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Thread: DFW wants to be the premier airport in the global marketplace

  1. #451
    In the O.R. Geaux Tigers's Avatar
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    I was on an AA flight in first class recently where I got the hot towel treatment. I can't remember if I was going to Tampa or San Antonio, but it was nice.
    By the power of greyskull!

  2. #452
    High-Rise Member TexasPlus's Avatar
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    Delay Could Wreck Open Skies Deal

    Forbes.com

    International
    Delay Could Wreck Open Skies Deal
    Oxford Analytica 09.22.06, 6:00 AM ET

    The European Union's Council of Ministers will be asked next month to ratify the U.S.-EU Open Skies Air Services Agreement. The two sides reached a tentative agreement in November 2005. However, opposition in the United States has led Congress to cut key provisions and could prevent EU ratification.

    Following the 2002 ruling by the European Court of Justice outlawing all existing bilateral air services agreements with the United States, the European Commission has been seeking a comprehensive regime to meet the court's demands. A tentative agreement was reached in November:

    --The EU wanted to open the U.S. market by winning so-called "cabotage" rights, the ability to operate inside the U.S. market with no restrictions. Failing this, the EU wanted the United States to drop its strict foreign ownership requirements. The EU airline industry would also benefit from an end to national designation of air routes limiting access to named national carriers.

    --U.S. supporters of Open Skies wanted to gain better access to key European airports and were also keen to see overseas capital invested in an ailing U.S. airline sector. The U.S. administration rejected the EU's demands for cabotage and only made a limited offer on foreign ownership liberalization of U.S. airlines.

    On the European side, airlines that stood to gain from the agreement welcomed the accord. However, others were less enthusiastic:

    --Virgin Atlantic Airways has called the ownership offer a transparent device to fool the EU into agreeing to an unbalanced deal.

    --British Airways in particular was disappointed with the agreement. However, BA has expressed interest in forging closer links with its alliance partner, American Airlines, a subsidiary of AMR, but only if it has more influence over strategy and operations.

    --Aer Lingus Group wants to build up Dublin as a transatlantic hub. Widening its long-haul network is its best hope of boosting the value of its planned floatation.

    --The British Airports Authority was badly hit by last month's security clampdown. BAA fears that with an Open Skies agreement, it could not cope with demand.

    While the tentative agreement was regarded as a relatively modest proposal, its U.S. supporters felt that it would signal a new direction for international air transport and would challenge government subsidies.

    U.S. critics of the deal include a coalition of airlines and labor unions, with the active support of several key congressmen. Opponents of the agreement contend that it will have deleterious consequences for U.S. safety and security, as well as the economic and strategic effects of diluting U.S. sovereign control over domestic airlines.

    Egged on by opponents, Congress has vetoed changes to foreign ownership provisions. In this context, the Department of Transportation has delayed its plans to loosen foreign ownership rules.

    This delay threatens the whole Open Skies agreement, since European negotiators have made it clear that the ownership rule is a prerequisite to signing the deal. However, the Department of Transportation remains hopeful that a final Open Skies agreement with Europe can be struck toward the end of this year.

    EU Transport Commissioner Jacques Barrot is also optimistic that the EU's Council of Ministers will ratify the Open Skies agreement next month despite the U.S. administration's stance on airline ownership. The commission was surprisingly unwilling to press the United States on cabotage.

    Failure to confirm the Open Skies agreement would be highly damaging to the transatlantic air transport market and would also delay a much-needed rationalization of the EU airline industry. However, the most likely outcome is that the council will ratify the existing agreement next month and hope to secure more concessions at a later date.

    To read an extended version of this article, log on to Oxford Analytica's Web site.

    Oxford Analytica is an independent strategic-consulting firm drawing on a network of more than 1,000 scholar experts at Oxford and other leading universities and research institutions around the world. For more information, please visit www.oxan.com. To find out how to subscribe to the firm's Daily Brief Service, click here.

    http://www.forbes.com/2006/09/21/ope...ord_print.html

    __________________________________________________

    US protectionism. While the tentative agreement was regarded as a relatively modest proposal, its US supporters felt that it would signal a new direction for international air transport and would challenge government subsidies -- such as UK government protection of BA's position at Heathrow. The proposals received strong support from American Airlines, Delta and Hawaiian Airlines, as well as Boeing and several US airports.

    The US critics of the deal comprise a coalition of airlines and labour unions, with the active support of several key Congressmen. Continental Airlines was particularly exercised by the agreement, threatening legal action to block it. Opponents to the agreement contend that it will have deleterious consequences for US safety and security, as well as the economic and strategic effects of diluting US sovereign control over domestic airlines (see UNITED STATES: Congress considers trade restrictions - March 22, 2006). The unions were especially suspicious that loss of control would further weaken of their collective bargaining power.

    Egged on by opponents to the agreement, Congress has vetoed changes to foreign ownership provisions, refusing to dilute the 25% cap on foreign ownership. Protectionist sentiment has been fuelled by the fallout from the Dubai/P&O ports affair (see UNITED STATES: Ports row reveals Republican divisions - March 6, 2006). In this context, the Department of Transport (DoT) has delayed its plans to loosen foreign ownership rules, in order to give itself more time to win congressional support.

    Outlook. This delay threatens the whole Open Skies agreement, since European negotiators have made it clear that the ownership rule is a prerequisite to signing the open-skies deal. However, the DoT remains hopeful that a final Open Skies agreement with Europe can be struck towards the end of this year.

    http://www.oxan.com/display.aspx?ItemID=DB129175
    "Liberalism: Moochers Electing Looters to Steal from Producers."

  3. #453
    Administrator dfwcre8tive's Avatar
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    Airport gets higher-than-expected bonus in gas deal
    11:17 PM CDT on Friday, October 6, 2006
    By ELIZABETH SOUDER / The Dallas Morning News

    Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport said Friday it got a check for $185 million as it completed a deal to allow Chesapeake Energy Corp. drill for natural gas on airport property. That's $4 million more than the airport had expected when it first announced the bid in August.

    Industry observers say the deal was one of the sweetest ever signed in the North Texas Barnett Shale natural gas field and all the more so because Chesapeake was the only company that bid.

    Insiders said Chesapeake had made it clear that it would bid aggressively. Plus, the airport set very specific standards on drilling and pipelines, and on partnerships with women- and minority-owned businesses, that made the deal less attractive for some players. "The terms in the lease agreement are pretty onerous. It's thick as a phone book," said John Pinkerton, chief executive of Range Resources, which had considered bidding on the deal.

    That didn't stop Chesapeake, an independent Oklahoma City oil and gas producer. "The D/FW lease itself represents a significant opportunity to explore one of the largest remaining contiguous prospective areas in the natural gas rich Barnett Shale," Chesapeake chief executive Aubrey McClendon said in a press release Friday.

    Chesapeake will also give the airport royalty payments worth 25 percent of the value of the natural gas the company produces on the airport's 18,000 acres. That's in addition to the $185 million bonus payment, which is about a third of the size of the airport's entire annual budget.

    D/FW said Friday that Chesapeake also agreed in the natural gas lease to allow firms owned by women and minorities to invest in the project. Such firms would own more than 20 percent of the drilling project.

    Also, Chesapeake agreed that 39 percent of the subcontract work would be performed by businesses owned by minorities or women. Several industry insiders said rules about women- and minority-owned business partnerships made the deal more difficult.

    "It's kind of like a marriage. ... You're in the oil and gas industry, prices go up and prices go down, you need a partner you can live with for 25 years," said Range Resource's Mr. Pinkerton.

    Others shied away

    The airport published a list in March of 10 potential bidders, including big Barnett Shale producers Devon Energy Corp. and XTO Energy.

    Other companies on the list: Shell Exploration & Production, Encore Acquisition Co., EnCana Oil & Gas, Harding Co. (which has a partnership with Exxon Mobil Corp.), Williams Production Gulf Coast LP, and Chief Oil & Gas, which was recently bought by Devon.

    Officials with Devon and Encore said the deal wasn't right for them, but declined to say why. Shell declined to comment.

    Too risky

    "It's not a proven area," said Mr. Pinkerton of Range. Few wells have been drilled in that particular corner of the Barnett Shale play.

    He estimated the deal would require about $500 million in investment. "If the project works, it's going to be a very good project for Chesapeake. The question is, will it work?" he said.

    Further, word got around that Chesapeake would bid aggressively, according to Mr. Pinkerton and other industry insiders. "I commend the airport. Their timing was impeccable. With gas prices down, I doubt, if they rebid that thing, they would get that again," he said.

    E-mail esouder@dallasnews.com

  4. #454
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    Quote Originally Posted by njjeppson
    Airport gets higher-than-expected bonus in gas deal
    11:17 PM CDT on Friday, October 6, 2006
    By ELIZABETH SOUDER / The Dallas Morning News

    Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport said Friday it got a check for $185 million as it completed a deal to allow Chesapeake Energy Corp. drill for natural gas on airport property. That's $4 million more than the airport had expected when it first announced the bid in August.
    Any updates on what the Airport Board intends to do with the windfall? Last I heard, American Airlines was lobbying hard to get the Board to simply give AA the money to prop up its balance sheet (via a reduction in landing fees).

    Such an action would be bewildering, to say the least.

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    ^Don't laugh, it could happen. Nothing about AA would surprise anyone.

  6. #456
    Administrator tamtagon's Avatar
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    I guess lower landing fees would help attract additional carriers??

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    Quote Originally Posted by tamtagon
    I guess lower landing fees would help attract additional carriers??
    Maybe... yet the DFW Airport Board claims in a presentation they made to Dallas City Council last month that DFW landing fees are already among the lowest of any major airport in the U.S. They have also (according to the same presentation) already reduced landing fees by 9.9%.

    In addition, American Airlines also appears to be behind a separate initiative to slap an 8% gross revenues tax on all off-airport parking operators (this would be one of the highest taxes of its type in the nation) and to further increase on-airport parking rates by $1.00 per day-- the stated objective of this initiative is to also reduce landing fees.

    http://www.dallascityhall.com/counci...DFW_Budget.pdf

  8. #458
    Incoherent Rambler grantboston's Avatar
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    Pay down bond debt from building Terminal D and Skylink! Upgrade terminals!

    Landing fees aren't the problem, but could be gradually reduced with paying down the billions in debt used to fund the latest renovations. Passengers would benefit from nicer facilities. DFW is falling behind other megahubs in terms of passenger ammenities.

  9. #459
    Administrator tamtagon's Avatar
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    Use the bonus money to pay for the DART interface with the people mover, additionally extend the people mover to the Centerpoint TRE station. The airport is public property, and the public should directly benefit. If Chesapeake Energy Corp. strikes gas, the airport's annual cut should be applied to airport operating expenses.

  10. #460
    In the O.R. Geaux Tigers's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tamtagon
    Use the bonus money to pay for the DART interface with the people mover, additionally extend the people mover to the Centerpoint TRE station.
    Great idea but the Skylink trains are behind security.
    By the power of greyskull!

  11. #461
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    Quote Originally Posted by grantboston
    DFW is falling behind other megahubs in terms of passenger ammenities.
    In my mind, the only thing they are behind on is selection of different carriers.

  12. #462
    Incoherent Rambler grantboston's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FoUTASportscaster
    In my mind, the only thing they are behind on is selection of different carriers.
    Really? Which carriers could they add?

  13. #463
    Administrator tamtagon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Geaux Tigers
    Great idea but the Skylink trains are behind security.
    The Centerpoint TRE-DFW Skylink interface incorporates airport security. I have no idea how the Centerpoint train station is configured, but with the $180+ million bonus, DFW should be able to afford a remote passenger/luggage checkpoint and employee entry, as well as a secure route from Centerpoint to airport terminals.

    This time around, the North Texas public's share of the mineral wealth of Texas must go toward improving the quality of life through transportation options which reduce air pollution and highway congestion from personal vehicular trips to/from the airport.

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    Quote Originally Posted by grantboston
    Really? Which carriers could they add?
    Allegiant Air (serves 43 destinations), JetBlue (serves 47 destinations), Spirit (serves 29 destinations), USA3000 (20 destinations), WestJet (34 destinations), Aviacsa (Mexican airline with 26 destinations serving Houston), Aeromexico (Mexican airline with 40 destinations including several major U.S. cities)

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    Quote Originally Posted by tamtagon
    The Centerpoint TRE-DFW Skylink interface incorporates airport security. I have no idea how the Centerpoint train station is configured, but with the $180+ million bonus, DFW should be able to afford a remote passenger/luggage checkpoint and employee entry, as well as a secure route from Centerpoint to airport terminals.

    This time around, the North Texas public's share of the mineral wealth of Texas must go toward improving the quality of life through transportation options which reduce air pollution and highway congestion from personal vehicular trips to/from the airport.
    I can't figure out why (other than money), the skylink does not continue south to the Car Rental facility? which would also start a southern line towards the TRE.

    Its a whip to wait for the shuttle that picks up for the rentals.

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    ^Probably because most people go to baggage claim after they get off their plane and then you can't get back in to access skylink.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mrowl
    I can't figure out why (other than money), the skylink does not continue south to the Car Rental facility? which would also start a southern line towards the TRE.

    Its a whip to wait for the shuttle that picks up for the rentals.
    The primary purpose of the Skylink is to facilitate connections for American Airlines passengers transiting DFW. Running Skylink to the rental car facility would have run up project costs (which are primarily borne by American Airlines) without generating any additional passenger traffic.

  18. #468
    Incoherent Rambler grantboston's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by UptownDallas
    Allegiant Air (serves 43 destinations), JetBlue (serves 47 destinations), Spirit (serves 29 destinations), USA3000 (20 destinations), WestJet (34 destinations), Aviacsa (Mexican airline with 26 destinations serving Houston), Aeromexico (Mexican airline with 40 destinations including several major U.S. cities)
    Ok, let's take these one by one:

    Allegiant: Serves destinations with little or no air service to major vacation areas. DFW does not fit their business model. Not by a long shot. This geographic area is simply too big.

    jetBlue: I'd love to see their service at DFW, too. But we're told by some on here that they only want to serve DAL. I hope that isn't the case.

    Spirit: Going through the motions of changing out their entire fleet and is therefore short on planes. They still have a gate ans signs at DFW. I would expect them to be back. Also, I feel like they could add a flight to Detroit since they seem to be building a hub there. Of course, DFW has service on AA and Northwest to Detroit already, too.

    USA3000: Serves major NORTHEAST cities in flights to vacation areas. Last I checked Dallas is not in the Northeast. (And thankfully so )

    Westjet: This one is something that is unaffected by the entire Wright debate since there would be international flights involved. As luck would have it, they're in talks to join the OneWorld alliance of which AA is a founding member. So, that big-bad villain AA might draw Westjet service because they might want all the feeding traffic AA could provide. You know, hubs and such.

    Aviasca: Another airline that is based in Monterrey, Mexico that is entirely unrealted to the Wright-related hand-wringing. They're also short on planes because they're undergoing a fleet renewal. I would like to see them here, too, but their presence would be undeniably small. One 737 to Mexico each day isn't a whole lot.

    Aeromexico: Skyteam member that left once their Skyteam partner (Delta) left town with its hub in hand. The airline has no feed from other cities because they don't codeshare with AA. Mexicana, on the other hand, could quite possibly join OneWorld and increase its presence here. Again, this is another airline that exists entirely outside the scope of the Wright-related hand-wringing.

    While I would love to have every international airline in the world at DFW, we all know that isn't possible. The strength of the Dallas international air travel market will depend on the business climate and on those who live or vacation in Mexican cities. This will unfold over time and has little to do with DFW itself, but rather what airline calls this place its hub.

    As for the domestic airlines you mentioned, with the exception of jetBlue (who FoUTA seems passionate about having at DAL) they're not going to fly here because Dallas isn't the type of city they serve.

  19. #469
    Administrator dfwcre8tive's Avatar
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    D/FW breaks ground on $66.7 million taxiway system
    03:59 PM CDT on Tuesday, October 10, 2006
    By SUZANNE MARTA / The Dallas Morning News

    For passengers at Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport, taking the scenic route could mean getting to the gate faster. The airport began construction today on a $66.7 million taxiway system that runs along the perimeter of D/FW busiest runways.

    Once the 18-month construction project is complete, air traffic controllers will be able to direct pilots to taxi around the runways rather than wait until its clear to cross in the middle. This project is just another step toward efficiency and safety for the flying public, said Ava Wilkerson, a regional director for the Federal Aviation Administration.

    On a given day, aircraft landing at D/FW navigate across active runways more than 1,600 times while departing flights wait.

    Even if it's clear, it can take between 40 seconds and a minute for each aircraft just to get the necessary approvals and drive across. During the busiest times of the day, the carefully choreographed dance between arriving and departing flights leaves aircraft and passengers in a holding pattern.

    D/FW, in coordination with FAA and NASA Ames FutureFlight Central, has been studying the project since the early 1990s, starting with a simple drawing on a napkin.

    NASA used a special simulator to get a clearer picture of how the new taxiway system would work in 2003, and the FAA, which is paying for 75 percent of the project, gave its approvals last year.

    Airport officials estimate the project will increase D/FWs capacity by 30 percent and put off the need to build an eighth runway.

    E-mail smarta@dallasnews.com

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    Last edited by dfwcre8tive; 10 October 2006 at 08:17 PM.

  20. #470
    Land and hold short Route Pack Six's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by njjeppson
    For passengers at Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport, taking the scenic route could mean getting to the gate faster. The airport began construction today on a $66.7 million taxiway system that runs along the perimeter of D/FW busiest runways.
    The image is too light on the DFW website so I adjusted the brightness and contrast so you can see where the perimeter taxiways will be:



    I put a star in the southeast side where Founders' Plaza is located (the local spotting spot).

  21. #471
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    What a surprise... the DFW Airport Board buys off local politicians and friends...

    ...where's the Dallas Managed News on this story? Did they even bother reporting the Dallas City Council action (which apparently approved this deal earlier this month).

    An earlier article stated that American Airlines was behind the move... 84% of the proceeds will be used to defray AA's operating costs.

    As I recall, the Star-Telegram previously reported that this would be one of the highest parking taxes of its sort in the country.

    Fee vote could put officials on spot
    By Dave Lieber
    Star-Telegram Staff Writer


    Fort Worth City Council members are scheduled to vote Tuesday on a proposal that could raise costs for Dallas/Fort Worth Airport passengers who park in off-site lots.

    Airport officials want to charge parking lot operators a new fee; the operators say they will pass the cost on to their customers.

    Yet most of the council members who'll make the decision aren't likely to be affected by new fees.

    They already park for free at the airport.

    Free parking is offered to dozens of public officials in the region as part of the airport's little-known Courtesy Parking Program.

    Airport records provided to The Watchdog under the Texas Public Information Act show that the airport has given away about $125,000 worth of free parking this year to those lucky enough to be in the program.

    The program is offered to members of local city councils, mayors, airport board members, federal and state lawmakers, business leaders and some Chamber of Commerce leaders. A brochure explains that the program shows "appreciation for the voluntary service and support" given to the airport.

    The Watchdog compiled a list of well-known public officials who have parked for free this year. At the top are U.S. Rep. Michael Burgess, R-Lewisville, who got $2,232 worth of free parking; state Rep. Charlie Geren, R-Fort Worth, $2,054; state Rep. Fred Hill, R-Richardson, $1,576; U.S. Rep. Jeb Hensarling, R-Dallas, $1,506; and state Rep. Bob Griggs, R-North Richland Hills, $1,105.

    Members of the program display stickers on their car window, and their license plates are noted in the airport's computer system. When a car's license plate number matches, it is waved through the airport gates without the driver having to pay.

    Here are the values of the parking that Fort Worth council members got:

    Donavan Wheatfall, $335

    Wendy Davis, $296

    Carter Burdette, $181

    Sal Espino, $97

    Jungus Jordan, $59

    Mayor Pro Tem Kathleen Hicks, $11

    Mayor Mike Moncrief, $9

    New Councilman Danny Scarth is not enrolled in the program. Nor is Councilman Chuck Silcox, who says he hardly used the privilege when he had it.

    The Dallas City Council approved the change in airport regulations this month. Some Dallas council members also use the free-parking program.

    Last week, the Watchdog contacted all Fort Worth council members by e-mail and phone for comment. Only Wheatfall and Silcox responded.

    Wheatfall said that if the council approved the fee, it would not be raising costs for consumers, since the lot operators would make that decision.

    "If that business decides to pass on the increase to its customers because they want a higher profit margin, then we can't be held accountable for that," Wheatfall said.

    Business owners say they have no choice but to do so.

    "I don't think there's a parking company at the airport that can absorb that and stay in business," Kenneth E. Kundmueller, president of FreedomPark Airport Valet Services, said of the proposed increase. "The margins in the business aren't enough to absorb that."

    Airport officials say the fee is fair because it gives the businesses the right to operate at the airport. The new fee would replace smaller fees now paid by those businesses.

    Mark Wildman, vice president of The Parking Spot, said he and others in the company were "pretty stunned" to learn from The Watchdog that some council members who will vote on the proposal receive free parking.

    "When you look at who is voting to approve the gross-receipts fee, it just doesn't seem right," Wildman said.

    Currently, off-site parking companies pay the airport $290 for an annual permit, $10 per shuttle vehicle and $1.25 per trip per vehicle.

    Airport spokesman Ken Capps said: "I think you are making a leap to say that the courtesy parking program influences how council votes. There is nothing expected. It's really what it is. It's a courtesy. To say otherwise is unfair."

    Capps said the program has been around for 30 years and is common at airports nationwide. He said that no taxpayer funds are involved and that some business leaders and airport board members also get the privilege.

    San Francisco International Airport has a similar program for public officials, but it was scaled back this year because of "some abuse," airport spokesman Mike McCarron told me. Officials now can park for free only when traveling for government-related trips.

    D/FW's program has no similar restrictions.

    State Rep. Kent Grusendorf, R-Arlington, who used $424 worth of parking this year, said: "It's one of the perks. With a salary of $600 a month, I don't feel bashful taking it. One thing they give you is free parking."

    Geren said: "I think it's a courtesy they extend to us. We do a lot of work for them."

    Former Fort Worth Councilwoman Becky Haskin, who left office in May but whose sticker has not yet expired, accepted $489 worth of parking. She told me, "It's the only perk you get."

    Grapevine Councilwoman Clydene Johnson, who got $120 worth of parking this year, said she used it more for her insurance business than for city business.

    She votes on airport issues, but when asked whether there was a conflict of interest, she answered: "I don't think I'm influenced by dollars in any way. It's not enough, certainly, to influence me."

    Former Fort Worth Councilman Jim Lane used $383 worth of free parking when he went on an overseas vacation in late July. He left office 17 months ago. "Maybe that's a little extra perk they gave," he said.

    Former Fort Worth Councilman Clyde Picht, who used $86 worth of free parking this year, said that if he were voting Tuesday on the airport's proposal, his free parking pass would not "have occurred to me" as a potential conflict.

    "I didn't even know they racked up a value to that parking," he said. "If I were voting on that, I would probably vote against it just because it's another tax. We don't need any more taxes."

    Wheatfall said, "If the citizens think there is a problem that we have a conflict of interest because we have courtesy parking, I would gladly give up courtesy parking. It's just a convenience when we fly out, especially on city business."

    Final note: I'm hosting a Veterans Day homecoming party from 2 to 4 p.m. next Sunday at the Colleyville Center, 5301 Riverwalk Drive. Admission is free, and all veterans and their families are invited.

    Free parking

    The Watchdog called more than 40 public officials who receive free parking at D/FW Airport. One officeholder disputed the charges. A spokeswoman for U.S. Rep. Henry Bonilla, R-San Antonio, questioned the $447 in free parking services listed under his name in airport records. Bonilla's spokeswoman, Brittany Eck, said Bonilla was not at D/FW on the 2006 dates shown in airport records.

    It turns out that the vehicle using the free parking privilege under Bonilla's name belongs to a Dallas fundraiser. She worked for Bonilla's campaign last year, but she no longer does. The sticker on her car has not yet expired. Eck said, "We requested that the unauthorized charges be reimbursed and also requested that the airport discontinue authorization in the congressman's name." Contacted by The Watchdog, the fundraiser said, "It's an adhesive sticker. So there's not a way to take it on and off. I'm glad to reimburse or do whatever."

    -- Dave Lieber

    Free parking at D/FW Airport

    Some public officials with ties to Tarrant County who have gotten more than $300 in free parking at D/FW Airport this year.


    Name Title Free parking value*
    Michael Burgess U.S. representative-Lewisville $2,232
    Charlie Geren State representative-Fort Worth $2,054
    Bob Griggs State representative-North Richland Hills $1,105
    Glen Whitley Tarrant County commissioner $722
    Robert Cluck Arlington mayor $699
    Jane Nelson State senator-Lewisville $674
    Glenn Porterfied Euless councilman $577
    Darlene Freed Grapevine councilwoman $516
    Lon Burnam State representative-Fort Worth $513
    Carl Tyson Euless City councilman $513
    Joe Barton U.S. representative $513
    Roy Brooks Tarrant County commissioner $454
    Kent Grusendorf State representative-Arlington $424
    Donavan Wheatfall Fort Worth councilman $335
    Vicki Truitt State representative-Keller $350
    Pete Sessions U.S.representative-Dallas $334
    Kim Brimer State senator-Fort Worth $312

  22. #472
    In the O.R. Geaux Tigers's Avatar
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    Posted on Fri, Nov. 03, 2006



    Projected bumpy ride ends in unexpectedly happy landing

    By DAVID WETHE
    STAR-TELEGRAM STAFF WRITER


    D/FW AIRPORT - Think you've got problems staying afloat? Try balancing the checkbook for the world's third-busiest airport.

    Dallas/Fort Worth Airport reported Thursday that 60.3 million passengers came through the airport over the past fiscal year, just shy of its record 61.1 million travelers in 2000. The airport did see record numbers this fiscal year, which ended Sept. 30, for international fliers, passengers on low-cost airlines and travelers on American Airlines.

    But even with all of those superlatives, Chris Poinsatte, D/FW's chief financial officer, relied on a little financial wizardry to eke out a $5 million surplus that will be distributed to the airlines next month. The airport is not allowed to keep any gains it makes in a year.

    Soon after starting the 2006 fiscal year, D/FW was projecting a $35 million shortfall.

    That was caused by two factors. American Airlines' move into the new Terminal D was delayed more than three months. The Fort Worth-based carrier also shifted many of its flights to Dallas Love Field to compete with rival Southwest Airlines after recent changes to the Wright Amendment. At that time, in November, Missouri became the ninth state to be exempted from the 1979 federal law that allows nonstop flights to go from Dallas only to short-haul destinations.

    Poinsatte's calculations were based on an 8 percent reduction in American flights.

    He also expected the number of passengers to drop at a similar rate.

    That was anything but the case.

    To combat rising fuel prices this summer, airlines across the country have been squeezing more passengers into fewer planes. D/FW actually made $7 million more than expected off various passenger-related categories such as parking, rental cars and the new Grand Hyatt hotel. The bulk of that money, about $3 million, came from more people renting cars that were priced higher than in previous years.

    The airport's Grand Hyatt hotel, with its average 69 percent occupancy and $183 room rate, also did better than expected for the year.

    "I am extremely pleased with the performance of the Hyatt financially," said Ken Buchanan, the airport's executive vice president of revenue management.

    But there was also plenty of belt-tightening over the past 12 months.

    Poinsatte refinanced D/FW's $2.7 billion debt to save $21 million this year.

    The airport slashed various other costs, including energy use, by $21 million.

    Finally, the projected loss from fewer planes landing at D/FW was about $1 million better than expected.

    It all adds up to a $15 million profit evenly spread among the airport's pension plan, a reduction in landing fees by 50 cents in hopes of luring new airlines and a refund to the existing airlines.

    "That was a little bit of a surprise," said Poinsatte, who was expecting to only break even this year.

    His year-end presentation impressed board members Thursday.

    "I have never seen any organization have as consistently good news in one year that this airport has had," Jan Collmer, the board's chairman, told his colleagues. "This has been the most incredible ride this year that I think any of us will ever experience."
    By the power of greyskull!

  23. #473
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    Quote Originally Posted by Geaux Tigers
    "That was a little bit of a surprise," said Poinsatte, who was expecting to only break even this year.
    Interesting to speculate as to whether DFW Airport management intentionally misled DFW Airport Board members and others when it came to the state of the airport's finances (due to the whole Wright Amendment fiasco).

    I recall at one point that the airport posted and then immediately pulled off their website traffic figures which showed the airport traffic numbers significantly above what the general perception at the time was... the numbers weren't reposted until a couple of key dates in the Wright Amendment discussion had passed by.

  24. #474
    Administrator tamtagon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by grantboston
    By DAVID WETHE
    STAR-TELEGRAM STAFF WRITER

    ...airport executives pitched an idea to board members for a 600-acre mixed-use development that would include a retail tract of 125 acres, and 700,000 to 800,000 square feet of space.
    ...
    But hes not signed up anyone specifically, and that would likely be a year and a half to two years away.
    ...
    The shopping center would likely have an upscale feel similar to many seen in suburban cities such as Southlake or Flower Mound....However, the restaurant plaza, which would include anywhere from five to seven upscale restaurants, is definitely trying to go after more travelers, Terrell said.
    ...
    The shopping center would also need to rely on shoppers from outside the area, not just airport patrons, he said. At least the north side of the airport is closer to dense apartment complexes and more housing, he said.
    I wonder what the future is for this idea.

  25. #475
    Administrator tamtagon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by UptownDallas
    Interesting to speculate as to whether DFW Airport management intentionally misled DFW Airport Board members and others when it came to the state of the airport's finances (due to the whole Wright Amendment fiasco).
    It is very curious, and I wouldnt be surprised if there was some intentional weaving of worst case scenerio possibilities into official financial forecasts which almost always seem to come with a best case scenerio tint.

    I'm glad most of the fiasco aura surrounding the Wright Amendment Reform Act (WARA) is behind us. It's probably still too early to really make a call, but the WARA just might be right on time to allow the Metroplex air travel industry the simultaneous expansion from contemporary market conditions as well as a retroactive gain of business lost due to Wright Amendment restrictions:

    -comes at a time when the travel industry seems to have recovered from terrorism fear;

    -the decision to persue bankruptcy protection among most service carriers is either avoided or embraced;

    -DFW facilities have been vastly improved (with more efficiencies in progress);

    -larger, longer range aircraft will make DFW competitive against the East and West Coast airports as a Gateway into the U.S. from most of the world.

  26. #476
    Administrator tamtagon's Avatar
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    Anyone know if Quantas or Air India have come any closer to decisions which would put them at DFW?

  27. #477
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    Quote Originally Posted by Geaux Tigers
    The Fort Worth-based carrier also shifted many of its flights to Dallas Love Field to compete with rival Southwest Airlines after recent changes to the Wright Amendment. At that time, in November, Missouri became the ninth state to be exempted from the 1979 federal law."
    What?? Many of it's flights??? AA "shifted 14 of 800+ flights to Love.

    What a bogus article...shows who owns the StAAr-Telegram!

    :realmad8:

  28. #478
    In the O.R. Geaux Tigers's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by St-T
    What?? Many of it's flights??? AA "shifted 14 of 800+ flights to Love.

    What a bogus article...shows who owns the StAAr-Telegram!
    Oh well, this is the Ft. Worth paper after all. I thought it was good news that DFW's passenger count (both international & domestic) is up to close to pre-9/11 levels.

    As for the question concerning Qantas above, last I've read on Airliners.net, it's just a matter of waiting on Boeing to finish the long range version of their 777. It's really no longer a matter of if, but when will Qantas start flying to DFW. I'd say within the next three years, we'll see a few red kangaroo tails parked at Terminal D. To be honest, I'd look for Qantas to shift a majority of it's North American operations from LAX to DFW.
    By the power of greyskull!

  29. #479
    Incoherent Rambler grantboston's Avatar
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    ^Agreed. Do you know if the 777-300ER has the range to fly that? Delta just bought a few of them. I know Emirates uses them to fly from JFK.

    As for Air India, I would be a little more skeptical. They're a Star Alliance carrier that lacks any connecting feed in DFW. There's some talk that Jet Airways/Air Sahara might join AA's alliance (One World). That might make a DFW-India flight a possibility.

    Of course, I imagine there are several markets AA would love to serve if they had the planes. The biggest obstacle to international expansion at DFW is AA's lack of excess long-haul aircraft to deploy to new markets.

  30. #480
    In the O.R. Geaux Tigers's Avatar
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    ^I believe the 777-300ER has the range, and those are the birds Qantas are waiting on. I think Qantas' engineers may be asking Boeing to tweek a few things here and there to make sure the range is adequate to fly SYD-DFW nonstop.
    By the power of greyskull!

  31. #481
    High-Rise Member TexasPlus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by grantboston
    ^Agreed. Do you know if the 777-300ER has the range to fly that? Delta just bought a few of them. I know Emirates uses them to fly from JFK.
    Cliped from Boeings website, dated Feb. 24, 2003:

    There are two Longer-Range 777 models. The 777-300ER carries 365 passengers up to 7,420 nautical miles (13,742 kilometers) while the 777-200LR can carry 301 passengers up to 9,170 nautical miles (16,983 kilometers).

    Both the 777-300ER and the 777-200LR were launched in February 2002 by Boeing and GE Aircraft Engines at the request of customers who asked for an airplane with additional flexibility to serve the non-stop routes that passengers demand.

    The 777 family has captured nearly 70 percent of the market since the airplane's October 1990 launch. Thirty-nine customers and operators worldwide have ordered 619 777s, including 61 Longer-Range 777s ordered by seven customers: Air France, All Nippon Airways, EVA Airways, GE Capital Aviation Services, ILFC, Japan Airlines and Pakistan International Airlines.

    http://www.boeing.com/news/releases/...r_030224g.html

    More at:
    http://www.geae.com/aboutgeae/pressc...0_2003224.html

    http://www.flug-revue.rotor.com/FRtypen/FR77730e.htm

    http://www.airliners.net/info/stats.main?id=107

    http://www.thehindubusinessline.com/...0400170700.htm
    "Liberalism: Moochers Electing Looters to Steal from Producers."

  32. #482
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    Departing? D/FW Airport wants you to first go on a shopping trip
    08:17 AM CST on Thursday, November 9, 2006
    By SUZANNE MARTA / The Dallas Morning News

    Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport's year-old Terminal D buzzes with travelers sipping wine at La Bodega winery, checking out gadgets at Brookstone or sampling the tamales at area favorites such as Reata Grill.

    But in the airport's older terminals, it's another story.

    Standing near Gate B17, the only concessionaires you can see are a hot dog stand and a Starbucks that's partially blocked by construction. It doesn't exactly inspire a traveler to shop.

    D/FW officials are trying to change that. Aiming to boost revenue from sources other than financially strapped tenant airlines, the airport is hoping to make travelers feel and spend more like they're in a shopping mall.

    Excluding duty-free sales, the average D/FW passenger spent about $5.79 last year well below the $7.05 industry average.

    If each of D/FW's departing passengers were to spend $1 more in the terminals, it would add $30 million in annual revenue, lifting total concession revenue nearly 15 percent.

    "We have more than 150,000 people walking through our terminals with money in their pockets, and they're hungry and they want to shop," said Joe Lopano, who heads D/FW's marketing efforts. "We want to capitalize on that."

    To do that, officials have launched an $800,000 marketing campaign that includes banners and billboards on and off the airport property, aboard parking shuttles and in the concourses.

    Research conducted by D/FW earlier this year showed that travelers were willing to shop but weren't aware of the shopping and dining options the airport offered.

    "You don't have a line of sight to be able to see there's a T.G.I. Friday's around the corner," Mr. Lopano said, referring to the horseshoe shape of D/FW's original four terminals.

    To alleviate that problem, airport officials divided the terminals into retail "neighborhoods" and posted signs that show restaurants and shops within a 10-minute walk the distance customers said they'd be willing to go.

    Nearly half of those surveyed said they'd even be willing to take the airport's Skylink train, which can connect a traveler to any of the other D/FW terminals and shopping options within about 5 minutes.

    The airport has made some other adjustments.

    In international Terminal D, vertical signs include pictures of nearby food options, an approach some concessionaires said has proved successful.

    "People are more visual," said Don Mitchell, an airport concessionaire who runs Blue Mesa and Blue Bamboo in Terminal D and several Freshens frozen yogurt stands in the other terminals. "When they can see pictures of something, they're more likely to go there."

    Mr. Mitchell said he's noticed customers wander more around Terminal D, looking at the various art installations and shopping. "In the older terminals, they tend to stay closer to their gate," he said.

    Terminal D's mix of higher-end retailers and restaurants has also translated into higher sales. In that terminal, the average passenger spent 45 percent more than the airportwide figure.

    About 60 stanchions filled with shopping guides are scattered through all the terminals showing nearby concessionaires. Pocket-size booklets list all the concessions throughout the airport. Like a mall, the airport will launch seasonal campaigns, promoting shopping periods before Christmas or Mother's Day.

    Shopping and other concession revenues have taken on more importance to D/FW, which is looking to ease the costs of its airline tenants.

    Traffic patterns have changed dramatically since the 9/11 terrorist attacks.

    Local travelers arrive at the airport earlier for added security. Meanwhile, American Airlines Inc. has changed its schedule at its D/FW hub, so that many connecting passengers wait longer between flights.

    As a result, "dwell" time inside D/FW's terminals has stretched to as much as two hours. That extra time presents a customer service issue for the airport as travelers try to be productive or at least be entertained.

    Meanwhile, the elimination of meal service in coach on most domestic flights means travelers want more food options at the airport.

    During the last five years, concession sales have risen more than 50 percent.

    Mark Knight, regional director for developer BAA USA Inc., said U.S. airports' focus on driving retail sales has intensified during the last five years.

    "It's not acceptable anymore to have an airport that doesn't generate great retail sales," Mr. Knight said. "Maximizing revenues at the airport is critical to making sure airlines have a better operating environment."

    BAA USA, whose parent company runs London's Heathrow and Gatwick airports, among several others, pioneered the movement in the U.S. 15 years ago, transforming the concessions at Pittsburgh International Airport by introducing street pricing and attracting mall mainstays such as the Gap and Johnston & Murphy. The airport is now the industry leader, with 2006 sales per passenger exceeding $13.

    The street pricing initiative proved important in changing perceptions that airport shops were more expensive than those in a mall.

    For more than a decade, D/FW has enforced pricing rules that allow concessionaires to charge no more than 10 percent higher than their counterparts away from the airport.

    Airport customers tend to be more affluent than those in a typical mall, making them an attractive target for retailers.

    "These are people with more money than time," Mr. Knight said. "If you can offer something they want at a reasonable price, it's amazing how much business you can do."

    E-mail smarta@dallasnews.com

    AIRPORT SHOPPING

    Spending at newsstands, restaurants and stores at airports has been growing as travelers spend more time in terminals. Heres how the top performing North American airports compare:

    Rank


    Airport


    Average sales per departing passenger*

    1.


    Pittsburgh


    $12.27

    2.


    New York (JFK):


    $9.62

    3.


    San Francisco


    $9.16

    4.


    Newark, N.J.


    $9.05

    5.


    Calgary, Alberta


    $8.98

    6.


    Honolulu


    $8.81

    7.


    Portland, Ore.


    $8.65

    8.


    Anchorage, Alaska


    $8.54

    9.


    Las Vegas


    $8.26

    10.


    Washington, D.C. (Reagan)


    $8.06

    11.


    Boston


    $7.91

    12.


    Miami


    $7.90

    13.


    Savannah, Ga.


    $7.78

    14.


    Detroit


    $7.77

    15.


    Seattle


    $7.27

    16.


    Denver


    $7.22

    17.


    Toronto


    $7.21

    18.**


    Philadelphia


    $7.20

    19.


    Indianapolis


    $7.20

    20.


    Los Angeles


    $7.05

    21.


    Minneapolis/St. Paul


    $7.04

    22.


    Cincinnati


    $.6.94

    23.


    West Palm Beach, Fla.


    $6.92

    24.


    Orlando, Fla.


    $6.87

    25.


    St. Louis


    $6.85

    26.


    New York (LaGuardia)


    $6.84

    27.


    Chicago (OHare)


    $6.82

    28.


    Phoenix


    $6.76

    29.**


    Tampa, Fla.


    $6.64

    30.


    Atlantic City, N.J.


    $6.64

    31.


    Atlanta


    $6.51

    32.


    Charlotte, N.C.


    $6.36

    33.


    Salt Lake City


    $6.32

    34.


    Baltimore


    $6.24

    35.


    Reno, Nev.


    $6.20

    36.


    San Antonio


    $6.09

    37.


    Memphis, Tenn.


    $6.02

    38.


    Columbus, Ohio


    $6

    39.


    Nashville, Tenn.


    $5.98

    40.


    Washington D.C. (Dulles)


    $5.95

    41.


    Sacramento, Calif.


    $5.92

    42.


    Sarasota/Bradenton (Florida)


    $5.84

    43.


    Austin


    $5.82

    44.


    Dallas/Fort Worth


    $5.79

    45.


    Milwaukee, Wis.


    $5.78

    46.


    Fort Lauderdale, Fla.


    $5.69

    47.


    Fresno, Calif.


    $5.50

    48.


    Santa Ana, Calif.


    $5.47

    49.


    Albany, N.Y.


    $5.36

    50.


    Raleigh-Durham, N.C.


    $5.30




    Average


    $7.05

    *Figures are for 2005. Excludes sales of duty-free items

    **In cases of a tie, the airport with higher total sales ranks higher.

    SOURCE: Airport Revenue News

  33. #483
    Administrator tamtagon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by njjeppson
    08:17 AM CST on Thursday, November 9, 2006
    By SUZANNE MARTA / The Dallas Morning News
    ...
    Nearly half of those surveyed said they'd even be willing to take the airport's Skylink train, which can connect a traveler to any of the other D/FW terminals and shopping options within about 5 minutes.
    Transit oriented retail development inside the airport?

  34. #484
    High-Rise Member TexasPlus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by njjeppson
    Departing? D/FW Airport wants you to first go on a shopping trip


    Orlando, Fla.


    $6.87

    25.
    The ranking of DFW does not surprised me. But I am surprised at how low Orlando MCO ranked in shopping money spent. It is one of two airports that remind me most of being Mall like. The other is Schiphol airport in Amsterdam.
    "Liberalism: Moochers Electing Looters to Steal from Producers."

  35. #485
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    TSA and Grand Hyatt DFW Launch Pilot Program Giving Hotel Guests Access to Secured Side of Terminal D at DFW International Airport
    Wednesday December 6, 12:15 pm ET

    DALLAS--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Grand Hyatt DFW, adjoined to the state-of-the-art International Terminal D at DFW International Airport, today announced that the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) has recently given the hotel authorization to implement a unique pilot program - Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport Access Authorization to Commercial Establishments Beyond the Screening Checkpoint Pilot Program (AAACE Program). TSA's AAACE Program gives qualifying hotel guests staying at the Grand Hyatt DFW an opportunity to proceed through security screening at Terminal D in order to gain access to the facility's specialty shops, restaurants and other commercial establishments. The AAACE Program is voluntary and is limited to only registered overnight guests at the Grand Hyatt DFW. It is being conducted by TSA in cooperation with the hotel and the DFW Airport Board, the hotel's operator...

    http://biz.yahoo.com/bw/061206/20061206005712.html?.v=1

  36. #486
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    TSA considers allowing some non-travelers to reach airport gates at DFW

    VIDEO STORY

  37. #487
    The Urban Pragmatist Mballar's Avatar
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    I knew it would only be a matter of time before the TSA eased the restrictions. . .especially at DFW. Many of those vendors negotiated their leases based upon pre-9/11 revenue history. Surely, the airport has had to allow the DFW vendors significant discounts in lease payments because there is no way they could pay the rent when those vendors can not now only rely on non-passenger traffic, as they did before. I know that when I go through the airport (mostly Terminals A & C), there is little to no traffic in those stores/restaurants.
    A wise man speaks because he has something to say; a fool because he has to say something. - Plato

  38. #488
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    Limited-access terminals aren't secure in the slightest. Anyone who has every printed a boarding pass online can forge a new one with updated flight and date information using only Microsoft Word.

    I could go to Terminal D and hang out all day long if I wanted to. And nobody would know. These security measures are a pointless inconvenience. Anyone who wants to circumvent them, can.

  39. #489
    Administrator dfwcre8tive's Avatar
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    DFW also has several security entrances scattered throughout the terminals, so allowing non-ticketed passengers through security probably would not affect lines or wait times at checkpoints.

  40. #490
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    D/FW ranked 3rd busiest airport
    01:46 PM CST on Thursday, January 4, 2007
    Associated Press

    ATLANTA For the second year in a row, Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport has retained its title as the nation's busiest in terms of flights, according to government data released Thursday.

    Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport was ranked third, with 702,713 flights in 2006, down 2.2 percent from 718,207 flights in 2005, the FAA said.

    The Atlanta airport logged 976,307 flights in 2006, down 0.4 percent from its 980,386 flights in 2005, the Federal Aviation Administration said. Flights include takeoffs and landings.

    Its rival, Chicago O'Hare International Airport, was listed second busiest, with 958,643 flights in 2006. That number was down 1.4 percent from the 972,246 flights it had in 2005, the FAA said.

    Atlanta and Chicago have run neck-and-neck in recent years to claim the title of the nation's and therefore, the world's busiest airport. Atlanta already claimed to be the world's busiest airport in terms of passengers. The FAA does not maintain passenger statistics.

    Atlanta airport spokeswoman Sterling Payne cited two reasons for the airport's ranking: "Its capacity and efficiency."

    She said opening a fifth runway in May benefited the airport and last year's expansion of international flights by Delta Air Lines Inc. which has its primary hub in Atlanta also was another factor that caused the Atlanta airport to remain the nation's busiest.

    "We had a total paradigm change looking at Delta's travel patterns," Payne said.

    O'Hare spokeswoman Wendy Abrams said in a statement that officials there were not surprised that the Atlanta airport had more flights in 2006.

    "O'Hare's flight restrictions, which are scheduled to expire next year, have limited our ability to land and depart aircraft and, ultimately, meet the demand for air service that continues to grow at our airport," Abrams said.

    But she said city officials are "committed to maintaining Chicago's role as the leading aviation market." A massive expansion plan for O'Hare is expected to be finished in 2013.

    Chicago's other major airport, Midway Airport, had 298,547 flights in 2006, up 2.7 percent from the 290,756 flights it had in 2005, the federal agency said. Abrams said Midway does not have flight restrictions and can add new slots for flights based on market demand.

    In July, based on data for the first six months of 2006, O'Hare was listed by the FAA as the nation's busiest airport with 477,001 flights compared to Atlanta's 472,431 flights. But Payne said the Atlanta airport had more flights in the latter part of the year.

  41. #491
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    Cincinnati's sky-high airfares are tops in the USA
    Updated 1/3/2007 4:02 PM ET
    By Alexander Coolidge, The Cincinnati Enquirer

    HEBRON, Ky. With the average round-trip ticket costing $570, Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International (CVG) continues to be the nation's most expensive major airport to fly to or from.

    The airport topped the ticket price charts from April to June of 2006 the third straight quarter according to the latest fare price report issued by the U.S. Department of Transportation's office of aviation analysis.

    With the airport dominated by Delta Air Lines' second-largest hub, ticket prices have long been the target of criticism as CVG consistently places among the most expensive major airports in government statistics. The last time CVG wasn't No. 1 was during the third quarter of 2005 when it was No. 5.

    Delta operates more than 80% of the flights here.

    Airport officials say they've worked to get fares lower, but when new low-cost competition comes in, Delta lowers its rates and the newcomer pulls out.

    "We try to work with all our carriers to control our cost to them in hopes to get fares down, but never stop talking to low-cost carriers," airport spokesman Ted Bushelman said.

    The Hebron airport recently landed service from a smaller low-cost carrier. Southern Skyways announced in the fall that it would offer, starting in March, twice weekly direct service to Charleston, W.Va., and service to Myrtle Beach, S.C. The airport also has low-cost service to Fort Myers, Fla., and Cancun from USA 3000 Airlines.

    Cincinnati was recently passed over by low-cost AirTran Airways, which polled its customers to suggest where to add service. The Orlando, carrier listed CVG on a list of 50 potential new destinations. Phoenix won.

    Delta officials have defended local fares in the past, saying they cover the costs of offering direct service to more than 120 destinations, including Europe, Mexico and the Caribbean.

    Local fliers won relief from high fares in the summer of 2004 through early 2005, as Delta tinkered with its pricing before filing for bankruptcy in the fall of 2005.

    Rounding out the top five most-expensive major airports with average round-trip fares: No. 2, San Francisco International Airport, $494; No. 3, Dulles International Airport in Washington, D.C., $448; No. 4 (tie), Newark International Airport in New Jersey and Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport, $448.

    The Cincinnati Enquirer is owned by Gannett, parent company of USA TODAY.
    Copyright 2006 USA TODAY
    http://www.usatoday.com/travel/fligh...airfares_x.htm

  42. #492
    Skyscraper Member LakeHighlands's Avatar
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    Dfwia???

    Im so sorry for doing this but

    This is driving me insane!!!!!!! Where did yall come up with DFWIA?

    I have never heard Dallas/ Fort Worth International Airport referred to as DFWIA.
    I have lived in Dallas long before DFW was ever built and to this day I have never heard anyone refer to the airport as DFWIA.

    I know the airport itself does not refer to itself as DFWIA, but simply DFW for short.
    See their website
    http://www.dfwairport.com/index.html

    I also know IATA (International Air Transport Association) location identifier, which is the proper abbreviation for Dallas Fort Worth International Airport is DFW. The FAA and everyone in the aviation industry use the abbreviation DFW and not DFWIA.

    http://www.dfwairport.com/airport/br.../identity.html

    I also asked a few of my aviation friends and son who is also a pilot and a graduate of Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, if they ever used and heard any one call DFW, DFWIA. Everyone said no.

    My flight instructing days are long over, but had I ever heard a student call DFW, DFWIA, I would land the plane and send little Johnny home to go study.

    DFWIA reminds me of DIA aka Denver International Airport

    I think DFWIA just makes it more confusing than simply DFW Airport or just DFW.

    Im sorry for my rant but I guess it is just the pilot in me oh I cringed every time I had to type DFWIA.(first time in my life and at my age that says a lot)



    "One of Dallas' strongest communities, Lake Highlands boasts a true sense of neighborhood spirit. Local stores reflect passionate support for Lake Highlands schools with school posters and signs. True to its name, the area features handsome traditional homes up and down rolling hills and charming, winding roads." --Lake Highlands People

  43. #493
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    Quote Originally Posted by LakeHighlands
    Im so sorry for doing this but

    This is driving me insane!!!!!!! Where did yall come up with DFWIA?

    I have never heard Dallas/ Fort Worth International Airport referred to as DFWIA.
    I have lived in Dallas long before DFW was ever built and to this day I have never heard anyone refer to the airport as DFWIA.

    I know the airport itself does not refer to itself as DFWIA, but simply DFW for short.
    See their website
    http://www.dfwairport.com/index.html

    I also know IATA (International Air Transport Association) location identifier, which is the proper abbreviation for Dallas Fort Worth International Airport is DFW. The FAA and everyone in the aviation industry use the abbreviation DFW and not DFWIA.

    http://www.dfwairport.com/airport/br.../identity.html

    I also asked a few of my aviation friends and son who is also a pilot and a graduate of Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, if they ever used and heard any one call DFW, DFWIA. Everyone said no.

    My flight instructing days are long over, but had I ever heard a student call DFW, DFWIA, I would land the plane and send little Johnny home to go study.

    DFWIA reminds me of DIA aka Denver International Airport

    I think DFWIA just makes it more confusing than simply DFW Airport or just DFW.

    Im sorry for my rant but I guess it is just the pilot in me oh I cringed every time I had to type DFWIA.(first time in my life and at my age that says a lot)



    Man, I totally agree with your statement. I refuse to say DFWIA. It's DFW and always will. I'm a pilot too, and everyone know it as DFW. No ones gonna call it DFWIA.

  44. #494
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    I agree too... I'm not sure when the brainiacs on the board changed it but they did...it's stupid.

  45. #495
    In the O.R. Geaux Tigers's Avatar
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    Yeah, please call it DFW like the FAA refers to it as.
    By the power of greyskull!

  46. #496
    Administrator dfwcre8tive's Avatar
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    I agree. It's DFW or DFW International Airport. I worked on the Terminal Parking campaign now up on billboards and around the airport.

  47. #497
    High-Rise Member TexasPlus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LakeHighlands

    I also know IATA (International Air Transport Association) location identifier, which is the proper abbreviation for Dallas Fort Worth International Airport is DFW. The FAA and everyone in the aviation industry use the abbreviation DFW and not DFWIA.
    Not everyone, you forgot about the ever present ICAO airport designation codes. KDFW

    ICAO airport code
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    The ICAO airport code (IPA pronunciation: [aɪ'keɪˌjo]) or location indicator is a four-letter alphanumeric code designating each airport around the world. These codes are defined by the International Civil Aviation Organization and published in ICAO Document 7910: Location Indicators.

    The ICAO codes are used by air traffic control and airline operations such as flight planning. They are not the same as the IATA codes encountered by the general public, which are used for airline timetables, reservations, and baggage handling. ICAO codes are also used to identify other locations such as weather stations, International Flight Service Stations or Area Control Centers, whether or not they are located at airports.

    Unlike the IATA codes, the ICAO codes have a regional structure, are not duplicated and are comprehensive. In general, the first letter is allocated by continent and represents a country or group of countries within that continent. The second letter generally represents a country within that region, and the remaining two are used to identify each airport. The exception to this rule are larger countries that have single-letter country codes, where the remaining three letters identify the airport.

    In the contiguous United States and Canada, most airports have been assigned three-letter IATA codes which are the same as their ICAO code without the leading K or C. e.g., YYC (Calgary International Airport, Calgary, Alberta) and CYYC, IAD (Dulles International Airport, Chantilly, Virginia) and KIAD. These codes are not to be confused with radio or television call signs, even though both countries use four-letter call signs starting with those letters.

    However, because Alaska, Hawaiʻi and other United States territories have their own 2-letter ICAO prefix, the situation there is similar to other smaller countries and the ICAO code of their airports is typically different from its corresponding 3-letter FAA/IATA identifier. For example, Hilo International Airport (PHTO vs ITO) and Juneau International Airport (PAJN vs JNU).
    "Liberalism: Moochers Electing Looters to Steal from Producers."

  48. #498
    Skyscraper Member LakeHighlands's Avatar
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    Oh yes the paper work identifier.

    I did not forget about ICAO code, I just left it out for the sake of confusion to the general public. I think the general public is more aware of the KDFW and so forth as being used in the communications with broadcast station such as KDFW Fox 4 which is not to be confused with the KDFW which is DFW Airport code by ICAO. Sure you write KDFW for flight plans, air navigation, METAR report etc. (I think the vast majority of people would not need to ever obtain a METAR report, and if they did, I doubt they could read one.) I should of said that KDFW is also used as an abbrevation in air navagation.

    Still I would say we are going to DFW and not KDFW. Almost all airports in the lower 48 have a K in front of their IATA code so the K is just like a silent prefix that used. The IATA code which is also the FAA Identifier is the most important part of the information.

    In terms of knowledge and confusion to the public I would put ICAO code KDFW in with words Maverick, Cowboy, and Ranger (Im not talking about the sports teams). Maverick and Cowboy are VOR/DME and Ranger is VORTAC used in air navigation. In case anyone wants to know what Maverick or Cowboy looks like, if you ever enter DFW Airport using the south entrance and look in between the freeway lanes right after the tollbooth, you will see a big white antenna looking structure. That is the Maverick VOR/DME and just off of I-35 to the west south of Royal you can see Cowboy VOR/DME.


    Quote Originally Posted by TexasPlus
    , IAD (Dulles International Airport, Chantilly, Virginia)
    See this is a good example why a person can not just take the airport name and try to use the first letters of each word of the name of an airport as an abbreviation. If someone abbreviated Dulles International Airport DIA, that would be incorrect as DIA is Denver International Airport.

    Anyways earlier I was just pointing that out about DFW.
    "One of Dallas' strongest communities, Lake Highlands boasts a true sense of neighborhood spirit. Local stores reflect passionate support for Lake Highlands schools with school posters and signs. True to its name, the area features handsome traditional homes up and down rolling hills and charming, winding roads." --Lake Highlands People

  49. #499
    High-Rise Member TexasPlus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LakeHighlands
    I did not forget about ICAO code, I just left it out for the sake of confusion to the general public.
    Having been involved with aviation since before my birth(1), I have never had the luxury of looking at aviation from the point of view of the general public. :angel:

    The absolute statement "The FAA and everyone in the aviation industry use the abbreviation DFW and not DFWIA." was not accurate, hence I stand by my correction. :beat:


    (1)Dad was a "Barn Stormer" taking folks for plane rides in his OX5 powered Jenny when he met and marred my Mom in the 30's.
    "Liberalism: Moochers Electing Looters to Steal from Producers."

  50. #500
    Administrator dfwcre8tive's Avatar
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    D/FW plugging into need for outlets
    Airport conducts survey on recharging batteries on the fly

    11:06 PM CST on Wednesday, January 10, 2007
    By SUZANNE MARTA / The Dallas Morning News

    When Robert Justice arrives at his gate for a flight, he automatically scans for any available outlets under chairs or along the walls.

    "I've even moved furniture and displays to be able to plug in," said Mr. Justice, who travels 42 weeks a year for his job as a systems engineer.

    Keeping electronic gadgetry juiced up is a growing frustration for business travelers, who are carrying more devices and waiting longer in airports, in part because of added security.

    Replenishing computer and cellphone batteries between flights often entails sitting on the airport floor. Some travelers inadvertently create tripwires as their power cords stretch between power outlets and their seats.

    For Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport, that frustration may prove to be an opportunity.

    With help from a group of graduate business students at Texas Christian University, D/FW is studying whether adding amenities such as power outlets could attract more connecting passengers.

    Connecting passengers are crucial for D/FW, accounting for about two-thirds of the airport's 60 million passengers each year.

    Through their spending on concessions and services, those travelers benefit the airport. As D/FW handles more connecting passengers, it's able to add flights, offering better travel choices for local fliers.

    The group from TCU will spend several months conducting surveys of D/FW passengers, comparing services at other airports, creating benchmarks and developing a strategy that makes the most of the airport's investments and sales opportunities.

    Making the circuit


    D/FW isn't alone in its efforts to add more technology-friendly amenities to its gate areas.

    Southwest Airlines Co. recently installed two prototypes of powered charging stations near gates 12 and 14 at Dallas Love Field. The Dallas-based discounter is considering installing the stations at other airports.

    Across the U.S., airports are replacing banks of pay phones with workstations, adding power outlets to tables in food courts and installing "power poles" in seating areas.

    Almost 70 percent of passengers carry some kind of electronic device with them when they fly, according to a recent survey commissioned by D/FW.

    "If you walk in our terminals, you'll see people on the floor or by the trash bins plugging in," said Ken Buchanan, the airport's executive vice president of revenue management.

    Part of the problem is that fitting gate areas with additional wall outlets is expensive.

    During the last few weeks, D/FW has been testing "Pump Up Your Portables" stations in each of its five terminals, kiosks that allow travelers to buy access to power at their seats in 30-minute increments.

    Kiosk developer AdComp Systems Inc. of Carrollton runs power to several seats in an area, then pays the airport a percentage of its sales as an airport concessionaire. D/FW is the first airport to install the machines. The company said it has received inquiries from several other airports.

    D/FW has installed massage chairs that include power outlets in Terminal C and expects to add them in the other four terminals.

    Neptune Networks e-mail kiosks, which debuted at D/FW in 2003, will also add locations later this year.

    D/FW plans to add PowerPort kiosks that allow travelers to lock up their electronics to recharge while they grab a bite.

    The airport is also working to modify a Samsung kiosk near Gate 27 in Terminal C to create eight additional powered workstations.

    Other modifications include opening the all-airline lounge in Terminal D to the public. The club, near Gate 21, sells day passes for a $35 fee and annual memberships for $50.

    D/FW created eight public business centers in 2005, adjoining Starbucks shops and using space created when the airport built its Skylink train. The refuges offer plush leather seating, semi-private workspaces and a lounge-like atmosphere.

    Since 2000, the airport has offered a Laptop Lane location, a pay-for-use mini-business center in Terminal C. Laptop Lane also has locations in other airports around the country.

    Some business travel experts say D/FW's efforts may be on the right track.

    Knowing that an airport is easy to work in is an important factor in deciding where to connect or how early to arrive for a flight, said Carol Devine, who oversees travel procurement for Fort Worth-based Burlington Northern Santa Fe Corp. and is the past president and chairwoman of the National Business Travel Association.

    'Buying decision'

    "It is part of my buying decision," Ms. Devine said, adding that access to power was one of the key reasons she maintains her membership in American Airlines' Admirals Club.

    The ability to get work done at the airport has been a chief focus for American, as the Fort Worth-based airline upgrades and builds new lounges. American is set to open its newest club at Tokyo's Narita International Airport later this month and has said it will be a technology flagship for the carrier.

    The Admirals Club at Terminal D includes power outlets on all tables and beneath bench seating. The carrier also offers power ports at each seat in its premium-class cabins, throughout its MD-80 aircraft and on its two-class 767-300 aircraft.

    All the attention to power outlets can't come soon enough for Mr. Justice, an executive platinum flier on American who books his seat assignments so that he's close to a power port.

    More often, he relies on his arsenal of batteries to avoid being caught without power.

    "I probably spend $200 to $400 a year on batteries," Mr. Justice said.

    That includes two batteries for his cellphone, two for his notebook computer, an external battery for his iPod and a handful of AAA batteries in case either his pager or MP3 player needs extra juice.

    E-mail smarta@dallasnews.com

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