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Thread: Conventions and Trade Shows

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    D-Down Conventions and Trade Shows

    ^ The convention/trade show business is in long-term decline due to the Internet, telecommunications improvements and the hassles of travel. To assume the convention business will be in "high gear" in two years has no rational basis.

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    Mega-Tall Skyscraper Member AeroD's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hannibal Lecter View Post
    ^ The convention/trade show business is in long-term decline due to the Internet, telecommunications improvements and the hassles of travel. To assume the convention business will be in "high gear" in two years has no rational basis.
    Trade show business won't decline any time soon. People no matter what still feel the need to gather. The internet and telecommunications improvements only facilitate that.
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    Skyscraper Member Double Wide's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hannibal Lecter View Post
    ^ The convention/trade show business is in long-term decline due to the Internet, telecommunications improvements and the hassles of travel. To assume the convention business will be in "high gear" in two years has no rational basis.
    Yes, because the internet answers all your questions the way you ask them. Because you can physically hold, touch and see how something is in front of you on the internet. Because you can look a possible client in the eye, shake his or her hand and re-assure them that you got their back on the internet. I'm sorry but Trade Shows and Conventions arn't put on for the fun of it.
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    Hannibal.... Isn't that part of the very same argument that the Anatole had in its big campaign to stop the convention center hotel...that convention / trade shows will not be around much longer and they are a dying breed. Now you have the convention center signing new conventions through 2017, exceeding some of their expectations while meeting others. There is no replacement for human interaction (that you will not get through tech-y devices), just like we have learned no matter how hard we try there will be no paperless office, and as many people have chanted in the past downtown areas will be a thing of the past yet we see many people / companies moving back to downtown in cities in the past 10-15 years.
    Last edited by slfunk; 11 October 2011 at 10:49 AM.

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    - no replacement for human interaction, but is the human interaction at an annual convention the best way? We've come to the conclusion that better ways exist without your competitors standing right next to you. How effective is something that requires your client to travel to see you in very expensive ways?
    - Paperless office is here. If you are still using paper for anything but a scratchpad, it has to be a personal preference or backward IT because all the tools are here and they save money (meaning supplies budgets are getting cut and affected units better get onboard)
    -2010 census shows no reversal in employment or housing trends for central core from the previous 30 years. For people like myself, near downtown works. I just don't see myself as a reversal of trend and neither does the Dept of Commerce.

    Nothing has changed regarding the domestic convention business. We simply have another big player, ourselves, back at the table. For every big convention we get, that was one that somebody else had. It's a decreasing zero sum game.

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    Anyone remember the annual SnowFest ski show in Dallas? It ran for over two decades and attracted tens of thousands of people each year to see exhibits by dozen of ski resorts and equipment manufacturers. It was part of a long-running national tour.

    In 2004 it attracted almost 30,000 people to Market Hall, making it one of the highest-attended trade shows in Dallas.

    In 2005 there was a noticeable decline in attendance and exhibitors.

    In 2006 it was reduced to a press release saying "sorry, we've been replaced by the Internet".

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    This evening, I'll move the posts about the state of the Convention & Trade Show Industry to a more appropriate thread.

    For at least the next five years, Dallas is going to experience a steady and substantial surge in convention, trade show and professional association meeting tourism. It's starting to seem like almost all aspects of the economic disaster turning-off the Metroplex during the S&L/Real Estate Crash of the 1980s is reversed in the 2010s.

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    This will be my last post on this topic b/c this thread is getting off track. I should post a pod cast that came through from the AIA. Its from an architecture professor studying the trends of redeveloping old mall sites. She has some rather interesting stats that she and her colleagues have been studying for several years. She does talk about malls, but she also has some eye opening stats about the burbs and a shift in population. Much of it is in-line with what we are seeing in practice. People looking for a sense of place that you will not find in most suburbs, people moving back to intown neighborhoods, and the aging population and what will be left for those of us that came after the baby boomers. Mall sites are being redeveloped to fill this void and create a downtown or central place of commerce in the burbs.

    We are seeing more and more projects pop up intown these days, something we thought would be on hold for awhile b/c of the economy and they are typically more expensive. Talking with my peers in the industry, this is both with local firms and international firms. Many of the big name and small name developers are shopping projects intown rather than the easy money outlying areas b/c that is where they are seeing these areas as places for building on the growth we have seen over the past 20 years. This is not to say or be interpreted I believe projects in the burbs are dead, but you will hear more about projects intown. Big reason I believe is what this professor discusses. She has been able to identify that once you hit the 10 - 15 mile distance of people living from work, you see a change in a households quality of life because of traveling. Your downtown cores still account for the largest piece of the pie when it comes to office space. There are other things, but at the end of the day all the hoopla around the trendy social networks and tech-y devices help our day to day business practices, but don't replace human interaction. Human interaction that exists in communities, conferences, mercantile, business, and social settings. Online shopping is a great example of this. We thought the closing of aging malls was directly related to this, and for a long time retailers were believing online shopping was going to be horrific for brick and mortar stores. Instead we have seen steady growth in new developments to the point that we are over saturated with retail in some areas. The ones that are suffering are those strip centers and malls that have not or can not change to meet the ever changing demographic.

    As far as the paperless office being here. Let me say we have a very tech savy office, but I have yet to step in the door of a business whether it by my gym, office, client's office, doctor's office, accountants office... or whomever that does not still use paper. While I know there are more, the two exceptions I have found is my friend who is a software programmer and another who is a physical therapist and uses a tablet to input patient information (but he still has print out stuff so I don't know if that counts). Technology has allowed myself, colleagues and clients reduce paper usage, but we still use paper. Sometimes it gets a little hazardous having to work by candlelight, but we manage.
    Last edited by slfunk; 11 October 2011 at 10:42 PM.

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