of passengers. The FAA does not maintain passenger statistics.

    Atlanta airport spokeswoman Sterling Payne cited two reasons for the airport's ranking: "Its capacity and efficiency."

    She said opening a fifth runway in May benefited the airport and last year's expansion of international flights by Delta Air Lines Inc. – which has its primary hub in Atlanta – also was another factor that caused the Atlanta airport to remain the nation's busiest.

    "We had a total paradigm change looking at Delta's travel patterns," Payne said.

    O'Hare spokeswoman Wendy Abrams said in a statement that officials there were not surprised that the Atlanta airport had more flights in 2006.

    "O'Hare's flight restrictions, which are scheduled to expire next year, have limited our ability to land and depart aircraft and, ultimately, meet the demand for air service that continues to grow at our airport," Abrams said.

    But she said city officials are "committed to maintaining Chicago's role as the leading aviation market." A massive expansion plan for O'Hare is expected to be finished in 2013.

    Chicago's other major airport, Midway Airport, had 298,547 flights in 2006, up 2.7 percent from the 290,756 flights it had in 2005, the federal agency said. Abrams said Midway does not have flight restrictions and can add new slots for flights based on market demand.

    In July, based on data for the first six months of 2006, O'Hare was listed by the FAA as the nation's busiest airport with 477,001 flights compared to Atlanta's 472,431 flights. But Payne said the Atlanta airport had more flights in the latter part of the year.

  10. #510
    Incoherent Rambler grantboston's Avatar
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    Cincinnati's sky-high airfares are tops in the USA
    Updated 1/3/2007 4:02 PM ET
    By Alexander Coolidge, The Cincinnati Enquirer

    HEBRON, Ky. — With the average round-trip ticket costing $570, Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International (CVG) continues to be the nation's most expensive major airport to fly to or from.

    The airport topped the ticket price charts from April to June of 2006 — the third straight quarter — according to the latest fare price report issued by the U.S. Department of Transportation's office of aviation analysis.

    With the airport dominated by Delta Air Lines' second-largest hub, ticket prices have long been the target of criticism as CVG consistently places among the most expensive major airports in government statistics. The last time CVG wasn't No. 1 was during the third quarter of 2005 — when it was No. 5.

    Delta operates more than 80% of the flights here.

    Airport officials say they've worked to get fares lower, but when new low-cost competition comes in, Delta lowers its rates and the newcomer pulls out.

    "We try to work with all our carriers to control our cost to them in hopes to get fares down, but never stop talking to low-cost carriers," airport spokesman Ted Bushelman said.

    The Hebron airport recently landed service from a smaller low-cost carrier. Southern Skyways announced in the fall that it would offer, starting in March, twice weekly direct service to Charleston, W.Va., and service to Myrtle Beach, S.C. The airport also has low-cost service to Fort Myers, Fla., and Cancun from USA 3000 Airlines.

    Cincinnati was recently passed over by low-cost AirTran Airways, which polled its customers to suggest where to add service. The Orlando, carrier listed CVG on a list of 50 potential new destinations. Phoenix won.

    Delta officials have defended local fares in the past, saying they cover the costs of offering direct service to more than 120 destinations, including Europe, Mexico and the Caribbean.

    Local fliers won relief from high fares in the summer of 2004 through early 2005, as Delta tinkered with its pricing before filing for bankruptcy in the fall of 2005.

    Rounding out the top five most-expensive major airports with average round-trip fares: No. 2, San Francisco International Airport, $494; No. 3, Dulles International Airport in Washington, D.C., $448; No. 4 (tie), Newark International Airport in New Jersey and Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport, $448.

    The Cincinnati Enquirer is owned by Gannett, parent company of USA TODAY.
    © Copyright 2006 USA TODAY
    http://www.usatoday.com/travel/fligh...airfares_x.htm

  11. #511
    Skyscraper Member LakeHighlands's Avatar
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    Dfwia???

    I’m so sorry for doing this but…

    This is driving me insane!!!!!!! Where did yall come up with DFWIA?

    I have never heard Dallas/ Fort Worth International Airport referred to as DFWIA.
    I have lived in Dallas long before DFW was ever built and to this day I have never heard anyone refer to the airport as DFWIA.

    I know the airport itself does not refer to itself as DFWIA, but simply DFW for short.
    See their website
    http://www.dfwairport.com/index.html

    I also know IATA (International Air Transport Association) location identifier, which is the proper abbreviation for Dallas Fort Worth International Airport is DFW. The FAA and everyone in the aviation industry use the abbreviation DFW and not DFWIA.

    http://www.dfwairport.com/airport/br.../identity.html

    I also asked a few of my aviation friends and son who is also a pilot and a graduate of Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, if they ever used and heard any one call DFW, DFWIA. Everyone said no.

    My flight instructing days are long over, but had I ever heard a student call DFW, DFWIA, I would land the plane and send little Johnny home to go study.

    DFWIA reminds me of DIA aka Denver International Airport

    I think DFWIA just makes it more confusing than simply DFW Airport or just DFW.

    I’m sorry for my rant but I guess it is just the pilot in me …oh I cringed every time I had to type DFWIA…….(first time in my life and at my age that says a lot)



    "One of Dallas' strongest communities, Lake Highlands boasts a true sense of neighborhood spirit. Local stores reflect passionate support for Lake Highlands schools with school posters and signs. True to its name, the area features handsome traditional homes up and down rolling hills and charming, winding roads." --Lake Highlands People

  12. #512
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    Quote Originally Posted by LakeHighlands
    I’m so sorry for doing this but…

    This is driving me insane!!!!!!! Where did yall come up with DFWIA?

    I have never heard Dallas/ Fort Worth International Airport referred to as DFWIA.
    I have lived in Dallas long before DFW was ever built and to this day I have never heard anyone refer to the airport as DFWIA.

    I know the airport itself does not refer to itself as DFWIA, but simply DFW for short.
    See their website
    http://www.dfwairport.com/index.html

    I also know IATA (International Air Transport Association) location identifier, which is the proper abbreviation for Dallas Fort Worth International Airport is DFW. The FAA and everyone in the aviation industry use the abbreviation DFW and not DFWIA.

    http://www.dfwairport.com/airport/br.../identity.html

    I also asked a few of my aviation friends and son who is also a pilot and a graduate of Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, if they ever used and heard any one call DFW, DFWIA. Everyone said no.

    My flight instructing days are long over, but had I ever heard a student call DFW, DFWIA, I would land the plane and send little Johnny home to go study.

    DFWIA reminds me of DIA aka Denver International Airport

    I think DFWIA just makes it more confusing than simply DFW Airport or just DFW.

    I’m sorry for my rant but I guess it is just the pilot in me …oh I cringed every time I had to type DFWIA…….(first time in my life and at my age that says a lot)



    Man, I totally agree with your statement. I refuse to say DFWIA. It's DFW and always will. I'm a pilot too, and everyone know it as DFW. No ones gonna call it DFWIA.

  13. #513
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    I agree too... I'm not sure when the brainiacs on the board changed it but they did...it's stupid.

  14. #514
    In the O.R. Geaux Tigers's Avatar
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    Yeah, please call it DFW like the FAA refers to it as.
    By the power of greyskull!

  15. #515
    Administrator dfwcre8tive's Avatar
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    I agree. It's DFW or DFW International Airport. I worked on the Terminal Parking campaign now up on billboards and around the airport.

  16. #516
    High-Rise Member TexasPlus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LakeHighlands

    I also know IATA (International Air Transport Association) location identifier, which is the proper abbreviation for Dallas Fort Worth International Airport is DFW. The FAA and everyone in the aviation industry use the abbreviation DFW and not DFWIA.
    Not everyone, you forgot about the ever present ICAO airport designation codes. KDFW

    ICAO airport code
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    The ICAO airport code (IPA pronunciation: [aɪ'keɪˌjo]) or location indicator is a four-letter alphanumeric code designating each airport around the world. These codes are defined by the International Civil Aviation Organization and published in ICAO Document 7910: Location Indicators.

    The ICAO codes are used by air traffic control and airline operations such as flight planning. They are not the same as the IATA codes encountered by the general public, which are used for airline timetables, reservations, and baggage handling. ICAO codes are also used to identify other locations such as weather stations, International Flight Service Stations or Area Control Centers, whether or not they are located at airports.

    Unlike the IATA codes, the ICAO codes have a regional structure, are not duplicated and are comprehensive. In general, the first letter is allocated by continent and represents a country or group of countries within that continent. The second letter generally represents a country within that region, and the remaining two are used to identify each airport. The exception to this rule are larger countries that have single-letter country codes, where the remaining three letters identify the airport.

    In the contiguous United States and Canada, most airports have been assigned three-letter IATA codes which are the same as their ICAO code without the leading K or C. e.g., YYC (Calgary International Airport, Calgary, Alberta) and CYYC, IAD (Dulles International Airport, Chantilly, Virginia) and KIAD. These codes are not to be confused with radio or television call signs, even though both countries use four-letter call signs starting with those letters.

    However, because Alaska, Hawaiʻi and other United States territories have their own 2-letter ICAO prefix, the situation there is similar to other smaller countries and the ICAO code of their airports is typically different from its corresponding 3-letter FAA/IATA identifier. For example, Hilo International Airport (PHTO vs ITO) and Juneau International Airport (PAJN vs JNU).
    "Liberalism: Moochers Electing Looters to Steal from Producers."

  17. #517
    Skyscraper Member LakeHighlands's Avatar
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    Oh yes the “paper work” identifier.

    I did not forget about ICAO code, I just left it out for the sake of confusion to the general public. I think the general public is more aware of the KDFW and so forth as being used in the communications with broadcast station such as KDFW Fox 4 which is not to be confused with the KDFW which is DFW Airport code by ICAO. Sure you write KDFW for flight plans, air navigation, METAR report etc. (I think the vast majority of people would not need to ever obtain a METAR report, and if they did, I doubt they could read one.) I should of said that KDFW is also used as an abbrevation in air navagation.

    Still I would say we are going to DFW and not KDFW. Almost all airports in the lower 48 have a K in front of their IATA code so the “K” is just like a silent prefix that used. The IATA code which is also the FAA Identifier is the most important part of the information.

    In terms of knowledge and confusion to the public I would put ICAO code KDFW in with words Maverick, Cowboy, and Ranger (I’m not talking about the sports teams). Maverick and Cowboy are VOR/DME and Ranger is VORTAC used in air navigation. In case anyone wants to know what Maverick or Cowboy looks like, if you ever enter DFW Airport using the south entrance and look in between the freeway lanes right after the tollbooth, you will see a big white antenna looking structure. That is the Maverick VOR/DME and just off of I-35 to the west south of Royal you can see Cowboy VOR/DME.


    Quote Originally Posted by TexasPlus
    , IAD (Dulles International Airport, Chantilly, Virginia)
    See this is a good example why a person can not just take the airport name and try to use the first letters of each word of the name of an airport as an abbreviation. If someone abbreviated Dulles International Airport DIA, that would be incorrect as DIA is Denver International Airport.

    Anyways earlier I was just pointing that out about DFW.
    "One of Dallas' strongest communities, Lake Highlands boasts a true sense of neighborhood spirit. Local stores reflect passionate support for Lake Highlands schools with school posters and signs. True to its name, the area features handsome traditional homes up and down rolling hills and charming, winding roads." --Lake Highlands People

  18. #518
    High-Rise Member TexasPlus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LakeHighlands
    I did not forget about ICAO code, I just left it out for the sake of confusion to the general public.
    Having been involved with aviation since before my birth(1), I have never had the luxury of looking at aviation from the point of view of the general public. :angel:

    The absolute statement "The FAA and everyone in the aviation industry use the abbreviation DFW and not DFWIA." was not accurate, hence I stand by my correction. :beat:


    (1)Dad was a "Barn Stormer" taking folks for plane rides in his OX5 powered Jenny when he met and marred my Mom in the 30's.
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  19. #519
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    D/FW plugging into need for outlets
    Airport conducts survey on recharging batteries on the fly

    11:06 PM CST on Wednesday, January 10, 2007
    By SUZANNE MARTA / The Dallas Morning News

    When Robert Justice arrives at his gate for a flight, he automatically scans for any available outlets under chairs or along the walls.

    "I've even moved furniture and displays to be able to plug in," said Mr. Justice, who travels 42 weeks a year for his job as a systems engineer.

    Keeping electronic gadgetry juiced up is a growing frustration for business travelers, who are carrying more devices and waiting longer in airports, in part because of added security.

    Replenishing computer and cellphone batteries between flights often entails sitting on the airport floor. Some travelers inadvertently create tripwires as their power cords stretch between power outlets and their seats.

    For Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport, that frustration may prove to be an opportunity.

    With help from a group of graduate business students at Texas Christian University, D/FW is studying whether adding amenities such as power outlets could attract more connecting passengers.

    Connecting passengers are crucial for D/FW, accounting for about two-thirds of the airport's 60 million passengers each year.

    Through their spending on concessions and services, those travelers benefit the airport. As D/FW handles more connecting passengers, it's able to add flights, offering better travel choices for local fliers.

    The group from TCU will spend several months conducting surveys of D/FW passengers, comparing services at other airports, creating benchmarks and developing a strategy that makes the most of the airport's investments and sales opportunities.

    Making the circuit


    D/FW isn't alone in its efforts to add more technology-friendly amenities to its gate areas.

    Southwest Airlines Co. recently installed two prototypes of powered charging stations near gates 12 and 14 at Dallas Love Field. The Dallas-based discounter is considering installing the stations at other airports.

    Across the U.S., airports are replacing banks of pay phones with workstations, adding power outlets to tables in food courts and installing "power poles" in seating areas.

    Almost 70 percent of passengers carry some kind of electronic device with them when they fly, according to a recent survey commissioned by D/FW.

    "If you walk in our terminals, you'll see people on the floor or by the trash bins plugging in," said Ken Buchanan, the airport's executive vice president of revenue management.

    Part of the problem is that fitting gate areas with additional wall outlets is expensive.

    During the last few weeks, D/FW has been testing "Pump Up Your Portables" stations in each of its five terminals, kiosks that allow travelers to buy access to power at their seats in 30-minute increments.

    Kiosk developer AdComp Systems Inc. of Carrollton runs power to several seats in an area, then pays the airport a percentage of its sales as an airport concessionaire. D/FW is the first airport to install the machines. The company said it has received inquiries from several other airports.

    D/FW has installed massage chairs that include power outlets in Terminal C and expects to add them in the other four terminals.

    Neptune Networks e-mail kiosks, which debuted at D/FW in 2003, will also add locations later this year.

    D/FW plans to add PowerPort kiosks that allow travelers to lock up their electronics to recharge while they grab a bite.

    The airport is also working to modify a Samsung kiosk near Gate 27 in Terminal C to create eight additional powered workstations.

    Other modifications include opening the all-airline lounge in Terminal D to the public. The club, near Gate 21, sells day passes for a $35 fee and annual memberships for $50.

    D/FW created eight public business centers in 2005, adjoining Starbucks shops and using space created when the airport built its Skylink train. The refuges offer plush leather seating, semi-private workspaces and a lounge-like atmosphere.

    Since 2000, the airport has offered a Laptop Lane location, a pay-for-use mini-business center in Terminal C. Laptop Lane also has locations in other airports around the country.

    Some business travel experts say D/FW's efforts may be on the right track.

    Knowing that an airport is easy to work in is an important factor in deciding where to connect or how early to arrive for a flight, said Carol Devine, who oversees travel procurement for Fort Worth-based Burlington Northern Santa Fe Corp. and is the past president and chairwoman of the National Business Travel Association.

    'Buying decision'

    "It is part of my buying decision," Ms. Devine said, adding that access to power was one of the key reasons she maintains her membership in American Airlines' Admirals Club.

    The ability to get work done at the airport has been a chief focus for American, as the Fort Worth-based airline upgrades and builds new lounges. American is set to open its newest club at Tokyo's Narita International Airport later this month and has said it will be a technology flagship for the carrier.

    The Admirals Club at Terminal D includes power outlets on all tables and beneath bench seating. The carrier also offers power ports at each seat in its premium-class cabins, throughout its MD-80 aircraft and on its two-class 767-300 aircraft.

    All the attention to power outlets can't come soon enough for Mr. Justice, an executive platinum flier on American who books his seat assignments so that he's close to a power port.

    More often, he relies on his arsenal of batteries to avoid being caught without power.

    "I probably spend $200 to $400 a year on batteries," Mr. Justice said.

    That includes two batteries for his cellphone, two for his notebook computer, an external battery for his iPod and a handful of AAA batteries in case either his pager or MP3 player needs extra juice.

    E-mail smarta@dallasnews.com

  20. #520
    Incoherent Rambler grantboston's Avatar
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    If you go to Delta.com and attempt to book DFW-LGA in mid April onward, you'll notice that the flight has been shifted to DFW-JFK.

    Makes sense considering JFK is a Delta hub.

  21. #521
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    Quote Originally Posted by grantboston
    If you go to Delta.com and attempt to book DFW-LGA in mid April onward, you'll notice that the flight has been shifted to DFW-JFK.

    Makes sense considering JFK is a Delta hub.
    I shudder when I contemplate what new, stratospheric level of fare AA will charge on this route once their only non-stop competition is gone.

    Checking tomorrow's flight, we're currently at the mind-boggling price of $1,455 round-trip (the most expensive walk-up fare in the U.S., possibly?).

    Wonder what the new price will be? $1,700... $1,800.

  22. #522
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    Prolly not... since recent stats have shown that DFW isn't the most expensive airport...
    Last edited by interestedobserver; 22 January 2007 at 06:21 PM.

  23. #523
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    At one point I was paying over $2000 to LGA for unrestricted fares. Fun times...

  24. #524
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    Quote Originally Posted by interestedobserver
    Prolly not... since recent stats have shown that DFW isn't the most expensive airport...
    Who's got the honors now?

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    ^cvg

  26. #526
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    Quote Originally Posted by St-T
    ^cvg
    That's what I thought.

    Not to make light of their pain, but one thing important to note about folks in Cincinnati is that, depending on which side of the metro area they live in, they have a choice of four alternative, enitrely unrestricted commerical airports, all of which are located within 100 miles of their city (Louisville, Lexington, Dayton and Indianapolis).
    Last edited by UptownDallas; 23 January 2007 at 02:45 PM.

  27. #527
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    Quote Originally Posted by St-T
    ^cvg
    DFW was #5 or so, IIRC. MSP was up there, and perhaps DET?

  28. #528
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    Quote Originally Posted by interestedobserver
    DFW was #5 or so, IIRC. MSP was up there, and perhaps DET?
    MSP is pretty interesting... similar dilemma to North Texas, a bunch of Northwest airlines fortress hub captives.

    The geographical situation there is similar to DFW. If they don't want to deal with the MSP hub, the nearest legitimate alternative airport is hundreds of miles away.

  29. #529
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    Quote Originally Posted by interestedobserver
    DFW was #5 or so, IIRC. MSP was up there, and perhaps DET?
    I hadn't had time to look this up (no excuse as all it took was a 2-second Google search), but I definitely should have, as I was making things up (or perhaps recalling old stats)! Apologies to all.

    Looks like it's

    1 CVG
    2 SFO
    3 IAD
    4 EWR/DFW (tie)

    With the average round-trip ticket costing $570, Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International (CVG) continues to be the nation's most expensive major airport to fly to or from.

    [...]

    Rounding out the top five most-expensive major airports with average round-trip fares: No. 2, San Francisco International Airport, $494; No. 3, Dulles International Airport in Washington, D.C., $448; No. 4 (tie), Newark International Airport in New Jersey and Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport, $448.

    How they determined EWR and DFW are tied, yet IAD is not despite having the same average round-trip fare is beyond me.

    Source: http://www.usatoday.com/travel/fligh...airfares_x.htm

  30. #530
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    Nada for DFW, yet again. Thanks, AA.


    American Airlines To Serve Rome Year-Round From Chicago And New York


    American Also To Upgrade Chicago-Frankfurt Service To Boeing 777

    FORT WORTH, Texas – American Airlines will upgrade its service between Rome and the United States to year-round beginning April 10. American has previously flown the routes during the summer season only. The airline, a founding member of the global oneworld® Alliance, serves Rome from its Chicago O’Hare hub as well as New York’s JFK International Airport using Boeing 767-300 widebody aircraft.

    During the peak summer season both routes out of Chicago and New York will continue to be flown daily. Beginning Oct. 28, 2007, and continuing through March 31, 2008, the service will be flown four times a week from Chicago and three times per week from New York. Chicago flights will operate Monday, Wednesday, Thursday and Saturday. New York flights will operate Tuesday, Friday and Sunday.

    “We believe there is significant demand for year-round service to Rome,” said Henry Joyner, American’s Senior Vice President – Planning. “We think we’ve found a great way to accomplish this, which not only serves the large markets in Chicago and New York, but also provides superb connecting opportunities throughout our network.”

    American’s Boeing 767-300 aircraft offer 30 seats in the Business Class cabin and 189 seats in the Main cabin. Business Class passengers will soon get to experience American’s Next-Generation Business Class which is being rolled out this year. The Next-Generation Business Class features lie-flat seats with 77 inches of legroom, a personal inflight entertainment system with both video and audio on demand, state-of-the-art cabin lighting and ergonomically-designed overhead bins.

    In addition, American also announced that it will begin flying its daily route between Chicago O’Hare and Frankfurt using its 245-seat Boeing 777 aircraft, effective April 10. The 777 features three-class service – First, Business and Main cabin. The First Class cabin features American’s Flagship Suites. Business Class features comfortable fully-adjustable seating with 60 inches of legroom. The 777 aircraft will also have American’s Next-Generation Business Class installed in the coming months. The larger aircraft also increases American’s cargo capacity between the United States and Frankfurt. American is currently serving the Chicago-Frankfurt market with its Boeing 767-300 aircraft.

  31. #531
    In the O.R. Geaux Tigers's Avatar
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    Damn, that would be sweet to hop on a 777 at DFW and land in Rome. Granted, it will never happen, but it would still be sweet.
    By the power of greyskull!

  32. #532
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    Remember AA's old ad campaign. Based here, best here. They should have a new one for us. Based here, best in Chicago.....or something like that. Seems more fitting.

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    Based here, Best in Chicago--16 daily flights--have fun connecting.

  34. #534
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    "American-We know why you fly...to connect in Chicago"
    By the power of greyskull!

  35. #535
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    I don't know what some of you expect. AA doesn't simply add service to DFW because it's their home airport. It generally puts aircraft on routes that are economically viable or better utilized than they would be elsewhere.

    The only two things we have to blame here are the demographics and geographic position of the Metroplex.

    Instead of whining on this board, we'd be better served by booking tickets to Italy so AA sees the demand for direct DFW-Rome flights.

  36. #536
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    Quote Originally Posted by interestedobserver

    Instead of whining on this board, we'd be better served by booking tickets to Italy so AA sees the demand for direct DFW-Rome flights.
    I think we are just having some fun.

  37. #537
    The Urban Pragmatist Mballar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by interestedobserver
    I don't know what some of you expect. AA doesn't simply add service to DFW because it's their home airport. It generally puts aircraft on routes that are economically viable or better utilized than they would be elsewhere.
    So, AA should stop freaking throwing a hissy fit when other airlines (namely Southwest) want to add more service to the area. Surely, AA doesn't think that DFW residents/travelers will sit idly by while AA dictates to us how many travel options we can have, based upon whether AA thinks our market is "economically viable" enough to add more service.
    A wise man speaks because he has something to say; a fool because he has to say something. - Plato

  38. #538
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    AA will 'throw a hissy fit' whenever it feels its bottom line is threatened. As will any other airline/business (to what degree or how is open to interpretation and certainly better fit for another thread).

    AA, like Southwest, cares about keeping its investors happy first and foremost. Warm feelings from Luv and Red, White & Blue eagles that some in the Metroplex might get from said businesses are nice, but merely side effects.

  39. #539
    The Urban Pragmatist Mballar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by interestedobserver
    AA will 'throw a hissy fit' whenever it feels its bottom line is threatened. As will any other airline/business (to what degree or how is open to interpretation and certainly better fit for another thread).
    I understand that part, as I've stated it in another thread. However, my point was there will come a time when AA's "hissy fits" won't work for AA anymore.
    A wise man speaks because he has something to say; a fool because he has to say something. - Plato

  40. #540
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mballar
    I understand that part, as I've stated it in another thread. However, my point was there will come a time when AA's "hissy fits" won't work for AA anymore.
    Fair enough... just not seeing how that relates to AA flying to Rome. Seems to be just a way to get a jab in at DFW Urban Forum's favorite AAirline to hate.

  41. #541
    High-Rise Member TexasPlus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by interestedobserver
    Fair enough... just not seeing how that relates to AA flying to Rome. Seems to be just a way to get a jab in at DFW Urban Forum's favorite AAirline to hate.
    Hate or Respect are EARNED responses.
    "Liberalism: Moochers Electing Looters to Steal from Producers."

  42. #542
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    Quote Originally Posted by interestedobserver
    AA will 'throw a hissy fit' whenever it feels its bottom line is threatened. As will any other airline/business (to what degree or how is open to interpretation and certainly better fit for another thread).

    AA, like Southwest, cares about keeping its investors happy first and foremost. Warm feelings from Luv and Red, White & Blue eagles that some in the Metroplex might get from said businesses are nice, but merely side effects.
    I interpret the phrase "hissy fit," to read "massive deployment of lobbyists, pubicists and capital in an influence to exert extraordinary levels of pressure on elected officials and other public sector employees."

    On that count, AA has consistently outspent all other air carriers (both legacy and LCCs) by a large amount.

    If AA were to focus more on delivering a quality product at a reasonable price and less on trying to influence politicians (disrupting the obligation of elected officials to represent their own constituents in the process) and deceiving the public, it might find a better reception on this board.

  43. #543
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    Quote Originally Posted by interestedobserver
    I don't know what some of you expect. AA doesn't simply add service to DFW because it's their home airport. It generally puts aircraft on routes that are economically viable or better utilized than they would be elsewhere.

    The only two things we have to blame here are the demographics and geographic position of the Metroplex.
    I just know for me personally, it's just hard to sit back and watch an airline like Delta add more and more routes out of it's home hub in Atlanta and then watch AA add more and more routes out of any other airport but it's home at DFW. Chicago gets a new AA route to Peking. Chicago gets a new route to Mumbai. Chicago gets a new route to Rome. Boston gets a new route to Shannon, Ireland. JFK gets a new route to Rome. Miami gets an extra route to Heathrow. Etc, etc, etc. DFW gets a new route to Topeka. Excuse me if I don't turn cartwheels in my living room.

    I understand that geography plays a role when adding routes and Chicago's location simply makes more sense on most international routes than DFW. It's just frustrating. But, then again, Delta is on the brink of bankrupcy and AA is turning a profit.
    By the power of greyskull!

  44. #544
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    Quote Originally Posted by Geaux Tigers
    I just know for me personally, it's just hard to sit back and watch an airline like Delta add more and more routes out of it's home hub in Atlanta and then watch AA add more and more routes out of any other airport but it's home at DFW. Chicago gets a new AA route to Peking. Chicago gets a new route to Mumbai. Chicago gets a new route to Rome. Boston gets a new route to Shannon, Ireland. JFK gets a new route to Rome. Miami gets an extra route to Heathrow. Etc, etc, etc. DFW gets a new route to Topeka. Excuse me if I don't turn cartwheels in my living room.

    I understand that geography plays a role when adding routes and Chicago's location simply makes more sense on most international routes than DFW. It's just frustrating. But, then again, Delta is on the brink of bankrupcy and AA is turning a profit.
    Hell, why not look closer to home... just down the road in Houston.

    Continental has been expanding their international presence their like crazy... adding all sorts of great destinations. Moreover, the Houston Airport System appears to do a much better job of attracting service from a wide variety of foreign flag carriers without intereference from Continental.

  45. #545
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    Quote Originally Posted by Geaux Tigers
    I understand that geography plays a role when adding routes and Chicago's location simply makes more sense on most international routes than DFW. It's just frustrating. But, then again, Delta is on the brink of bankrupcy and AA is turning a profit.
    Exactly. It might be frustrating, but there's not much you can do aside from MOVE to a city that has a better geographic/demographic position for catching more non-stop international flights.

    We've got a slew of flights to South America that Chicago doesn't have. We've also got double-dailies to Japan. There are some things that DFW is well-positioned for. But there are many things that it is not. 'Lesser' European destinations will virtually always go to more Northern/Eastern hubs where AA can pick up more logical, in-path connections.

    AA is also very conservative when it comes to new routes, more so than most other airlines.

    You mentioned Chicago getting a China flight. Well, if you recall, AA wanted to fly non-stop from DFW to Beijing (Chicago's got Shanghai) but the pilots scuttled that proposition.

    Assuming AA gets Boeing 787s down the road, I'd expect DFW to see some new international non-stops open up as they become more economically feasible on the smaller aircraft.

  46. #546
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    Quote Originally Posted by UptownDallas
    Hell, why not look closer to home... just down the road in Houston.

    Continental has been expanding their international presence their like crazy... adding all sorts of great destinations. Moreover, the Houston Airport System appears to do a much better job of attracting service from a wide variety of foreign flag carriers without intereference from Continental.
    Houston also has a much greater international draw thanks to the Texas Medical Center, the oil business, a collection of foreign consulates, and a large foreign-born and/or internationally-tied population. Dallas just can't compete in the demand department. Houston's got the O&D passengers which pay more and for whom airlines go first.

  47. #547
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    D/FW tweaks incentives to draw new carriers

    08:16 AM CST on Wednesday, January 31, 2007
    By SUZANNE MARTA / The Dallas Morning News
    E-mail smarta@dallasnews.com

    Officials at Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport want more flexibility when it comes to luring carriers to launch new service from the world's third-busiest airport.

    The board is expected to approve a change to its air service incentive program Thursday that would allow airport officials to offer prorated incentives to carriers whose new international service doesn't meet the guidelines outlined when the program was launched two years ago.

    Under the revised program, carriers would not have to offer an international route for the full 12 to 18 months required, depending on type of aircraft, and would not have to maintain minimum weekly frequencies to be eligible for a lesser financial incentive that is proportionate to the service being offered.

    "There are some opportunities that we're chasing right now that this would let us close," said Joe Lopano, D/FW's executive vice president of marketing and terminal management.

    Mr. Lopano declined to say which carriers those opportunities might include, except to say the routes would be to Mexico.

    The air service incentive program was launched in January 2005 as a way to appeal to carriers as the airport looked to fill gates vacated by Delta Air Lines Inc. and overcome what officials said was reluctance to consider D/FW Airport while the Wright amendment restrictions at Dallas Love Field were being debated.

    The program combines marketing assistance of up to $200,000 and more than a year of rebates on landing fees for domestic, international and cargo services, depending on aircraft type.

  48. #548
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    No Virgin Air for DFW

    Virgin America names first six destinations
    Even though it's still fighting to win federal approval to fly as a U.S. carrier, California-based start-up Virgin America has announced what it hopes will be its first six destinations. As it has already said in the past, the carrier plans to make San Francisco-New York JFK its inaugural route. In addition to those cities, Virgin America says it also plans to fly to Washington Dulles, Los Angeles, San Diego and Las Vegas within its first nine months, "pending … certification by the U.S. Department of Transportation." Virgin America did not announce exactly which routes it would fly from those airports.

    In other news from Virgin America, the airline announced Tuesday that it named Samuel Skinner as vice chairman of its board of directors. Skinner is a former Secretary of Transportation and served as the White House Chief of Staff under President George H.W. Bush, a move that the carrier no doubt helps ease DOT concerns that it is operating as an American-based carrier –- and out of the influence of British entrepreneur Richard Branson and his Virgin brand. “We are thrilled to have Secretary Skinner join our Board as we continue to demonstrate our compliance with the Department’s citizenship requirements," Virgin America CEO Fred Reid says in a press release. "Sam brings a depth of knowledge and experience in transportation, and a well known, sterling reputation for independence, integrity, and U.S. leadership in aviation issues."

  49. #549
    The Urban Pragmatist Mballar's Avatar
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    DFW Airport and its incentive program reminds me of an old Eddie Murphy joke. . .something about "your sister being so ugly that you have to tie a pork chop around her neck just so the dog will play with her." The fortress hub that the airport board has allowed AA to create has created an "ugly" situation. Now, no airline that isn't already there wants to come and rent those empty gates (play) unless the airport board significantly enhances its incentive program (the pork chop). When I think of the title of this thread, and actual reality at the airport, it's almost laughable. 3 1/2 years after the start of this thread, what has/is DFW Airport's Board really doing to become "the premiere airport in the global marketplace?"
    Last edited by Mballar; 31 January 2007 at 06:51 PM.
    A wise man speaks because he has something to say; a fool because he has to say something. - Plato

  50. #550
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    Quote Originally Posted by PuddinHead
    Just think we had an opportunity to resolve the competition issue at DFW and actually remove the stranglehold on DFW.
    Yes but that "Johnny come lately" AAirline refused to move back to New York City.
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